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wiring question

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BWOOD

Farmall Cub
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
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BLYTHEWOOD S.C.
Starting to do a little wiring. I know that the wire size needs to be right for the amps and length. I would like to buy multiple rolls, colors of wire. My question is if I get 10ga. wire will it handle most of the stuff I need to run? Can a wire be too big for the amps? I just didn't want to buy a bunch of rolls and colors in a bunch of different sizes, if I can buy 6 or so in the same gauge.
 

250gibson

Binder Driver
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Aug 17, 2005
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Bucks County, PA
10ga is really thick and will hard to snake it where it needs to go. It all depends what you are wiring ie: ignition, lights, guages, etc.. Most of the wiring does not need to carry that kind of load. I would suggest buying 10ga - 18ga, using one color for each. I believe that is what IH did. They mostly used red for 10ga, Blue for 12ga, White (for 14ga or 16ga) and green for 18ga. Most of the wiring was 18ga hence all the green wires.
 

scoutboy74

Lives in an IH Dealership
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Daze Crick, Jefferson
10 ga would be overkill for many of the circuits. I don't know if that would be a bad thing. The OE wiring was basically one size too small across the board, ie 16 ga should have been 14 etc. I think you're better with too large a gauge rather than too small for the load. How about 10 for the heavy load circuits and 14 for the light stuff?
 

Eric VanBuren

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10ga is really thick and will hard to snake it where it needs to go. It all depends what you are wiring ie: ignition, lights, guages, etc.. Most of the wiring does not need to carry that kind of load. I would suggest buying 10ga - 18ga, using one color for each. I believe that is what IH did. They mostly used red for 10ga, Blue for 12ga, White (for 14ga or 16ga) and green for 18ga. Most of the wiring was 18ga hence all the green wires.

The SAE standard that IH followed was 10ga blue, 12ga red, 14 ga white, 16 ga black, 18ga green.
 

jawsplace

Farmall Cub
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Jun 28, 2010
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Houston, TX
Only 10 gauge I ran (as replacement) is the main wire from the alternator to the ammeter and back to the starter solenoid. This was the wire size from the factory. I believe that's the only 10 gauge used anywhere.

If you get a hold of the electric schematic you'll see the majority of wiring is 14, 16 & 18 guage. Only a couple runs of 12 guage.
 

BWOOD

Farmall Cub
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Dec 14, 2010
Messages
310
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BLYTHEWOOD S.C.
I was thinking that different things would be easier to trace with it's own designated color, power=red, ground=green,etc. or even specific colors for each thing, purple=gauges,blue=lights etc. I guess it is just preference huh? I like the idea of using nothing smaller than 14ga. THANKS GUYS!
 

MyScout800

Binder Driver
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Dec 24, 2001
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Boise, Idaho
I was thinking that different things would be easier to trace with it's own designated color, power=red, ground=green,etc. or even specific colors for each thing, purple=gauges,blue=lights etc. I guess it is just preference huh? I like the idea of using nothing smaller than 14ga. THANKS GUYS!

You'll make your scout really heavy using all that extra copper! :)
 

Damon L

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Sep 21, 2007
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Lake City, MN
If it were me, I would run different guage wires and different colors for troubleshooting purposes. Make the diagram as you go along.

What I did when I rewired my 800 is just buy a prewired hotrod fuse block. The wires are labeled every 6 inches or so in addition to different colors, and most circuits are properly sized for what they are powering. I eliminated the bulkhead connector and ammeter in the process for safety and reliabiity. The kit I used was the Rebel Wire 9+3, but you can get them from different companies, also. (Painless, EZ wire, etc.)

Here's the only in-process shot:
2010-08-03204334.jpg
 

tdc

Dreams of Cub Cadets
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Sep 8, 2005
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PNW
I was thinking that different things would be easier to trace with it's own designated color, power=red, ground=green,etc. or even specific colors for each thing, purple=gauges,blue=lights etc. I guess it is just preference huh? I like the idea of using nothing smaller than 14ga. THANKS GUYS!
A continuity tester can do that. :beer:
 

Doc Stewart

Content Team
Staff member
Moderator
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Jun 6, 2003
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San Francisco, CA 94066
I'm with Bwood: Colors indicate purpose such as lights are yellow.

When wiring my various boats over the years, I always went one size larger on the wires for two reasons. Boats have a long runs of wire. Boats are subject to corrosion. Heavier wire helps both reasons.

Another lesson from boats: seal each connection. If you solder, use shrink tubing. If you use crimp connectors, seal the connectors either with dielectric grease or use some clear polyurethane spray on each one.

Our 4x4s are subjected to conditions more sever than a street truck. Heavier wire and sealed connections are useful.
 
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