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"Safe" water depth to drive thru with SII?

jawsplace

Farmall Cub
What water depth can a Scout II drive through (slow and cautiously - not trying to make a spectacular splash) without killing the engine? I'm talking about a stock SII, stock suspension height, stock tires. I guess the real determining factor is how high water can get on the engine. Bottom of the fan blades?
 

Fred Demmon

Y-Block King
Keep the RPM's up and keep the water out of the intake and Dist. and you will be fine(this applies to most any engine)

Heavy rain today got you worried?
 

jawsplace

Farmall Cub
Yeah the flooding over the past couple weeks had me wondering - especially when other cars are stopped dead in their tracks in 6" of water. I haven't been venturing out with my SII in this recent weather anyway (because I'm completing my restoration/preservation and staying out of the rain) but I'm looking forward to getting out there soon.
 

76 xlc

Banned
Safe for you or safe for your Scout's components? Moving or still waters?

Stock axle vents can let in water at hub depth.
 

Thomas

Dreams of Cub Cadets
... Stock axle vents can let in water at hub depth...
---As stated, prep repels H2O doom.

---You can pop the vent cap off by prying with a 7/16" open end wrench or by using needle nosed pliers like a pickel fork. After doing so, you can do two things

-Run hose down the frame of the truck from a high point in the engine compartment and under the hood you tie them into the bottom of a steel box with bulkhead fittings for fuel line and such. Install a vent at the top of the box. Manual Transmission, Transfer Case and Axles all have vents.

-Use coiled air line and clamp one end to the axle vents and on the other end, install a plastic fuel filter like that for lawn mowers. Wrap the coiled tubing around the axle until you are going to tread water... and then undo the air line's temporary mount and hook the filtered end to the gutter on the Traveltop or something. The M/T and T/C you can set up like described at first, with a box and bulkhead fittings.

---A/Ts have a vent, but they are behind the Torque Converter. Unless you rig up an external vent while Torque Converter is out, that is the limit.

---Other than that, a good canvas or tarp wrapped over the hood of the truck and bungied down will make a nice air bubble for keeping the water out of the engine bay (thanks be to Aussies)... for a good while anyway.

---As mentioned, you want to keep the water out of the exhaust just as much as you do the carburetor (previous paragraph), so either steady RPMs around 1200 or stacks will prevent hydrolock.

---Be safe down there boys, and remember if you must go through water, try to take an angled approach, steering slightly toward the supply of water. Current against even the sheer face of a rim will be enough to push the vehicle... and the side of the body of an International is nothing short of sheer. If hard current hits the rocker panels broadside, combined with the rims, you'll undoubtedly be swimmin` with the fishes.

---Hope it soon recedes enough for comfort.
 

Darrell Tuxworth

High Wheeler
A few things to consider.
Measure from the ground to the bottom of your intake. Then measure from the ground to the same distance up your drivers front fender and see what that point is. Use this as a guide.
A clutch drive fan is better. It won't bend into the radiator as the water level rises and will keep fan spray down.
Keeping the RPM's low will slow the fan and thus fan spray at a minimum and if you get any water splash near the air cleaner intake the engine won't have near the airflow to suck it in. Don't lug the engine tho. It takes a considerable amount of power to get through water and you may encounter soft spots under the water that you may need to power through.
A slow and steady pace is much better than flying into it. You can go through water deeper than your hood for short distances at a slow steady pace because the front end creates a bow wave and will keep the water level in the engine bay below actual water levels a bit.
Most important is if you don't know how deep it is don't go in...but if you do...and the engine starts to suck in water shut if off immediately....It is easier to vacuum/dry out the interior from a stuck truck than it is to vacuum/dry out and rebuild the engine after you hydro locked the motor and bent a rod...
Darrell
 

Jay Tabor

Banned
a scout II cant drive thru anywater.
its the driver of the vehicle that drives the vehicle thru water.
ive driven thru standing water and flowing water, over the top of my tires . .30 inches.+

its capable of going thru water 4 or 5 foot deep, if you modify it enough.

snorkels, water tight ignition and gastank. vents high enough. etc . .
 

Carl Wiese

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
a scout II cant drive thru anywater.
its the driver of the vehicle that drives the vehicle thru water.
ive driven thru standing water and flowing water, over the top of my tires . .30 inches.+

its capable of going thru water 4 or 5 foot deep, if you modify it enough.

snorkels, water tight ignition and gastank. vents high enough. etc . .

You may want to add SCUBA or re-breather to that list.
 
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