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Project Fully Involved - 1969 IH 1300D Foundry Pump Truck

Kurt_M

Farmall Cub
Here is the page from the price book, it does show a code, I can't say that I've ever seen that appear on a line set. That "code" at the bottom on both line sets is the axle ratio, 487, and the primary paint color, 2150, IH red. That is standard procedure on most of the IH line sets.
paint.jpg
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Got a bit done over lunch!:
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One thing I now realize is that the axle shaft oil seal must be inward towards the carrier? I really think I should replace these but am a bit hesitant on removing the gearset. I have never messed with that before. Lots of clean up will take place Monday but I just ran out of time today.
 
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stroker3

Lives in an IH Dealership
Maybe C=Cab. O=Overall

I don't know...was thinking the same at first but what caught my eye on screen was the other C's in words like 'color' and 'cover' seem to have a rounder wider opening. The O's in those words look more round than the number zero does as well. I believe the center of the zero is more egg shaped/elongated than the letter 'O' and the last digit on mine has a clearly elongated shaped opening. I'm begining the think there's no letters in that code. It looks like they both simply end in 2150. Basically the paint code with the 487 before it.
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Welp, first measurable snow hit today. This pic was the first dusting. We got another 1-2 inches following.
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mallen

Y-Block King
T
I have not ordered a copy of the LST yet (it is on my list along with parts manual MT-124).
Yes, the tires on this truck were definitely outfitted at the Fire Apparatus Facility (Thibault). The steel wheels do not have IH stamps as I have seen in pics cruising Google. These tires have a contact patch of 1 foot so they are definitely an aftermarket setup.

Got a little more run time on the truck, it is very cold blooded right now. Dies when trying to shift from 1st to 2nd when cold. It idles but with misfires. In dire need of love this winter.
That IS the LST
 

mallen

Y-Block King
Got a bit done over lunch!:
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One thing I now realize is that the axle shaft oil seal must be inward towards the carrier? I really think I should replace these but am a bit hesitant on removing the gearset. I have never messed with that before. Lots of clean up will take place Monday but I just ran out of time today.
When you remove the gearset, make sure you keep track of where the parts go and which way they go. Its not a bad idea to use a scribe and Marie them, both position and orientation. You remove the axles. Then remove the bearing caps. They must be replaced exactly as they came out. You can then usually remove the carrier. There a spreader tool, but I have never used one. I've allways been able to get the carrier out without it. Once the carrier is out, use a long wooden dowl to knock out the seals. To put the seals back in, you use a bearing and seal driver. I used a dowel small enough to fit through the seal, and had a helper tap the dowel while I held the driver in place. It was easier than trying to talk the end of the driver inside the differential housing. I'm going to guess a 1300D has a Dana 70 up front. Mine has a D44 but I thing it goes the same way.
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
When you remove the gearset, make sure you keep track of where the parts go and which way they go. Its not a bad idea to use a scribe and Marie them, both position and orientation. You remove the axles. Then remove the bearing caps. They must be replaced exactly as they came out. You can then usually remove the carrier. There a spreader tool, but I have never used one. I've allways been able to get the carrier out without it. Once the carrier is out, use a long wooden dowl to knock out the seals. To put the seals back in, you use a bearing and seal driver. I used a dowel small enough to fit through the seal, and had a helper tap the dowel while I held the driver in place. It was easier than trying to talk the end of the driver inside the differential housing. I'm going to guess a 1300D has a Dana 70 up front. Mine has a D44 but I thing it goes the same way.
You are correct it is a Dana 70. I will have to keep plugging along then and get the drivers side disassembled and then move to the pumpkin.
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Another lunch update.
Clean Ball:
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Beginning cleaning the socket:
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Upper bushing & lower bearing:
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Some wear on the upper bushing:
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Clean axleshaft, really contemplating u-joint replacement as they are in excellent shape:
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Spicer joint:
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patrick r

Binder Driver
I wouldn't replace any old parts that are in good solid shape. Chances are those part(s) will last as long if not longer than anything you'd be replacing it with today.

Very nice work BTW.

X2


Looks great!

Given the mileage and history of the truck I doubt there will be a lot of parts that need to be replaced outside of normal maintenance items.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Started chiseling the bulk crud off the knuckle. More tomorrow. Also removed the brake line supports following this picture. I cant find any black beneath the red on the drivetrain. Really confusing me.
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Chris Cooper

High Wheeler
Nice truck, excellent thread! I'm staying tuned because I'll probably be working on the same components here pretty quick.

I sure wish my front springs were as straight & pretty as yours-- mine had a tow-truck winch on it which ruined them.
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Thanks! It's a diamond in the rough and will be a peach for sure after some work!

Trying to document to the extent practical as I just cant find much info on tear downs of the bigger old school 4wd trucks on the web. Figured some of the visuals would help others down the road, plus it's my way of project notes for reassembly.
 
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mjmck

Farmall Cub
Started to do some parts searching and for the most part seals, shoes, springs, wheel/master cylinders are cheap. However the 12 bolt closed knuckle seals are CRAZY at $120 each. Those might have to wait till after Christmas!
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Wanted to get some feedback on sand blasting drivetrain parts. My company has an old industrial blasting pot with black media inside currently. Was told this is the way to remove debris and rust from parts.

I'm sure you all know a 50 year old vehicle has debris caked on the drivetrain like concrete. I have to chisel and then wire wheel. Will the sand blaster handle this?
 

patrick r

Binder Driver
I know a little about it from taking items to have it done.
Yes it is probably the ideal way to clean and prepare metal for painting. Leaves it clean and abraded. How rough depends on the grit of the abrasive.
There are downsides though. If you only do small items, working within a cabinet is the way to go, look at Harbor Freight.
Doing it outside of a cabinet is messy. The abrasive goes EVERYWHERE! You will need the proper safety equipment, respirator, face shield etc. You do not want to breath the abrasive and dust generated. Not being able to reuse the abrasive will add up. The wet grease/oil should be cleaned off first. Larger parts will require a lot of air (big compressor).
All the above are reasons most people hire it out if the part won’t fit into a blasting cabinet.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Dana Strong

Lives in an IH Dealership
'm sure you all know a 50 year old vehicle has debris caked on the drivetrain like concrete. I have to chisel and then wire wheel. Will the sand blaster handle this?
Try using some kerosene, Gunk or even paint thinner (the old kind) to soften it so it can be scraped or brushed off. Spray some on and let it soak for hours, if needed, to allow it to penetrate to the bottom of the deposits. A pressure washer (or steam cleaner) will also do a good job of removing such deposits, probably without being softened first, although it may still help and speed the process up.
That black grit could be a number of things, from aluminum oxide to crushed cinders/slag from the steel mills. Effective sand (grit) blasting depends on a good, large compressor, and yes, a good respirator and eye protection is needed. For outside work, one can construct a framework of 2 x 4's and cover that with tarps & clear polyethylene (to allow light in) so the media can be recovered and reused. Fans and baffles can be used to blow fine dust away while preventing the larger grit from escaping, if neighbors aren't nearby to be bothered by the dust.
 

mjmck

Farmall Cub
Thank you both.

The plans were to do it at work so I have access to a monster Ingersoll compressor. I was going to do it outside and not recollect the media (due to the large amount of debris being blasted, resulting in major contamination). That's where I was worried about the expense of new media. I would be doing knuckles, hubs, steering components, drums, etc. Also agree on the PPE, we have some head socks and shields that I can use. The black media is the oxide which runs $50/50 lb sack of 70 grit.

Funny you mention the pressure washer Dana as that may be my best bet. I have an industrial Hotsy washer that I used to do a once over on the truck before moving it back here (in one of my previous pictures). I couldn't get access to a lot of the smaller areas under the truck due to the width of the wheels covering the components. In hindsight what I should have done was move the truck outside and place on jackstands, remove the tires and go to town. Thinking now as you said to soak the stuff in some solvent to help break it down and then attack with the pressure washer.
 
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