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Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - OBDR 2009

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
This truck was the subject of my closed knuckle D44 disk brake conversion. It turned into a mobile 'mosquito abatement district' not too long afterwards. Tons of blowby and lots of burnt oil out the tailpipe, so I parked it. At long last it's getting a fresh motor. One huge advantage of the '61 - '68 bodies is that the front clip was designed to come off as a unit for service access. The procedure is spelled out in the service manual, CTS-2300 in this case 'tho' it may be present in others(call Binder Books to check). In about an hour this truck got to the stage shown, I counted 31 bolts not including battery terminals, hose clamps or the screws for the fuel filler hoses. Note the exceptional access afforded to the engine. I was able to carve through 3 of 4 seriously rusted exhaust manifold to head pipe bolts with a Sawzall, #4 required a cutoff wheel in a die grinder 'cause I couldn't quite reach it with the Blade.
 

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MikeInMobile

High Wheeler
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - 'C' Series front clip R&R

Jim Grammer said:
This truck was the subject of my closed knuckle D44 disk brake conversion. It turned into a mobile 'mosquito abatement district' not too long afterwards. Tons of blowby and lots of burnt oil out the tailpipe, so I parked it. At long last it's getting a fresh motor. One huge advantage of the '61 - '68 bodies is that the front clip was designed to come off as a unit for service access. The procedure is spelled out in the service manual, CTS-2300 in this case 'tho' it may be present in others(call Binder Books to check). In about an hour this truck got to the stage shown, I counted 31 bolts not including battery terminals, hose clamps or the screws for the fuel filler hoses. Note the exceptional access afforded to the engine. I was able to carve through 3 of 4 seriously rusted exhaust manifold to head pipe bolts with a Sawzall, #4 required a cutoff wheel in a die grinder 'cause I couldn't quite reach it with the Blade.

Thats incredible Jim. I never knew that about the 61-68.

I really need a manual for the 68, though I do have the CTS 2303 for the D Travelall and the early Scout II manual.

Thanks for the quick lesson. :D

Nice looking project. PS, PB, A/C. Ah, the luxury of it all. :cool:

Mike
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - Engine removal

The engine and transmission are out, with the help of an engine tilter. I know, using the forklift is cheating, but what the heck :D
 

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WesV

Y-Block King
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - Engine removal

Jim Grammer said:
The engine and transmission are out, with the help of an engine tilter. I know, using the forklift is cheating, but what the heck :D

Fork lift is only half cheating, when you can use a knuckle boom on an S1800 and preciesly lift out and put in engines is "cheating" and I cheat all the time! :cool: :cool:
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

This weeks progress, here is the chassis after the 3rd pressure washing, going to #4. The drill: spray down with Oil Eater(Costco), let soak in, blast away. After #4 I think we'll be ready to paint :D
 

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DavidWTravelallfan

High Wheeler
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Call me stupid..But that frame looks the same as used in the 69-73 bodys as well..Mine looks like that..
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

DavidWTravelallfan said:
Call me stupid..But that frame looks the same as used in the 69-73 bodys as well..Mine looks like that..

They are, in fact, substantially the same.

Primer went on this AM, after pressure wash #4 last night and a thorough blow-down to force the water out of the nooks and crannies. Paint is good ol' Rustoleum rusty metal primer, from the cheap quart cans. Thinned about 25% and shot with a touchup gun. This ain't a show restoration(I don't even *own* a 'dry-wash' mitt :rolleyes: ), so no epoxy primer for this job! I have sags, runs and prolly some dry spots. Oh well, it's all gonna getted liberally fogged with black semi-gloss, and soon :D
 

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ScoutmanSV

Y-Block King
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

If I haven't told ya how jealous I am, before > I am now ... & if I did already, I am again. :eek: :p

FWIW: SII front ends can come off in 1 piece (minus hood) too. Takes ~ 2hrs w/air tools & not working too hard. Makes life much easier when one does a engine + trans + xfer install/removal. Inner fender bolts are the bear > have to pry the outer fender out to get inbetween the fenders (inner/outer) to the bolts w/an air ratchet ... hand ratchet = good luck. 35 ~ 40 body bolts total.

Looks like you're getting some sun there too. :D

:cool:
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Yup, been sweating like a pig all day :eek:

Warm and dry, perfect painting weather :D

Here's the first coat, at least one more to follow. Then I'll swap the tranny over to the new motor and drop the combo back in. I figger it'll be easier to swap over the engine accessories with everything at a nice comfortable working height. Gotta remember to hang the starter and rough plumb the tranny heat exchanger before I install the engine. Sure would be nice to run silicone hose(Goodyear Hi-Miler) for the exchanger, I'd prolly never need to change it again :) Guess I'll make a couple of calls...
 

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L

LeeC

Guest
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Jim -

Haven't been here in a long while. Great to see you've started on your '68 AWD Travelall. I've been waiting for this thread to start and will put it on my subscription list...

Just pulled my 68 on 72 Travelall 4x4 project out last week. Washed the frame/driveline donor 72 Travelall off with a hose and the battery is charging as I write this. Haven't ran this one for over a year. I parked it after partcially installing a Dana 44 HD 8-lug disc front with Hummer H2 wheel and tire take-offs (the off-set on these wheels takes back the 2" extra width nicely). Have a Corporate 14 bolt 8-lug rear disc with a new detriot locker that will eventually go in too. Hope to start her up next week. Got my fingers crossed that all is well like when she was parked...

A few months back I pulled the front clip off the 68 Travelall 4x4 in pieces, not as a whole. Damn, where were you then? :( (LOL) Much easier to do it the way you did! Oh well, to late... My knuckles have already healed :D . I will be cleaning up and primering each piece off the truck now that they are in workable sizes. Still don't know how I will be pulling the bodies off for the swap; 68 Travelall 4x4 body onto the 72 Travelall 4x4 frame/driveline :confused: Maybe a fork lift with boom will work???

Anyway, look forward seeing you progress. Care to share any preliminary plans for this 4x4 beast?

Cheers, Lee
 
L

LeeC

Guest
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Jim -

How's this project progressed over the last year? Saw you selling many of your IH's on ebay a while back. Have you cleaned the IH farm out (lol)?

I'm just about ready to start painting my frame up. Planned to use plan old oil based Rustoleum rattle cans, as I don't have a paint gun or compressor. Wally-Mart has rattle cans for $2.63 each. Any problem with gong the rattle can route?

Cheers, Lee
 

Doc Stewart

Content Team
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Have done lots of painting with rattle cans, Lee. I can make runs just as easily as with a spray gun!
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Now that the Metro's out of my hair it's time to get back to this mothballed project. Pulled it from parking to the prime work space last Thursday PM and staged both the 'new' engine and the one I pulled.

The engine going in is a long block from a SII parts truck. The only data points I got from the PO are 'rebuilt' and 'RV cam', both of which could mean pretty much anything :rolleyes: I ran it in the parts truck, and it sounded good, had oil pressure and didn't smoke. I swapped out the oil pan and pump from SII units to the truck style and got a peek inside. Nice and clean and reasonably fresh looking crosshatch in the bores, so maybe it's actually rebuilt. In any case it's better than what came out! Here's the result of 2-3 pressure washes, a bunch of red paint, 2 years of storage and a mystery dent in the valve cover:

IMG_8019.JPG


When I pulled the engine out of storage, something looked funny about the rear main seal. For one thing, it stood proud of the block surface. You can get away with that(sort of) with a 727 because of the flex plate spacer, but not with the Borg Warner flex plate. The seal needed to come out for inspection, here's the setup; self tapping screws and a slide hammer with a finger hook end:

IMG_8016.JPG


What's wrong with this pic?:

IMG_8018.JPG


Note the pulled out holes left by the puller screws, then take a look at the seal lips. It was installed backwards :eek: Oil seal 101 folks, the sealing lip goes *toward* the stuff you're sealing in!

That little error corrected, we hang the transmission:

IMG_8020.JPG


In she goes:

IMG_8023.JPG


Have I mentioned that you *really* need an engine tilter if you're going to do this stuff and retain your sanity? :)

Check the sporty new RPT engine mounts:

IMG_8024.JPG
 

IHtrucker

Farmall Cub
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Ohhh.. pretty.. what I am wondering is with the weather we are having, how are you getting sunny days???
Cheating?? No, no, no.. use what you got!! Looks good, hope you get it up and running soon!
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Don't worry, this hasn't gone dormant again :rolleyes: Getting the fiddly bits connected just isn't very exciting visually. I will share an approach that I take to engine swaps; when stripping out the old I work top to bottom, trying to take out a system at a time. Fuel(carb and fuel lines), then ignition wiring, engine driven accessories and so on. Going back in I reverse this and work from the bottom up; engine mounts, exhaust, driven accessories etc. Usually makes for an easier time of things.

New engine mostly dressed:

IMG_8051.JPG


A little later the front clip went back on:

IMG_8052.JPG


I've no idea about the original application for this horn, it was in the storage building when we bought the property. There's *just* enough room on the inner fender. This baby will part your hair!

IMG_8053.JPG
 

EDS

Binder Driver
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

I've not pulled the front clip for motor swaps but did when I converted my Travelette ('74, IFS)to 4wd. Very slick to work on.


It sucked when all the suspension was bolted up and ready to go and I couldn't go for a drive until the clip was back on. I am confident however that I was driving it sooner and with fewer headaches than if I had done all the work hunched over and on my back. I think I did better quality work also.

I stripped the donor truck to bare frame. With all those rivets to grind and punch I can't imagine doing that job any other way.

Scout II front clips are miserable to take off as a unit, or so it seems to me. D-series trucks are pretty easy.
 

John Donnelly

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Did you fire this one up yet to see if you can drive in style?

-John
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Did you fire this one up yet to see if you can drive in style?

Yes, in fact it purrs like a little baby kitten :) More to follow this afternoon...

If you get a chance, would you please scrub the 'new engine prep' from the thread title? This thread will be for the whole enchilada as we prep this truck for OBDR '09 ;)
 

Jim Grammer

Editor at large
Staff member
Moderator
Re: Project: 1100 AWD Travelall - New engine prep

Here's how I revive an engine that's been in long storage. If you're an old hand at this disregard, but the question seems to come up with regularity. In this case the engine was run by me before being cleaned, painted and set aside. At that time I shot oil in the cylinders knowing that the engine was going to sit awhile(just not 2 years! :rolleyes: ). If I wasn't already to that point, I would have made sure the engine was free and the bores well oiled.

Next comes pressure priming the oil system. I found a chunk of 1/2" rod stock cleaning out a corner of the shop, so I finally made myself a real oil pump driver:

IMG_8055.JPG


Pretty exciting, huh? :)

First I spin the oil pump up(fill the crankcase!) and verify that I'm making oil pressure in the main oil gallery. I knew the stock oil pressure gauge in this truck worked, otherwise I would have installed my test gauge in one of the main gallery ports. FWIW, this engine has a brand new oil pump that was installed bone dry and it primed just fine that way.

With the spark plugs out, battery connected and a remote starter switch in hand, I spin the oil pump and bump the engine over with the starter. Partial rotations at first, with the oil pump turning. If I was concerned about oiling to the top I'd pull the valve covers to observe. In this case I ran the engine when it was in the donor and had a peek then.

After you're primed, with the starter switch still connected put your finger over the spark plug hole on #8 and bump crank the engine slowly until it blows your finger off the hole. You should be close to the timing marks lining up. I put the damper mark on 0 at this point. This is now TDC on the compression stroke.

The distributor is ready to go in, making sure that you have either the 'real' distributor gasket or an equivalent o-ring installed. The oil pump drive tang on the distributor will engage the oil pump shaft before the distributor gear starts to mesh with the cam gear, so you can put the unit in part way and turn the rotor to position. I like to drop the distributor in so that the rotor points straight forward or maybe one notch clockwise. I then mark the distributor body on the outside at the center of the plug wire socket I'm going to use for #8 cylinder. Pull the cap back off, and then use that reference mark to position the distributor body so that the rotor is pointing directly at #8. This gets the ignition timing close enough to start the engine.

From there it's just a matter of making sure you have fuel, spark and air.

Air's kind of a no-brainer unless you have a giant rats nest in the intake manifold :eek:

Fuel I will often fake initially with a little starting fluid and a 'dribble bottle' of gas(twist top mustard bottles work great for this, especially Guldens :) ).

For spark, you really need to have an idea *how* your particular ignitition is *supposed* to work so you can verify the bits are working right. This is a points ignition, so I know a couple things right off the bat. One is that the points resistance will be too high because the engine's been sitting for 2 years and the point faces are oxidized. A couple passes with a point file takes the points resistance from 3.5 Ohms to about .2. I also know that the points should open enough to break the primary circuit, easy enough to check. Then you want at least 9V at the coil positive. 12V will work for short term testing if you need to hot wire to get it running. From there it's just a matter of doing the secondary wiring. Double check your plug wiring order, it's easy to, say, swap #1 and #8 when it's cold and dark and you're tired(now how do I know that?) :D

Anyway, it runs and sounds great. I have a fuel supply issue and a low voltage in the coil feed circuit to deal with, both trivial. I was happy to discover that the big ol' Bendix electric fuel pump that wasn't hooked up works fine, so I'm gonna do away with the mechanical altogether and just carry a Purolator 'buzz box' as a spare.

Gotta love the red Mallory plug wires, they were on some parts truck or another:

IMG_8056.JPG
 
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