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molybdenum disulfy

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1968SCOUT

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i heard that MOLYBDENUM DISULFY is a good treatment for blow by , now i dont know of this stuff or where i can get some to mix with my oil , if any body has anything to share i would greatfully apreciate it , or suggestions on something else i can use to slow it down a lil . thanks in advance ...
 

Greg R

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Moly has been around for decades as an additive for greases and gear oils. While it is very effective for boundary lubrication, I WOULD NOT use it in any engine.

You can not make up for wear or fill the gaps with any magic beans or snake oil!
 

Patrick Morris

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I believe it's actually disulfide, as in one molybdenum atom and two sulfur atoms. But anyway, like Greg indicated, it's been around for decades. I used to see it sold in tubes for use in gear boxes, marketed as "Moly Lube". Never heard of anyone putting it in their engine. But weirder stuff's been used in engines. Who else here remembers "ARCO Graphite" motor oil???
 
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big dave

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Moly wheel bearing grease is the perfect engine assembly lubricant. I've used it on cams, lifters, and bearings. It's especially good if the motor isn't started right away. The moly stays on where many assembly oils will drip off.
 

Greg R

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Let me be a bit clearer. Frankly I use the stuff quite a bit. It's in the greases I use, and I prefer the assembly lubes with it over just STP or other lubes I've used in the past. I tried "Power Punch" in the gear oil, but it settled out over time even with daily use. Bob has done a lot of homework on the subject of lubricating oils, and I respect a lot of what he says. But the fact of the matter is the original question:
i heard that MOLYBDENUM DISULFY is a good treatment for blow by

Blowby is from cylinder leakage; from whatever reason be it poor fit or alignment of the rings, fouling or deposits on the rings, wear, gaposis, etc. Adding a boundary lubricant ain't gonna fix that. And if the heavens were in order and Jupiter aligned with Mars, and such blowby was reduced by the additive; the next oil change would set the clock back to where you started. "Motor Honey" would be a better help to temporarily nurse a smoking engine.
 

WRENCH MAN

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Moly wheel bearing grease is the perfect engine assembly lubricant. I've used it on cams, lifters, and bearings. It's especially good if the motor isn't started right away. The moly stays on where many assembly oils will drip off.

MOLLY HT#2
 

Doc Stewart

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STP, Motor Honey and the like will postpone the inevitable for a little while.

Lubricants with sulfer in the molecule don't belong inside internal combustion engines. Heat + condensation moisture + pressure can breakdown the molecular structure rendering sulfuirc acid which is hard on steel. I do not know the stability of the Md2S molecule in those conditions. It is great stuff on bearings and sliding surfaces. You can get it as a powder for case lube in reloading ammunition. Its pressure quotient is greater than lithium as in 'white lithium grease'.

We used 'Moly' grease on the sliding surfaces of valves on an antique steam engine at the Natl Maritime Museum. Lasted longer than any other grease we tried.
 

Dana Strong

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Originally posted by Patrick Morris:
Who else here remembers "ARCO Graphite" motor oil???
I got a dozen cans of "ARCO Graphite" from the "Toxic Waste Warehouse" (usable stuff separated from the rest at a toxic waste turn-in) and found it to be good for the drip oilers of old one-lungers with 'ignitor' ignition systems; I suspect it might short out plugs with other systems. I heard that in regular automobile engines, this oil caused major leakage problems at seals.

I would not be surprised if MoS2 caused problems with catalytic converters, especially in oil of engines with excessive blow-by. It should also not be used in the oil of just-rebuilt engines, as it impedes the proper seating of rings.
 

1968SCOUT

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thanks for all the great input i apreciate it , mine does not smoke as of yeat other than at start up after its been running for a while , i will try the honey stuff at next oil change (i should have mentioned it this is not on my scout :flowers:)
 

Greg R

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mine does not smoke as of yeat other than at start up after its been running for a while
Could be valve seals. I had a 'Yota that did that real bad. Reconditioned the heads and all is well.

We used 'Moly' grease on the sliding surfaces of valves on an antique steam engine at the Natl Maritime Museum.
Doc, have you worked on the Jeremiah O?
 

Brian Huver

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You guys are going right down my ally. I work with Molybdenum all day long. I live, eat and drink moly. What I have found with moly is that if you actually use too much it will act as a cleaner, which could do a lot of damage in an engine, like eat the seals and corrode. I have seen it happen sometimes and it isn't pretty !! Also, molybdenum is used basically like what all of you have said, it puts a thin coat of film like a wax on that inside of the engine.

If you guys have anymore questions feel free to ask, I work in the chemical feild.

Brian
 

jeff rotella

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I got a dozen cans of "ARCO Graphite" from the "Toxic Waste Warehouse" (usable stuff separated from the rest at a toxic waste turn-in) and found it to be good for the drip oilers of old one-lungers with 'ignitor' ignition systems; I suspect it might short out plugs with other systems. I heard that in regular automobile engines, this oil caused major leakage problems at seals.

I would not be surprised if MoS2 caused problems with catalytic converters, especially in oil of engines with excessive blow-by. It should also not be used in the oil of just-rebuilt engines, as it impedes the proper seating of rings.

I used Arco graphite in my '78 Scout when it was new.(My sister owned an Arco station and she was trying to make a sales goal.) It leaked so bad it turned the whole outside of the motor black, along with my hands.
 

Patrick Morris

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I used Arco graphite in my '78 Scout... It leaked so bad it turned the whole outside of the motor black, along with my hands.
That's what I remember most distinctly about it. Man, it sure left a permanent stain on everything it touched. I guess it might have been responsible for the first few leaks in my '77 Subaru's little 1600.
 

Thomas

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---I have considered and I am still considering Xado cylinder repair gel. I haven't found any claims that Cermet doesn't* work. Maybe SAE.org should get onto it, because it sure sounds good... like magic beans do at this moment. I'd better get to work before I get hungry.
 

Doc Stewart

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Greg: No, I haven't worked on the Jeremiah O'Brian. I put some time in the engine room of the 1906 Steam tug Hercules there. I was an Oiler which is one step above Wiper which is one step above dirt....

If you visit, that loooong drive shaft is so shiny because I spent an entire voyage from Sausalito to Vallejo running emery cloth along it while it spun at about 80 rpm.

The valve gear slides and the rod big ends are lubed while underway with an oil can and some adept aiming. Boy howdy, are you filthy after the voyage. Small wonder they called us the black gang.
 

willy

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You guys are going right down my ally. I work with Molybdenum all day long. I live, eat and drink moly. What I have found with moly is that if you actually use too much it will act as a cleaner, which could do a lot of damage in an engine, like eat the seals and corrode. I have seen it happen sometimes and it isn't pretty !! Also, molybdenum is used basically like what all of you have said, it puts a thin coat of film like a wax on that inside of the engine.

If you guys have anymore questions feel free to ask, I work in the chemical feild.

Brian

We have this Moly thing covered, I have mined, crushed and milled the grey gold. It put food on the table while I was growing up.
 

Greg R

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The valve gear slides and the rod big ends are lubed while underway with an oil can and some adept aiming. Boy howdy, are you filthy after the voyage. Small wonder they called us the black gang.

You can say that again, though I've heard tell it came from the coal days. Afters years with geared turbine in the Navy and a short stint in the Merchants, it was VERY cool to witness Triple Expansion and everything recip'in on the Jeremiah. There I learned what it meant to be an "Oiler", that was work on those ships. Nowadays it's pretty much a messenger watch and coffee mak'in.
 

Dan Phariss

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i heard that MOLYBDENUM DISULFY is a good treatment for blow by , now i dont know of this stuff or where i can get some to mix with my oil , if any body has anything to share i would greatfully apreciate it , or suggestions on something else i can use to slow it down a lil . thanks in advance ...

Sounds like BS to me.
It is used in compression rings.
Filter will remove it, or it could plug oil passages.
Its great stuff when used someplace where it will actually work. But loose moly not something you want in an engines oil system.
If you have excess blowby or high oil consumption it needs rings most likely.
Or a rebuild.

Dan
 
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