BinderPlanet.com

Welcome to BinderPlanet.com the World's Premier IH Website.

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

MiniBuild #15 ~ Kirk A.

Friends of BinderPlanet Facebook Group

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
If ya'll have been paying attention to the other build threads, you've noticed that I've been updating them like a mad-man. Well, this thread is next, so stay tuned.
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Okay, lets see what we can do...

Okay. Previously, we covered the new dash panel that we'll be putting into this Scout. We designed it, and had it custom built using a CNC waterjet. Came out great, and the gauges look very good, but lets put a shine on that panel before installing it.

First, we use a 'roll-lock' wheel normally used to clean up gasket surfaces. This doesn't normally remove material, but with aluminum, its enough to 'buff' it.
mb15_60.jpg


With it on the end of a drill, we simply hold it to the aluminum and make a series of circles till we get the desired effect. Some guys use over-lapping circles in a rigid pattern, I like the randomness of free-hand.
mb15_61.jpg


Above is the unfinished panel, below is the glove-box door already done.
mb15_62.jpg


Then they were sent to coat for some good old-fashion clear glossy powdercoating ~ this will make them easy to keep clean and shiny!
mb15_63.jpg


Walla!~
mb15_64.jpg


Moving right along, lets get into the tires. We've showed you guys the rim/tire combination before mounting things, lets take a look at where they are now.

Its nice knowing the GM at the local 4WheelParts. He hooks me up pretty good with 'odd' services ~ as he knows which techs will work 'on the side'. Since Vegas is getting Staun's internal beadlocks, things can get complicated, so I take them to the guys who've done them 1000x. Since 4WP has the machines necessary to drill the rim, install the Staun, mount the tire and then balance the rim/tires its simply cheaper to send them off to have done. Had these been traditional beadlocks, we could have done them at the shop...

Regardless, having given them a week or two to do them, I went an picked them up.
mb15_65.jpg


I love driving with big tires in the back of the T-ette ~ dont' know why, just do...
mb15_66.jpg


In case you guys had forgotten, Vegas is loaded with some BFGs!
mb15_67.jpg


Actual KRAWLERs to be exact!
mb15_68.jpg

Unlike the look-alike MT/KM-2's the Krawlers were developed for hard-core wheeling. The thread blocks are thicker, and the voids between the lugs are wider. They may be a little louder on the road, but they'll hook up extremely well off-road.

Mmmmmm ~
mb15_69.jpg
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Set of five, just waiting for some fun!
mb15_70.jpg


Meanwhile, there has been much more important things being done to the Scout than just getting the wheels/tires mounted up. Here's Dylan ~ a recent graduate from WyoTech and local Scout nut who wanted to see if I needed any help around the shop. Just like Jayson in the Sonny build, we certainly put him to work!
mb15_71.jpg


Previously we had removed the transfercase from Vegas so that we could get it rebuilt. But Kirk had something else in mind for the powertrain. Instead of keeping the T19 close w/ Dana20, we found a T19 WIDE w/ Dana300 from a 1980 Scout Terra deisel for sale and we just couldn't pass that up. So we changed things up a bit, and with the trans supported..
mb15_72.jpg


We removed the Close-box....
mb15_73.jpg


Although its a little dirty, this thing is in surprisingly good shape.
mb15_74.jpg


Then the whole clutch assembly was taken out to get freshen'd up a bit.
mb15_75.jpg


Wouldn't you know, Par for course! Like the rest of the Scout, the clutch was still in real decent shape.
mb15_76.jpg

But seriously, even though it would have 'worked' ~ its best to do the clutch while you have everything taken apart. A few hundred extra, but it'll be completely rebuilt and in 100% working order this way.

Besides, doing the clutch while you have the trans out is MUCH better than putting it all back together then finding out the clutch wasn't as good as it looked.

More updates soon. LOTS of progress, so we'll have to keep things rockin...
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Well, lets keep this thread going shall we?

Its time to start considering what we are doing with Vegas. Vegas will be an 800 version of Cringer ~ so its going to need to get power steering, coil-over front suspension, and several other things that will require ROOM in the engine bay. That means, we've got to get the fenders off this thing so that we can work more easier...
mb15_80.jpg


Front clip coming off...
mb15_81.jpg


Perhaps I never really notice how little room is in a Scout 800. Check this next picture out...
mb15_82.jpg

With the built 392 in there, there's no room at all in there for the stuff we've got to add. So it was decided to loose the inner fenders in the same fashion of Extreme Buildup 2 and 3.

So we took a measurement from two easy spots in the engine bay to get the measurement for our 'tubular' inner fender replacements.
mb15_83.jpg


With the measurement written on the radiator support (which will stay) we can make sure we re-create it when everything goes back together.
mb15_84.jpg


Then Dylan started cutting.
mb15_85.jpg


Man its such a clean Scout, it was kinda painful to do this...
mb15_86.jpg


Progress?
mb15_87.jpg


Well, the goal is to retain as many of the stock fender and front clip bolt holes as possible. So we manuvered the cuts to retain as many as possible.
mb15_88.jpg


Here's it is without the inner fenders.
mb15_89.jpg
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Just so you guys know, we didn't JUST start cutting this thing apart. Even if you are opposed to it, there are ways to do it that'll keep the structural integrity of the 'inner' body. First and foremost, you'll notice that we purposely didn't cut the stock seams. Keeping them intact, means the body is as strong as it has always been.
mb15_90.jpg


Even in the front, the seams were left ~ even when it meant leaving 1/2"-1" on the radiator support.
mb15_91.jpg


How much room is there now?
mb15_92.jpg

Plenty.

Here's another shot.
mb15_93.jpg


But that begs the question, we just cut out a bunch of metal, how are we going to 'sure' it back up?

Well, lets show you. After making some templates with cardboard, there's Dylan cutting out reinforcing plates for both the radiator support and tub.
mb15_94.jpg


Once cut, the plates were held up to the body...
mb15_95.jpg


...and we used a pen to mark the coverage.
mb15_96.jpg

Then we wire-wheeled the paint off, and lined back up the plates.
mb15_97.jpg


And started welding.
mb15_98.jpg


For some reason, the stock rubber 'seal' didn't like the welder much.
mb15_99.jpg
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Here's the way the welding turned out. I have to say that I'm always impressed with how well Scout sheet metal stands up to welding. Seriously, if there were a .... lesser vehicle.... you couldn't simply weld plate to the body like this.
mb15_100.jpg

That is the 100th picture in this thread!

Here's the plate on the tub side. Notice on both plates we contoured them to give the best coverage.
mb15_101.jpg


Then comes the tube....
mb15_102.jpg

This takes quite some time to makes sure you match the original measurement between the tub and the radiator support. But its extremely important you do. If you don't, the fenders won't bolt back on!

Welding in.... Radiator side.
mb15_103.jpg


...and tub side.
mb15_104.jpg


And now we have a PERFECT ground strap for the tub and radiator support ~ after all, there's another side to do!
mb15_105.jpg


Here's some pictures of how much room the stock inner fenders take up. It's crazy how.... in the way ... these things are.
mb15_106.jpg


Another shot. Boy, looking at these....really makes you think about how much stuff we'll be replacing/upgrading on this old Scout.
mb15_107.jpg


Speaking of which, we are going to be removing pretty much everything in the engine bay, if anyone needs anything we won't be using ~ say the good MasterCylinder and Proportioning Valve, or the stock V8 steering box...or whatever, let us know! Otherwise they are going to the recyclers.
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Lets take a look at how much room we've opened up in the engine bay by removing the inner fenders. From the front....
mb15_108.jpg

...you can really see the difference. Before the inner fenders took EVERYTHING from the fender to the headers. Now we've got plenty of room for any add-ons that Kirk wants.

From the side you can really see what kinda room this mod 'open's up for you...
mb15_109.jpg

..but you probably noticed the next problem.

Yes, the frame has two big problems. First, its filthy with 40+ years of dirt and grime. Second, those stock shock and bump-stop mounts aren't just ugly, they're in the way.

Petie, the Plasma Torch, was brought into play here. Goal, cut everything off the frame w/out cutting into the frame...
mb15_110.jpg


Then Dylan ground it down for quite a while.
mb15_111.jpg

its amazing how long it takes to clean up a frame, but time spent here is well worth the investment.

Looking much better as we prep for paint.
mb15_112.jpg


For now, we're just using some self-etching primer. This stuff will keep the rust away and can easily be sanded off when we're ready to weld on the shock and steering mounts.
mb15_113.jpg


The other side got the same treatment. First came cutting and grinding.
mb15_114.jpg


Then came primer...
mb15_115.jpg

mb15_116.jpg
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
Honestly, all this cutting isn't required for the XLC conversion. If you want to keep your inner fenders, then technically all you're required to cut out is what needs to be removed for mounting the suspension mounts, such as the shock hoops and track-bar mount.

However, on Vegas, its not just getting the XLC system. Its getting a host of things. Including power steering. And not just PS, but Ram-assist steering. So lets start covering that.

First, we needed a good power steering box. I use the Scout II saginaw boxes, but you can use whatever box your heart desires. Considering Misty (MiniBuild #12) is getting parted out (mostly), I had this fine working Scout II box available, so I used it.
mb15_117.jpg


Vegas has a 392 V8 in it already, Misty has a 345. Since they both share power steering mounts, we are using Misty's power steering pump and brackets too.
mb15_118.jpg


But as for the box. This thing has looked better ~ You can always tell when Scouts' had power steering issues. The box is normally covered in grime.
mb15_119.jpg

The problem comes when your pushing big tires, the steering heats up, causing the fluid to expand. This expansion causes it to over-flow from the reservoir ~ which literally covers the box. While wheeling, the dust kicked up from the tires, mixes with the fluid, creates a paste and when dried, looks like this.

So we'll be cleaning it back up. Actually, *I* won't be cleaning it up. Since we're using Ram-assist steering, the box needs to be relatively disassembled (aka, the pitman arm taken off) and sent off for porting. I use Matt @ WestTexas Offroad (maker of the famous Red-Neck Ram) for my steering box rebuilds and porting. Sure, there are some out there ~ even within the Scout world ~ that do it, I've always had great service and product from him. So I'd rather use who I trust, and I trust Matt.

Since it gets taken apart when they port it, we opt to have them completely rebuilt as well. Yes, its a little more expensive, but it'll be 100% when doen. But first, the pitman arm.

To take the pitman arm off you just need to take off the nut, and pull it off. Easy enough right? Ya...you wish. Go ahead and beat on it for a while. Try swearing if it makes you feel better ~ but in the end, the only way to take it off, is with a pitman arm puller. Which looks like this......
mb15_120.jpg


Install it like so...
mb15_122.jpg


And use an impact to operate the puller.
mb15_121.jpg

Yes, you can TRY to do it with a wrench on the puller. But good luck holding the box while you do. Seriously, you'll spend 2 minutes with the puller and an impact ~ or 1+ hours with a wrench and hammer.

With the box taken apart, we put it in a few trash bags (to keep it from leaking in shipment) and put it in a box and sent it to Matt. While we wait for it's return, lets move on to the suspension.

Please note, and I'll say it again later, but please note that this is the first 800 specific XLC installation we've done. Up to this date, this conversion has been used on Scout IIs. So there are a couple things that you'll actually see being done, where if you get a kit, they are already pre-assembled/welded.

That said. One of the hardest things to do when putting together an XLC system and installing it is proper frame preparation. I choose to remove all mounts from the frame and grind them down as seen previously in the build. However, its not enough JUST to remove the mounts that occupy the same space as the frame sleeves. You really have to smooth them out. My frame sleeves are pretty exact when it comes to fitment. So if you leave welding nubs on the frame left over from the mounts you just removed, you'll have to FORCE the sleeve over them. On the driver side I spent a good 2 hours BEATING the frame sleeve on. And man, it was NOT FUN.

For the passenger side, I decided to spend some more time with the grinder. Here's the problem. Even after the old mounts are removed and smoothed, you have to take into account the factory's weld job. The box frame we have is actually two C-channels welded on top of each other with the "C" shape cupping each other. Take a look.
mb15_123.jpg


You can see that although the welds are fairly smooth, they also are thicker in some places than in others. This makes a 'high' point which, like on the driver side, I had to BEAT the sleeve over. This time I took an additional 5 minutes of grinding and knocked down all those high-points. With the extra grinding the frame didn't look too much different than it did when I simply removed and ground-smooth the mounts.
mb15_124.jpg


But when I went to slide the frame sleeve on...
mb15_125.jpg


... it was a totally different story. The sleeve litterally went right on, and ALL THE WAY on. It was awesome, insead of using the c-clamp to hold one side in place while I beat the other side, I had to use them to keep the sleeve from literally falling off.
mb15_126.jpg
 

Damian Grihalva

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 14, 2002
Messages
2,158
Points
38
Location
Colorado Springs
With my standard disclaimer that you need to double-check the clutch splines and all, they interchange.

Speaking of which, the tranny guy called and the trans/t-case are ready for pickup. The trans needed new syncro's and such, so we had a complete rebuild done. The D300 was in fine shape, so we only had the seals replaced and it properly put back together. Hoping to get things back and installed soon.
 

Hammie

Farmall Cub
Joined
Apr 29, 2013
Messages
15
Points
0
Location
new waverly,tx
So... anything to add or any finished pics of this rig?? Its like watching a movie that ends right after the action packed fight scene!
 
Top