BinderPlanet.com

Welcome to BinderPlanet.com the World's Premier IH Website.

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Heritage 800B Restore

2021 Arizona International Harvester Rendezvous

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
The Story:

This Scout is an 800 B, built in August of 1970. My Grandfather ordered it on July 24th 1970 from the local IH dealer to replace his 1960 Scout. The Scout 80 went through two axle shafts and apparently neither he nor his wife or daughter were comfortable with shafts breaking on logging roads in the Olympic mountains, which was more common on the first production models. If I am not mistaken, they were mainly equipped with similar running gear as the jeeps of the time, Dana 35s. Grandpa took delivery of it on August 25th, 1970 and had the dealer transfer the brush guard and skid plate from the old 80 to the new 800.

He used it as his daily driver for many years after he retired from the Navy, which is to say that he took it down to the local tavern and hauled firewood and other such necessities that retirees need to survive. Fortunately he kept it in the garage when not in use, but he was never afraid to use it hard- the only places the truck did not have mud or grease was on the bottom side of the frame which was kept clean by dragging on the rough logging roads. I felt obligated to keep the license plate frames, the front one reads “Unemployed? Hungry? Eat your Foreign Car” and the rear, “Cats flattened while you wait.”

The first time I recall riding in the Scout was when I was four or five, and my brother a year older. We were both unruly little fellows, and my mother had no time or intentions of keeping us well mannered, or well groomed. My Grandfather, being the career Sailor that he was, would not tolerate unruly haired children so he took us down to the barber shop every other Sunday for a trim. My brother and I enthusiastically jumped into the back seat of the Scout to enjoy the best view any kid ever had: panoramic windows and an unobstructed view of the world from the back seat of an American icon. There were no better times for us than loading up in the Scout to go collect wood, get haircuts, or shoot at the range.

When I turned 13, my grandfather had a massive heart attack and it slowed him down some for a time. I was growing fast and had more energy than a lab puppy after chow, so the best thing my Grandfather could do was take me to the woods and let me chop up wood for the winter. When we got to his old property, he got out of the Scout and told me to take his seat. He hopped in the passenger side and told me, “I ain’t got insurance for no minors, so don’t go hitting anything.” I was sold. I drove that monster all over the property, chopping up wood and loading it as fast as I could, just to get the chance to drive the Scout again.

My Father had no such love of the Scout, and it was relegated to the far reaches of the garage shortly thereafter. My brother and I did an Eagle Scout project that needed many planks of wood moved for making trails through the wetlands, and we built the planks up at Grandpa’s property and hauled them into place with the Scout. I was too young for a learner’s permit, and my brother had no predilection for one, so my dad was stuck driving. He must have locked up the brakes four times in the first trip, and that was in the summer with great road conditions. I learned several combinations of four letter words that still serve me quite well today over the course of that project. After we finished, the Scout did not move much until I got my driver’s license.

I asked my Grandfather to hold onto the Scout until such a time as I was able to properly house it, and thankfully he obliged. After my third tour overseas, I was stationed near enough to tow the Scout to my new home back in 2007. It was in fairly rough shape, but still turned over and ran if given the proper incentives. I thoroughly cleaned the exterior, stripped all of my youthfully applied wax, and put it in the back of my own shop where I had hoped to begin the process of restoring it. That day never came, what with marriage, kids, and overseas orders to contend with. The Scout ended up sitting at the back of my shop for the past 13 years with nothing changed aside from the gradually thickening layer of dust.

After move upon move, deployment after deployment, I recently had the time and the space to bring it back over to my Grandfather’s house, where I now reside. It was a harrowing trip where a tire or two blew out on the trailer, and the winch to get the Scout onto it broke mid pull, but I finally have it home. Now the trick is to get it restored.

The Technical:

As soon as I got my (adult) hands on this truck, I knew it was unique. It is a late production 800 B, and as such, does not necessarily share much with the earlier 800s. I have all the literature (all three LSTs, and even the owner’s manual for the radio) and have a solid history of the truck. As it sits, it has 50,1XX miles, and has never had any major component rebuild. The build specs are as follows:

Engine: 304 SV

Transmission: 3 Speed Auto B&W (not a Torque Flight 727)

Body: Travel Top

Options: AM Radio, carpeted interior

The 304 without power steering and power brakes speak to my Grandfather’s cheap nature, but apparently the four cylinder or manual transmission were not to his taste. I have no idea what those options would have cost, but the original purchase price was $3420.00 in 1970.

The rebuild started with the fluids, and they were all terrible. Turns out, a truck that sits for 20ish years has bad stuff going on. First thing I did was pull the radiator, replace the water pump, clean the thermostat housing, replace all the coolant hoses, and just about anything the coolant touched.

Next up was the fuel system: the tanks were drained, lines blown out (who knew that the fuel lines are so long? God damned passenger tank line goes over the driveshaft before it meets the selector valve!) And the fuel pump was rebuilt. Here is a nugget of wisdom: the 800B with vacuum wipers has a vacuum pump built into the fuel pump. They are not readily available as a complete unit, but the pump is rebuildable with cheap components from Amazon. The glass fuel bowl is the same as a Massey Ferguson (or Ford) tractor, and if you purchase a compass cutter razor and neoprene fuel rated gasket kit, you can reproduce every gasket in the pump for under $20.

The leaks were legion and they were next. I replaced everything from the lifter galley pan on up. For such low mileage, I expected less sludge but everywhere I looked the engine was coated in heavy deposits that speak closer to 150,000 miles than 50k. Grandpa must not have kept up on his oil changes. I did not disassemble the valve train but cleaned everything the best I could with it assembled. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. A high detergent oil and more frequent oil changes will fix some of those issues anyhow. The undercarriage was a nightmare of 50 years of leaks; in some places the oil and mud buildup was over two inches thick. That took some scraping and not a little bit of hell from my shop hand who had to use the bay after me.

The wiring is still an issue, and it appears that someone not quite up to muster has been hacking at it before. The alternator connections were poorly crimped, and turns out the park/neutral safety switch ones were as well, causing the truck not to start in park. If you must replace wiring, use proper crimp connections and tools. A solid double crimp pair of crimping pliers is $15 on Amazon, and will save you thousands of miles in headache. Also, use heat shrink at every terminal to keep water and dirt out. These two things will save any professional or DIY guy much heartache. The NSS is up above the transmission on these models, and is not easily accessible from the cab; I recommend that if you are having issues like this, that you get it on a lift to really assess the switch connections. There is no boot or shielding preventing corrosion from normal undercarriage debris on the switch, so when I replace the connections I will RTV the hell out of it.

On the suspension, the leaf spring shackles have all rotted out, which I have replaced some of using bushings I had laying around. I would appreciate the ever loving day out of someone who can give me the energy suspension part number for the exact right ones, but I have been using the front (front lower position) control arm bushings out of an ‘84 Camaro as a replacement. They require some trimming and grease, but function well when in place.

The fuel filler necks on both tanks decided to leak, which was not pleasant when trying to fill it up in my garage. After inspection, the plastic fill hoses had deteriorated where the hose met the tank. I had a too short Gates brand upper radiator hose for the Scout that had identical bends and diameter to the fuel hose, so that was as simple as a cut and fit operation. I saw that the OE replacement filler necks were running about $130 on Scout parts, just order an upper radiator hose and it will salvage both tanks. The hoses are rated for coolant and may crack sooner than those rated for fuel, however a silicon replacement would be an even better lasting replacement.

The transmission is some nature of Borg and Warner auto, not sure exactly which. The dipstick tube threads directly into the pan, which is a pain, but makes draining it easier. There is no filter in this transmission, just a pickup screen. After taking it apart, I had thought there was no magnet in the pan either, but upon closer inspection I found one hiding up on top of the valve body. I guess with cast iron, you can do that as most modern valve bodies are aluminum. There was no specification I could find for fluid capacity, but the IH manual said that it was rated for Dexron fluid. I use Valvoline Maxlife exclusively in my shop and have found it exceptionally good for any transmission requiring dex/merc, and this one is no different. Seven (yep, 7) quarts later, I was at the full mark when hot. Who knew? The transmission has an external cooler mounted to the top passenger side that has coolant running to it from the water outlet housing via 10 linear feet of 5/8” hose. This all had to be replaced, and the cooler is probably susceptible to the same failures radiators are. Ill look into a replacement unit that performs the same but hopefully won’t let coolant into my transmission.

As Porky the Pig says, “That’s all Folks” for the time being. Thanks for reading, and International for life.
 

Attachments

  • DSC_0068.JPG
    DSC_0068.JPG
    417.3 KB · Views: 91
  • DSC_0070.JPG
    DSC_0070.JPG
    331.2 KB · Views: 84
  • DSC_0071.JPG
    DSC_0071.JPG
    306.6 KB · Views: 80
  • DSC_0076.JPG
    DSC_0076.JPG
    290.8 KB · Views: 84
  • DSC_0083.JPG
    DSC_0083.JPG
    329.3 KB · Views: 81
  • DSC_0086.JPG
    DSC_0086.JPG
    326.2 KB · Views: 80
  • DSC_0105.JPG
    DSC_0105.JPG
    278.4 KB · Views: 80
  • DSC_0134.JPG
    DSC_0134.JPG
    290 KB · Views: 82
  • DSC_0135.JPG
    DSC_0135.JPG
    297.9 KB · Views: 86
  • DSC_0133.JPG
    DSC_0133.JPG
    290.9 KB · Views: 84

Dana Strong

Lives in an IH Dealership
Joined
Apr 4, 2008
Messages
6,144
Points
113
Location
Sunnyvale, Ca.
I still have an animal to take care of and it's already a bit late here so will only add a few quick comments.
Generally, Scoutparts and its other versions are not a safe and reliable source of supplies.
What is the number stamped on your fuel pump? Mine (late 800B w/ 304 & folding windshield) is a Carter 4983S and has an air piston, not a diaphragm. Parts are available from Then&Now, often mentioned on this site.
I can look up original-type spring bushing part numbers tomorrow, but any LightLine dealer will know exactly what you need, including modern versions with urethane (vs rubber) which many people prefer as a substitute.
The original tank filler tubes were rubber and are long unavailable, but suitable (non-heater hose) replacements have been written about here, to. Searching works better using an outside (non-site, e.g. google) function using this format:
subject terms site:Binderplanet.com​
 

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
Thanks all for reading and enjoying. The paint is original and the top has never been pulled off, at this point it may as well be welded on. I did find the proper leaf spring shackle bushings (Part number Prothane 91003) they were inexpensive and in stock at the manufacturer's website. Looks like most other suppliers are out of stock or asking a significant mark up, to include any of the Scout specific dealers. As far as the pump goes, it is doing great and the whopping 16 dollars at amazon is tough to beat for a set of gaskets and the future ability to make them for other projects. I often repair outboards, which the parts suppliers seem to think are made out of gold, so having the ability to properly cut radius gaskets for carbs or what have you is great. Happy thanksgiving all!
 

Dana Strong

Lives in an IH Dealership
Joined
Apr 4, 2008
Messages
6,144
Points
113
Location
Sunnyvale, Ca.
I'd still like to know the number stamped into the flange of your pump, if you can see it; mine seems to have been a fairly rare version and wasn't listed in the Parts Book, so far as I can tell.
 

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
So I managed to get a bit of work done on the Scout between the massive load of other work currently at the shop. New heater hoses and a set of well deserved new tires on top of new spring bushings front and rear. Prothane was out of stock for the black bushings and called me the day I placed my order to see if red was an acceptable substitute, which is fine by me. I had the bushings delivered and installed less than four days later, all 12, in about two hours. The job is stupid simple with just a floor jack, a ratchet strap, and a sawsall. The ball joint press helped a bit as well to get the new bushings compressed to fit within the old brackets. The bushing kits cost a total of $42 shipped, and covered every spring and shackle eyelet on the truck.

The tires are larger than I wanted to go, but 235/75R15 in the BFG A/T KO was back ordered country wide. I ended up with some 30x9.5R15 tires for the same price. The tires are NOT a good fit for the factory 6" wide rims, and have a ballooning effect on the tread. I noticed especially driving home that the rear end wanted to skid more than the old 235 wranglers ever had. Another difference from going from a "P" tire to a modern LT is the sidewall stiffness, which was readily apparent in cornering. These tires are stiff, and perform more like a bias ply for rigidity in corners, but grip tenaciously when encountering any obstacle and conform and ride better over rough terrain. I inflated them all to 30, but will likely switch to 35 in the front and 28 in the rear to better distribute traction and tread contact.

The engine was running hotter than expected on the drive home, but mostly due to the replacement of all the heater and transmission cooler hoses. The auto Spicer transmission has a quart sized oil to water cooler on it, and takes time to bleed air out of. I find it interesting that in 1970 the engineers moved the coolant to the transmission and hot air from under the hood to the cabin, and now we move transmission fluid to under the hood and coolant into the cab and rear of SUVs. Two very different approaches to solve the same problem, and I am unsure which is practically better or lasts longer. The heater core in a Scout is far easier than any modern vehicle I have ever encountered, that much I can say.

More to follow over the holidays, a Marine and his Scout rarely rest. Stay well and salty all.
 

Attachments

  • DSC_0143.JPG
    DSC_0143.JPG
    321.9 KB · Views: 39
  • DSC_0144.JPG
    DSC_0144.JPG
    316.4 KB · Views: 41

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
Disappointing end to the week, the alternator I tossed in to the engine crapped out on the way home Friday. It was a remanufactured Delphi unit from Rock Auto, and the return shipping is almost as much as I paid for the unit. Not happy at all with that deal, but for a $40 alternator I am not sure what else to expect. Napa has it in stock for $60, so I figure after shipping the defective one back I will be at about $100 for a working unit. Not ideal, but also not nearly the cost of one alternator for my power stroke, so it could be worse.
 

Chris Cooper

High Wheeler
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
1,253
Points
113
Location
Longmont, CO
Disappointing end to the week, the alternator I tossed in to the engine crapped out on the way home Friday. It was a remanufactured Delphi unit from Rock Auto, and the return shipping is almost as much as I paid for the unit. Not happy at all with that deal, but for a $40 alternator I am not sure what else to expect. Napa has it in stock for $60, so I figure after shipping the defective one back I will be at about $100 for a working unit. Not ideal, but also not nearly the cost of one alternator for my power stroke, so it could be worse.
Is there a place locally you could take it for a remedial rebuild? It might be cheaper than the combination of shipping, and purchasing another.
 

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
I ended up installing the one I took out just a few weeks ago after cleaning it up. I took the faulty unit apart and found a terrible solder job on the main terminal to positive that had disintegrated. I can fix it, when I get around to it.

Got another few projects done like installing new fuel sending units, rebuilding the neutral safety switch, and installing a new washer bottle. I scored a NOS washer bottle on ebay for $50 shipped, even came with the IH stock tag and box, felt pretty lucky getting my hands on that. Overpriced for a chunk of plastic I know, but every time I had a friend look under the hood they would make fun of the old yellow cracking plastic bottle. The NSS in these guys is easy to rebuild as well, a bit of electrical cleaner and dielectric grease and now I can start the scout in park again.

Next project: Fixing another fuel leak from the passenger side fuel filler tube, looking into new rims, and perhaps welding up a new exhaust. Who knows, with all the rain we are getting here, maybe Ill pull the transmission and transfer, rebuild those, and fix the leaking rear main at the same time. Thanks for all the help on finding parts from the other binder heads on here, that takes me way more time and effort than the actual work.
DSC_0189.JPG DSC_0190.JPG
 

800bman

High Wheeler
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
2,647
Points
113
Location
Elgin IL
This thing is smokin hot! If you couldn’t tell from my name, I’m a big 800b fan can’t wait to see more...
:2guns::2guns::2guns:
 

Pete n' Repete

Farmall Cub
Joined
Oct 1, 2020
Messages
18
Points
3
Thanks, I have spent many an hour just scrubbing but it brings back fond memories of field day in the barracks. On an unrelated note, I rewired and rebuilt Grandpa's old Kelvinator this weekend, it has been a partner for the Scout in the garage since my Grandfather purchased it. The fridge dates from 1946, which I assume he got to replace the ice box after coming home from WWII. It's amazing that the sealed system and compressor still work, all I did was rewire and replace bad insulation and switches, as well as the door seal, and she got to 32* in the main compartment in 3 hours. They sure don't build sh!t like they used to.
 

Attachments

  • DSC_0193.JPG
    DSC_0193.JPG
    245.9 KB · Views: 24
  • DSC_0194.JPG
    DSC_0194.JPG
    209.2 KB · Views: 20
  • DSC_0195.JPG
    DSC_0195.JPG
    201.6 KB · Views: 21

800bman

High Wheeler
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
2,647
Points
113
Location
Elgin IL
More pictures of that scout it’s so nice! That paint is great. And FYI grandpa didn’t cheap out, power brakes and power steering weren’t options, and a v8 with the borg Warner transmission was a top notch package that year. Pretty rad rig....
 
Top