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Belltown Build - 1974 Scout II

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Gioscout2

Farmall Cub
Joined
Dec 10, 2019
Messages
316
Points
63
Location
Essex
not a fan of Fords, but a fan of that young fellow,,he does amazing work, keep it up, and some big fab shop will scoop him up eventually.
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
Thanks for the kind words fellas. We've been working on the engine - who knew you needed 2 different 302s to make a good budget performance engine: you need the top of a 2000ish explorer and the bottom and internal of a 1990ish mustang GT. We got those. Heads are out to the machine shop and we are collecting parts to make 1 out of 2. Along with that we are working on chassis and front suspension design. Got our metal order figured out.

But more importantly - Stripes:

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Changes the whole look of the truck!

My buddy Rob used to do this for a living, but now just does it as a hobby. We traded the stickers and installation for a rocker replacement on his truck.

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Thanks for looking! Enjoy the fall. Bob & Finn
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
Hello fellows! I hope that you are all ready for the holidaze. Going to be weird times for us here - a lot of family time togetherness. But all good. We did have a little brush with the covid - my wife (a field engineer for the power company) came in contact with a contractor that tested positive. So, she got tested and we were isolating while awaiting her results. She was negative, and we were free again. But what a pain.

Finn finally got his driving permit - here in CT you get your permit at 16 and have to drive accompanied with a licensed adult for 6 months before you can sit for your license. I cycled him through all of the cars here in the first 2 days of legal driving and he did great. Not a whole not in the way of "instruction" necessary. He's taking it seriously and is at home behind the wheel. Didn't scare me even once. Mostly just pointing out how to keep a eye out for the crazy stuff other drivers will do. The GTI is the most fun to drive and the Scout is the coolest. The big 4X4 econoline van is a beast and mom's ridgeline is an appliance. According the boy.

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No a lot of time in the Scout before the weather shuts us down, but that's ok. It'll be there in the spring.

In other news, progress continues on that other project. He scrounged up a bunch of cool parts and built up a 1968/1991/1997 302. It's not aimed at being some crazy HP machine, just some decent reliable HP - built so that *perhaps* sometime in the future if the need arises some sort of forced induction could be installed. And made it purdy:

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He says the blue rockers are good for 20 hp. Anyway, I'm proud of the boy - took a lot of searching and researching and some dumb luck to find all of the parts and pieces he wanted.

We also have been working on chassis design, and that required figuring out suspension design first. Lots to learn there. We bought upper control arms, but built our own lower control arms. We were back on familiar ground mitering round tubes:

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We also picked up an older industrial sized TIG welder for a great deal. We went though that and everything looks good. Rebuilt the cooler, cleaned everything up. Now we have some more welding power:

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So, things are progressing along. Expecting to have good push forward this month, as our normal xmas/new years gathering at the family compound in the Adirondacks is unlikely to happen due to the covid. The silver lining there is we'll have 10 days off work and at home. And our steel for chassis get here this week.

Anyway, happy holidays to all of you! Here's to a better 2021! Bob & Finn
 

Kohler

Farmall Cub
Joined
Sep 21, 2018
Messages
361
Points
93
Location
Fredericton, NB
Your build came out excellent as expected. I took some time off the internet this summer and last I remember you were working on the hood, it's come a long way. Congrats to Finn on the license! Lucky boy to have all those vehicles at his fingertips. Looks like you'll have a sober driver when the borders open up and we can do that New England Scout II brewery tour....
 

mongocanfly

Y-Block King
Joined
Nov 5, 2017
Messages
3,462
Points
113
Location
Alabama
mom's ridgeline is an appliance......
Funny...hahahahahaha....
What's with all the holes in the intake?....
 

RinTX

Y-Block King
Joined
Jan 19, 2013
Messages
3,175
Points
113
Location
Ft Worth, TX
Man that blue on your Scout is an awesome color!
I too am curious about that intake?! A hole for each cylinder. What goes on top of that?
Congrats Finn!
 

MrKenmore

Dreams of Cub Cadets
Joined
May 19, 2013
Messages
4,919
Points
113
Location
Long Island, NY
Man that blue on your Scout is an awesome color!
I too am curious about that intake?! A hole for each cylinder. What goes on top of that?
Congrats Finn!
What you don't see is the top plenum. It's a funny looking design. That's the GT40 staggered hole design offered through by Ford Motorsports for the 86+ mustang. I think it was on regular production vehicles as well but that's where I know it from. The tubes go to a common plenum with a single air intake and the mass air flow sensor. FI is at the end of each intake runner. I always liked the 302. Nice engine. Very versatile.
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
Your build came out excellent as expected. I took some time off the internet this summer and last I remember you were working on the hood, it's come a long way. Congrats to Finn on the license! Lucky boy to have all those vehicles at his fingertips. Looks like you'll have a sober driver when the borders open up and we can do that New England Scout II brewery tour....
Scout brewery tour and a designated driver - that is good stuff!
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
What you don't see is the top plenum. It's a funny looking design. That's the GT40 staggered hole design offered through by Ford Motorsports for the 86+ mustang. I think it was on regular production vehicles as well but that's where I know it from. The tubes go to a common plenum with a single air intake and the mass air flow sensor. FI is at the end of each intake runner. I always liked the 302. Nice engine. Very versatile.
Matt is right - that is the GT40P lower intake. It was found on the lightning pickup, the mustang "cobra" and the mid-90s explorer of all things. The upper intake is that boxy bit that you see on top when looking at those injected 302s. You can spend a lot of money on fancier intake plenums but the gains are negligible - this particular combo of stock intakes is close to as good as it gets. We are still cleaning the upper portion up, and waiting on the throttle body to do some porting. We will drop the flow monitoring in favor of speed density - MAP and temp. Speed density easier to deal with with stand-alone ECU and also better for future forced induction.

Scout getting tucked away today. They sprayed the roads in anticipation of a snowstorm tomorrow.

Good day - B&F
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
Hello and Happy New Year folks. We are all good here. Staying home and such. As much as I like to go up to the Adirondacks to hang with the family over the holidays, this year we didn't. The benefit for me and Finn was a good block of time with not too many other obligations. plenty of garage time gave our project a boost. In the run up to the holidaze we revised our chassis design and gathered up our materials.
We wanted a table to build the chassis on - we knew that there would be a lot of welding and building on the floor would be tough on the knees and back. Not to mention running the TIG pedal from a kneeling position would be impossible. So, we made a 5'X10' torsion box with a MDF top.

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This worked really well. It is as flat as our basement floor - meaning it had a couple of humps. But we got those sanded out. A benefit to the MDF is that you can screw jig pieces to it. And pick it up and move it out of the way when you're done.

So, then we got to it. Finn TIG welded the entire thing. We used the new-to-us older Miller TIG. It's a powerful machine. It doesn't have the adjustability/control-ability of the smaller inverter TIG, but it has a ton of power and a water cooled torch so you can just keep at it. We built the chassis out of 120 wall 2X2 tubing. The hardest part was getting the Mustang IRS subframe in the correct place in the correct orientation. We love the metal chop saw. Just worlds better than the bandsaw or the angle grinder.

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Then it came off the table:
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We are very happy with the way it is coming out. After this, we moved the table out of the way, brought it back and flipped it over so the joints that could not be reached could be welded.
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And that's where we are. Hopefully we will get it down on the floor today. Then we put the cab on and start working on engine placement, etc.

So, more exciting stuff ahead! I hope you all have a happy, healthy and productive 2021. Cheers! Bob & Finn
 

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mongocanfly

Y-Block King
Joined
Nov 5, 2017
Messages
3,462
Points
113
Location
Alabama
I can see alot of welding took place there...I'm not doubting you have a plan, but I would be concerned about frame flex...or is a roll cage in the plan as well?...having built tube frames in my past..,it can be a real issue when to overcome when you add hp and traction..
 

Belltownbikes

Farmall Cub
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Points
63
So we've been plugging along on this other project, but came upon a process that worked well for us that you guys might be interested in. We made the headliner and other internal panels out of 1/8" PVC (HPDE) sheet. We bought the sheets from a buddy that works at a sign shop and it was cheap: $23/sheet. We liked the way it came out on the headliner so much that we decided to make the defroster ducts out of the same material and had good success.

So, the headliner. We made a template. Then you just warm this stuff with a heat gun and form it. once it cools, it holds the shape.

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Sometimes it is better to form in place, or add some extra tweaks:
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Then we used contact cement and covered it with headliner cloth and it we were very happy with the results. It not OE, and not restoration shop quality but really does look great and it was cheap:
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So then we tried our hand with the defroster ducts, and this is where you guys might be interested. This is what we had to duplpicate:
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So we made a mold, or maybe it's called a buck, IDK:
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Then we cut a piece of the pvc and just started at it with the heat gun, some clamps and a couple of pieces of wood to push and mold it around the buck. The hose connection was a old sauerkraut can Finn found in the pantry (took him a bit to get the smell out of that) .
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We made it in 2 halves, the first pushed around the buck and the second flatter - except where the intake is. The pieces can be joined with normal pvc cement.
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We added a top plate for the mounting holes, and so we can make a seal to the dash ducts - these will be better than stock. Then we covered them with some aluminum tape and sprayed the tops black:
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Nope - they are not show car quality, but they should work great and they were very easy to do. And, again - they were cheap. And available. We are planning on making the glove box out of the same stuff.

In other news, it has been snowing like crazy and the local bike club bought a snowdog, which is a trail grooming machine:
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You stand on a grooming sled and it makes a really nice track to ride your fat-tired bicycle on. The club had some issues with the original sled and wanted a new one. So, they had "Finn's Fabrications" make them a new one:
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Finn has also picked up some other work here and there and it is helping fund his project. More and more as word gets out. So, things are good here. The winter has been great, but looking forward to some warmer weather and getting the Scout out again. Good day folks! Thanks for looking - Bob & Finn
 

scout2000

Lives in an IH Dealership
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
5,466
Points
113
Location
DFW, TX
So we've been plugging along on this other project, but came upon a process that worked well for us that you guys might be interested in. We made the headliner and other internal panels out of 1/8" PVC (HPDE) sheet. We bought the sheets from a buddy that works at a sign shop and it was cheap: $23/sheet. We liked the way it came out on the headliner so much that we decided to make the defroster ducts out of the same material and had good success.

So, the headliner. We made a template. Then you just warm this stuff with a heat gun and form it. once it cools, it holds the shape.

View attachment 204194


referencing the BP forum archives, there have been others here who have successfully used sign material for headliner (re)construction.

I'm mostly curious how this material will hold up? Is it still in the same/similar shape 5 years down the road? Being used for headliner material, the assumption is no direct UV exposure, so I think that mostly I'm wondering about age, then also the standard repeated hot and cold cycles from weather, etc, that the rest of the vehicle is exposed to.
 
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