Truck has trouble starting after driving for a while.

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by TheCrazyFarmer, Jun 19, 2019.


  1. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Farmall Cub

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    I having this issue where my truck takes a long time to start after its been driving for a while.
    It will start up just fine to start with, but after its been driving it takes a lot of cranking to get it to start again. By the time I finally get it to start, my battery is dead from all the cranking.

    Any thoughts?:cowboy:
     
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  2. bboud

    bboud Farmall Cub

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    Mine seems to vaporize all the fuel out of the carburator bowls after shut down for 10 or 15 minutes if the engine is fully heated. I put a phenonic spacer under the carb and it didnt seem to help. But I d have to turn the engine over a good bit to get fuel back to the carb but not so much the battery dies out. I'm thinking about switching to fuel injection personally.
     
  3. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 High Wheeler

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    What truck and engine do you have?
     
  4. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Farmall Cub

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    1968 International long bed 2WD 1100C V8 304.
     
  5. BarneyG

    BarneyG Farmall Cub

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    Does it smell like gas minutes after turning off? You may be getting carb boil.
    Get it good and hot, park it and wait a minute. Then pop the air filter off and look into the carb barrels. You may see gas in the bottom literally boiling from the engine heat transferring upwards (as heat does). Basically it boils the fuel from the line and bowl(s) into carb. Has to go somewhere once it starts vaporizing. Multiple causes but all lead to the same thing.
    The hard start could be from the hot fuel puddle in the carb, basically flooded and little fuel in the line and bowl(s). You could open throttle to dump gas downward, then crank. Not ideal, but won't kill you if done occasionally.
    I suffer from it on hot summer days myself. Does help if after a hot drive I let her idle a bit so the fan cools her off some. Shade helps too.
     
  6. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 High Wheeler

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    Good, so it should have a Holley, 2 barrel carb.
    Can you remove the air cleaner housing and provide the info that is on the front of the airhorn?
    Then take a photo of the carb and intake manifold from the front?
     
  7. Bill Bennett

    Bill Bennett High Wheeler

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    How thick is the phenolic spacer under the carb? Is the spacer 'full width' under the fuel bowl? Is the fuel line from the pump metal or rubber? Are you running the original 'oil bath' filter or the aftermarket 'paper' filter? Have you checked the fuel level in the fuel bowl?
     
  8. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Farmall Cub

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    Sorry, I'm new to this. Would you mind dumbing that down for me?:cowboy: What am I looking for?
     
  9. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 High Wheeler

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    Numbers on the carb.
     
  10. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Farmall Cub

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    What numbers am I looking for? Do you need the model number, or another number?
     
  11. Mark Aycock

    Mark Aycock High Wheeler

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    Yes. Hamilton Fuel Injection will cure this.
     
  12. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 High Wheeler

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    Any and all numbers.
     
  13. TorqueMonster1

    TorqueMonster1 Farmall Cub

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    And post pictures if you can. Many times guys on this forum “see” something that’s not right or something that could be done differently. Without the pictures it might not ever be discovered. Mark
     
  14. Patrick Morris

    Patrick Morris Lives in an IH Dealership

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    No doubt. It's a bit drastic though for a guy who just wants his problem solved so that his truck runs the way they're all supposed to with a carb.

    A less drastic approach would be to add in an electric fuel pump. Something you can flick on at the dash before start up just to ensure there's a proper amount of gas in the lines and float bowl. Of course we are all just speculating until we see the pics of his setup.
     
  15. scoutboy74

    scoutboy74 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    First thought...I hope you're not starter cranking for longer than about 15 seconds at a time with a rest between tries, otherwise that starter motor won't be around much longer. Second thought, I wonder if your battery is up to the task. Perhaps it is too small, or has grown weak from age and/or a lack of maintenance. Third thought, heat insulation. Your carb needs a base gasket with a fuel bowl shield to insulate the bottom of the fuel bowl from engine heat. Your metal fuel line between the fuel pump and the carb should also be insulated from engine heat. There is a product called Heat Shield that you can purchase online. It is tubular fabric that can be ordered in assorted diameters. Order the size best suited for your fuel line, cut a piece off the roll to length, disconnect one end of your fuel line and slip the piece over the line. Today's ethanol laced fuels only makes this vapor lock problem worse for any engine with a mechanical fuel pump and a carb on it. Carb fuel systems rely on low fuel pressure, roughly 6 psi. This is nowhere near enough to overcome the effects of fuel that has changed from a liquid to a vapor form. That's why fuel injected fuel systems don't suffer from this issue. They run on a much higher fuel pressure, plus there is always an electric fuel pump in place. But, if you take some steps to adequately insulate your fuel plumbing from engine heat, you can tame the effects of vapor lock.
     
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  16. mallen

    mallen High Wheeler

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    Additionally, they have moved the fuel pump to the gas tank. The issue is, when you draw liquid through a line, its under vacuum that makes it even MORE likely to boil. The solution ,as was done in in modern vehicles is to put the fuel pump in the tank so it pushes it through the line instead of pulling it. It can STILL boil in a metal line though, which can cause it to force its way past the needle valve and spill over into the intake, causing a hot start issue.

    A big problem with older vehicles is all the changes that are made over the years. A different carb, a different fuel line, a change in how the fuel line was routed, ethanol in the gasoline. They can all add up to a situation where it just wont work anymore. In fact, one thing people often do when it does not work is change even MORE things, with even MORE unintended consequences. I recommend being very careful and thinking through any changes. Avoid "band-aids". For example, the mechanical fuel pump worked fine back in the day. So why is it not working fine now? (or is it really ok, and the problem lies else where) What does an electric pump bring to the table that the mechanical one does not. If you cant answer that question, then your fixing your truck with "magic". That is, you go through the motions, swap parts out and if it works, you really dont have any solid idea why. The problem with fixing it like that is, often, you had a subtle problem, caused by subtle changes. Another subtle change and the problem comes back.

    Sometimes it makes sense to change things around, but it should never be done without careful though. A good way to diagnost these things is by looking at what changed versus the factory setup. Thats usually where the problem lies, in some subtle issue introduced when things were swapped around. It may not be practical to put it back like it was, but at least you know what went wrong.
     
  17. TorqueMonster1

    TorqueMonster1 Farmall Cub

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    Excellent reply mallen!! This same thought process comes to mind when someones Scout is running hot. The day it left the dealership it didn’t have an overheating issue. AND also wiring issues.

    I’m going to have a good look at my Scout and compare it’s present condition to how it was on day one. Hopefully that’ll shed some light on some things. Mark
     
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  18. Patrick Morris

    Patrick Morris Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Well like I said, it's all speculating and conjecture until we see those pics and learn more. Until then it's all blah blah blah from us guys. 350 words worth just above.
     
  19. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Farmall Cub

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    Ok, I took some pictures of the numbers on the carb, I don't know what numbers are important.

    I have no steel lines, they are all rubber fuel hose. I have a clear glass fuel filter between the pump and the carb, and when I turn the key I can see it fill with fuel.

    Here are the pictures.

    DSC00123.JPG


    DSC00125.JPG


    DSC00126.JPG

    If there is anything in specific that you want me to take a photo of, let me know.
     
  20. scoutboy74

    scoutboy74 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    List 6379. According to my information, which could be suspect, the first time that list number appeared was on 1970 304 engines backed by an automatic transmission. That isn't your truck, but it's not uncommon for carbs from other vehicles to appear on something else.
     
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