TF 727 to Dana tail section

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by Tom Rassier, Jun 29, 2020.


  1. Tom Rassier

    Tom Rassier Farmall Cub

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    I recently began working on another project. I sourced a TF 727 transmission but something appears off a bit. When I got the transmission it did not have a bull gear attached. It looks like where the shaft exits the housing (on the bull gear side) is set up for a slip yoke... My bull gear will go on, but there is nothing behind the bull gear. Shouldn't there be a thrust bearing or something? Also, there is a gap between the output shaft and the oil seal that is installed. That is why I think it may have had a slip yoke. The guy I got it from told me it was from a running driving vehicle, but he was not sure if it came from a Scout or a Land Rover. He assured me they used the same bell housing, and from what I have read, I think he is correct as Land Rover used an adapter plate to install IH transmission for several years. I don't know if the tail is the same. Maybe I am just missing a bushing or something? Can anyone give me some insight.

    I have been trying to find an exploded view of the IH transmission to Dana adapter but so far I have not been able to find one to see if I have all the parts I need.
     
  2. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Best thing to do is post a picture of what you have here,its real easy,take picture,click on upload a file in the lower right corner.I have never heard of a land rover using a 727,could be a dodge one or amc.
     
  3. Tom Rassier

    Tom Rassier Farmall Cub

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    Jeff, Land Rover used a TF 727 that is almost identical to the Scout 727 with the use of an adapter plate to bolt to the Rover V8 in the 80's. They purchased all of the units IH had on hand when IH stopped building the Scout.
    Here are a bunch of photos for you. You will see the large space between the output shaft and the seal. Also, there is only one seal; not two seals installed face to face.

    I also included a photo of the bell housing. Notice the additional tube from the pump vent to the top of the bell... That is a remote vent that Range Rover added so the transmission would not pull water in if you drove in too deep.
    output shaft.jpg output shaft 2.jpg output shaft 3.jpg bull gear 3.jpg bull gear 2.jpg bull gear 1.jpg Bell housing.jpg
     
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  4. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    looks like it came out of a 2 wheel drive scout,they just had a yoke bolted on there,would make sence for the bigger seal,something looks different,but I cant find a picture right now.
     
  5. scoutboy74

    scoutboy74 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Very interesting. I didn't know that historical tidbit. What did those Rovers use for a transfer case? Was it a married or a divorced unit? The Scout II 4x2 models used the same tail housing assembly as the units installed in the full size Pickalls.
     
  6. Tom Rassier

    Tom Rassier Farmall Cub

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    I
    I don’t know... from what I understand, the 83 and 84 Rovers ( the years using IH transmissions) are somewhat rare in the US market because Land Rover didn’t begin selling Range Rovers to the US market until 1987. I don't know a lot about those vehicles but I guess a number of them found there way to the US via aftermarket sales.
     
  7. scoutboy74

    scoutboy74 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    According to Wikipedia...The Range Rover used permanent four-wheel drive, rather than the switchable rear-wheel/four-wheel drive on Land Rover Series vehicles, and had a lever for switching ratios on the transfer box for off-road use. Originally, the only gearbox available was a four-speed manual unit, until Fairey overdrive became an option after 1977. A three-speed Chrysler TorqueFlite automatic gearbox became an option in October 1982, after years of demands from buyers.[10] This was upgraded to a 4-speed ZF box in 1985, coupled to an LT230 transfer box.[13]
    So from this I glean a couple things. One, that unit was likely out of a Range Rover Classic and not a Land Rover, as I see no mention of a 3 speed automatic transmission option listed for the Land Rover. Two, with full time 4x4, there obviously would be no transfer case. The output of the transmission had to be coupled to the axles in some manner, though.

    EDIT...I should have read closer. There actually was a two speed transfer case with the full time system. OK. The question still remains of whether it was a divorced or married setup when combined with the TF 727.
     
  8. Tom Rassier

    Tom Rassier Farmall Cub

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    Interesting little rabbit hole this has taken us down... LOL.. I am going to guess it was a married transfer case, because if you look closely at the housing you can see the remains / outline of a gasket, and on the other side what appear to be clean spots where a bolt head once lived.

    One other thing I just learned about this transmission. The date code is 8098. According to the Chrysler 10,000 day calendar, this transmission was built on September 29, 1983. I also noticed the tail housing does not have a weep hole drilled through it to equalize the pressure between the inner and outer oil seal.

    I have located a Scout tail housing, and it is being shipped to me. I don't want to risk complications from some unknown difference between this 1983 adapter and the one IH built for the Scout. After I get the other tail housing, I will compare everything and see just what the difference, if any, really is.

    scout tail.jpg



    scout tail 2.jpg
     
  9. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    No they didn't,I have had 2 and they both look just like the tranny without the Tcase attached.
     
  10. Jeff Ismail

    Jeff Ismail High Wheeler

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    Looks like you are missing the spacer that goes between the bull gear and output bearing.
     
  11. scoutboy74

    scoutboy74 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Well shizz. Not the first time ol' Papa Mayben has lead me astray. Looking through the parts manuals, the illustrations are all the same for
    the tail housings regardless of equipment package and vehicle platform, which was obviously an oversight. The married adapter housing is not pictured as far as I can see. The part numbers are different of course, but only by a numeral or two.
     
  12. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    When we first bought my daughters 73 and I looked under,I was what the F did some one do,then I found out they where all like that.
     

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