Starting trouble after sitting for a while

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by Hutch, Sep 5, 2009.


  1. Hutch

    Hutch Farmall Cub

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    It's been a while since I have been on here, but I figure this as good a place to start as any. My scout sat through the summer in the heat of Tucson. The battery died, and I have replaced it. I can get it to start right up with starter fluid and it will idle. But I can't get it start without the starter fluid. I think all the fuel evaporated out of the tank, so I have put 5 gallons of fresh fuel in the tank. The fuel filter is full of fuel, maybe even more than usual. I think the carb base gasket may have shrunk because the idle increases when I spray starter fluid around the base of the carb. I'll be checking the torque on the carb bolts asap, just wondering if anyone has any other ideas on things to look at. '77 Scout II 2210 carb.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Erik VanRenselaar

    Erik VanRenselaar Y-Block King

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    The highly-volatile starting fluid may be giving a false reading, as it can be vaporized readily and drawn in through the normal air intake path.
    I prefer to use Berryman B-12 Chemtool spray to locate vacuum leaks. Propane can be used, too. But I find the Chemtool spray to be the most convenient.

    If your base gasket is of the thick style with metal inserts around the stud holes, it may be that the inserts are too thick. On my current base gasket, I had to remove the inserts and file them down in order to obtain a better gasket *squish*.

    The pump plunger rubber in the accelerator pump may also be dried up and ineffective.

    Is the winter fuel in Tucson heavily laden with ethanol, like Las Vegas' is?
     
  3. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

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    When carburetors sit empty for a while, particularly in a very dry, hot climate, the gaskets sometimes can dry out and shrink, causing leaks. If the leak is in the 'right' area, you might not be getting fuel delivered to the bowl by the accelerator pump, which normally 'primes' the engine. This should be easy to check; watch and see if fuel is squirting out of the jet when the linkage is moved (throttle opened).
     
  4. Hutch

    Hutch Farmall Cub

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    Thanks guys,
    I will take a closer look at things tomorrow using your advice.
     

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