Saving a tired old M5H6...

Discussion in 'IHC Military Vehicles' started by Kruser Keller, Aug 13, 2020.


  1. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Next step: tackling my old nemesis, the oil filter. My truck has a RD450 with a sock type filter instead of the typical military senior type found on the 361 engines. I don't know where the original went, and I'm very curious to hear if anyone else runs a sock on theirs. The truck "as found" had a base with a bad relief spring, so I set it aside. In a pile of parts that went with my truck I found a filthy DeLuxe sock filter housing pulled off another engine at some point. I cleaned it up and painted it quick years ago to get it going, but now have some time to make it right. It says "DeLuxe Products Corp, La Porte, Ind." on it as well as "Use CU Cartridge". (Crosses to a NAPA 1002.) Here it is mounted loosely on the truck:
    20201108_163718.jpg
    The main problem here is opposite the old filter, here the relief plunger is stuck. Also, the plunger and spring are in a blind hole, no way to get it out. I had to soak, heat, and eventually drill through the old plunger and remove with an easy-out. What I found was not nice. The spring was rusted and shattered, and the plunger pitted beyond repair.
    The porting on the filter base:
    20201117_212736.jpg
    The plunger is 3/4" diameter with about a 9/16" bore. It was lunched. So, I made a new one, visible to the left. The original spring was probably 2.5" long, so I found a close substitute at my local hardware store. Hopefully it's close enough, the oil pressure will tell.
    Everything has been cleaned and is being painted now. Next update will contain final assembly.
     
  2. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Got all the pieces cleaned and painted:
    IMG_1594.jpg
    Putting it together was fairly straightforward with a new base gasket. Oil enters through an orifice in the bottom of the canister, passes through the filter sock, and exits through a hole in the tube at the top of the filter. Here you can see how the sock sits in the canister:
    IMG_1595.jpg
    And complete:
    IMG_1596.jpg
    IMG_1597.jpg
    This style of filter doesn't hava a sump drain, instead it has a removable bowl in the bottom that catches sludge by gravity. It is called the "DeLuxe Sedi-Sump".
    All back together, another part done!
     
  3. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Next project up, my transfer case shift levers. I had painted them years ago but the pivots were so worn out that they had a couple inches of side to side play at the top. Also, some fool had cut the ball knobs off for some unknown ill-conceived reason. Savage!
    IMG_1542.jpg
    The first step was to remove the pivot shaft from the casting, as it was badly worn and pitted. Initially, I tried my 20 ton press, but to no avail. I was afraid I would crack the irreplaceable casting. So I cut away the shaft a little bit at a time:
    IMG_1543.jpg
    And drilled:
    IMG_1544.jpg
    This piece was VERY difficult to remove; I had to drill it out to 7/8" and cut our the slug with a sawzall. Be aware if you attempt this yourself!
    Next I machined a new shaft. The old one was 1-1/16" outside diameter. I started with a piece of stock that size and machined the exposed end down to 1" (actually 0.995") to accept the new bushings. I then drilled a 3/16" cotter pin hole:
    IMG_1576.jpg
    IMG_1589.jpg
    And pressed it together:
    IMG_1591.jpg
    Moving on to the levers, I set them up in my vertical mill and bored the egged out openings to 1-1/8":
    IMG_1557.jpg
    Then I was able to press in new Oilite bushings with a vise. The bushings were left over from a South Bend lathe rebuild project and were the perfect size. I drilled grease holes in the bushings and installed new grease fittings.
    IMG_1558.jpg
    IMG_1559.jpg
    Finally the bushings were reamed to 1" to slide nicely onto the new shaft. Next time, final assembly.
     
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  4. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    More nice work. Keep it up.
    And I really like the old Atlas lathe. My dad had one like that I learned on. Mine is a Craftsman and a little newer with a quick change but basically the same thing.
     
  5. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Thanks. My atlas is a 1945 model that I completely disassembled and restored. It even has the original atlas motor. I also have 9 inch and 10 inch south bend lathes, both with threading gearboxes and QC toolposts. Better machines than the atlas but it's too much fun to run to give up! A lathe is pretty much a necessity when working on these trucks.
     
  6. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Here is the finished product:
    20201121_203413.jpg
    I modified a thick washer on the lathe by boring out to 1 inch to replace the old one, then greased everything and fastened together with a new cotter pin. If anyone has a measurement of the diameter of their ball knobs I'd love to know. Then I can get replacements and weld them on. This is good enough for now, and 1000 times better than how they were. No more slop!
     
  7. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    The knobs are somewhat rough cast but mine measure about 1.22 inches. So a 1.25 round ball would be very close in size.
     
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  8. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    Thanks George!
     
  9. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    I think I'd be tempted to drill and tap both the shafts and the new balls to 5/16 or 3/8 if you have the room and thread it all together. If it looks right, then take it back apart and put locktight on everything, and tighten it all up one last time. You could always heat it if you needed to take it apart for some reason.
    That way you dont have any welds to do or to grind down or smooth out.
    But either way will probably work just fine.
     
  10. Kruser Keller

    Kruser Keller Farmall Cub

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    I thought about that method too, probably going to go that way. Maybe with a little JB weld to smooth out the seam.
     
  11. Barry Ring

    Barry Ring Farmall Cub

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    What a great story and a great truck I’m looking forward to seeing the progress.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

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