Recruiting younger enthusiasts.

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by Challengeexcepted, May 23, 2020 at 7:39 PM.


  1. Challengeexcepted

    Challengeexcepted Farmall Cub

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    This may be sort of like trying to be answer the age old “what is the meaning of life?” but it’s something I wanted to put to the good folks here. So here’s my question: “ Who do you see owning iHs in the next 20ish years and how are they going to be introduced to them” this question really came to my mind recently as I’m the only one of my group of friends to own a IH of any kind. We have a joke that the only people that are into binders are either old enough have fought in the American Civil War, or are hipsters with tech jobs who couldn’t fix a ham sandwich and are driving Scouts because early Broncos aren’t obscured enough lol. ( no disrespect to any vets here. Seriously) To give some backstory, i’m in my early to mid 20s and I’ve always been around and worked on cars trucks and heavy equipment. It’s not what I do for a living, but I love wrenching on just about everything. I had always known Scouts/ international’s existed, but only really got bitten by the bug when my dad gave me his 73 Scout ii that had been sitting in a field behind our house for about 20 years. It’s currently halfway restored and is slowly becoming my daily driver as I bring it back to its former glory. I love it’s quirks, simple agricultural approach to functionality and the fact that’s not part of the big three.
     
  2. theloneduck

    theloneduck Farmall Cub

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    I think this is key, along with availability of the scouts.
     
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  3. Michael1971

    Michael1971 Farmall Cub

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    I was looking for a new car because my 09 diesel Silverado was getting poor fuel economy. I was looking for either a convertible car or a small pickup, or I would joke and say a convertible pickup thinking no such thing existed. I drove by a classic car lot seeing what would become my scout 2 cabtop. My parents were so against the idea of a old car. I got the truck I wanted, and the convertible, but not so much of the better fuel economy lol.
     
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  4. Challengeexcepted

    Challengeexcepted Farmall Cub

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    Good point. You can’t own something that doesn’t exist haha. Here in the PNW vehicles don’t seem to rust hardly at all and scouts and Pickups are fairly plentiful on Craigslist and market place. It’s pretty cool to pass one of the other 4 or 5 scouts in town, wave to driver and think “that guy (sometimes girl) gets it!”
     
  5. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Pass it on.all you can. Im doing it to who listens.. My 33 year old son for 1. And 12 year old grandson. And 58 year old brother. LoL. Its fun.
     
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  6. Challengeexcepted

    Challengeexcepted Farmall Cub

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    Another thing I should mention is that it seems that the stereotype of younger people is that they either are mechanically incompetent or are only into high revving small turbo charged cars. While there is some truth to that, it really depends on the location. I live in a fairly small town but my friend group is fairly varied. Most of us work skilled blue-collar jobs in diesel tech, Logging/equipment operation, utilities, Machine shops and construction. Just about everybody wants to build their rides themselves and on a budget by sharing skills, equipment and acquiring parts online, through junkyards or bartering between ourselves ( for instance I am the ring and pinion/gear set up guy who also does metal fab) brand loyalty is extremely diverse as well with jeeps Toyotas full-size bronco’s and all the import brands like Suzuki’s and Mitsubishi’s. As long as your parents didn’t pay for it everybody loves it. Street cars or 4x4s if you build it it’s cool.
     
  7. winchested

    winchested Y-Block King

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    Like other fellas. I wanted a convertible 4x4 to build and take my kids wheeling. I found the Scout SSII in Google pictures. Had never seen one in life ever... The rest is history.

    I bought sight unseen online at 30 years old and by 33 I finally had the 4x4 I wanted. Well it's a continual work in progress!
     
  8. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer Binder Driver

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    I'm 17, and I love all things IH! I bought my first vehicle about 2 years ago, and its a 1968 1100C. I always knew my first vehicle would be an old truck, and I was leaning towards a late 60s early 70s ford pickup, but the moment I saw an old IH I had to have one!

    I don't fall under the hipster category, and I'm definitely not the hot-rod type either. I guess I"m more of the ( I enjoy the heck outta myself, holding everybody up, haulin stuff in my old beater farm truck, goin 40 MPH down the highway ) type!

    I didn't know anything about mechanics when I bought my truck, and my parents don't know anything about mechanics, so its all thanks to you guys!

    I'm pretty disappointed in a lot of the people my age that I see around here, but I think there's still some young people out there that have the same kind of interests.

    I think there are probably more young people doing this stuff if you go to smaller towns, or in more rural areas.
     
  9. Gunfighter97

    Gunfighter97 Binder Driver

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    Im 23, I didn't find IH so much as IH found me. I've always loved fixing stuff (im a gunsmith now by trade), my dad and i had (still have) a 46 dodge pickup we will someday restore. Bogging down in that project made me conclude I needed something that was still semi operational to learn more about repair work on. A couple free old cars and lessons learned later, I wanted something to USE, that I could depend on if the world ever went to $#!÷ and not rely on computers. My criteria was pre smog, 4x4, manual, and a swb pickup. About a year later and a dozen or so rust buckets looked at, my 65 1100 landed in my lap.
    I'm kinda a cultural reject tbh, my buddies say I'm like the old guy in the room XD (NOT A HIPSTER) I'm not tech savvy in the slightest, spent most of my time growing up hunting or doing other outdoor stuff in a program very close to boy scouts. The biggest thing I see about my truck that appeals to, and will moreso over time to people my age is self reliance. I love the fact that I know this truck inside and out, and can maintain and repair it myself. By the time I'm done with it I'll have a brand new vehicle for the price some leases, that will last another fifty years. Not to mention it drives over stuff (I expect it would zombies as well) almost as well as a horse, and the winch and a good bed rack make it the swiss army knife of offroaders. At least for my purposes. The things that make IH stand out to me is (in my 1100's case) how massively overbuilt they are in relation to other trucks of the period.

    Sent from my LG-LS993 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Challengeexcepted

    Challengeexcepted Farmall Cub

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    Rock on man! Same here! I’m not tech savvy at all. I understand mechanical stuff, and I can build complex circuits, but software confuses me. I’m trying to learn tho. My dads ford 5.0 swapped Volvo has a stand alone after market ECU and won’t run without a tune. I’m going to teach myself how to use tuner studio if it kills me!
     
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  11. Gunfighter97

    Gunfighter97 Binder Driver

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    Lol my level of electrical tech experience (since I've never had a fully working electrical system before) was taking a broken signal light off my broken down sand rail, and wiring it to an old AA battery tray to make the light come on when circuit was closed. I then recruited my neighbor's (cattle rancher's) 10 year old son to help me rewire my 1100. We used a piece of old speaker wire and my signal light contraption to reveal how POed the wiring was, and salvaged two sections of the original harness to save some $$$, then put in a repro harness. Then we spent the next two weeks figuring out how a signal switch from a 72 1210 works and how to adapt it to my 1100. . . with a wiring diagram, and a home made continuity tester. . . neither of us will ever be the same. Its safe to say there is blood, sweat, tears, money, and sanity in this truck, that I'll just never get back. And I'm ok with that XD[​IMG]

    Sent from my LG-LS993 using Tapatalk
     
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  12. Bill Bennett

    Bill Bennett High Wheeler

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    What is that steering wheel from? Is it mounted on the original steering shaft?
     
  13. Gunfighter97

    Gunfighter97 Binder Driver

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    80s ish Mercedes unimog. Its held on to a chewed up aluminum hub with two different socket head bolts. Don't ask lol.[​IMG]

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  14. TravelerMan79

    TravelerMan79 Farmall Cub

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    I've known about Scout IIs' probably since my teens (now mid 50s). Was never really drawn to them quite frankly. I had two Early Ford Broncos (73/74) about 15 yrs ago. Bought them because I wanted something with a removable top. Was even looking at Jeepsters at the time. Came across an early Scout 80/800 locally around the same time I had my Broncos. Didn't really care much for the looks at the time.
    Fast forward, and once again I found myself looking for an early 4x4 with a removable top. We'll wouldn't luck have it that I came across a kijij ad (think Craig's List) for a 79 Traveler. What is a Traveler I asked myself? Started doing a bit of digging, and discovered that International had a whole range of vehicles including pickups which I don't think I really clued in on. What is a Travelall? What is a Travelette? What is a WagonMaster? My God, I was in love with these things. Even the looks of the Scout 80/800 had grown on me. Well, I had to go see this Traveler thing. Now it is mine. My two daughters (18 yrs/16 yrs) think it is really cool. Even my older daughter's boyfriend thinks it is cool.
    Yes, most kids today aren't as technically inclined in the same numbers "our" generation was. That is not going to change. The good news is that there are still some out there, (as you can see here) that are interested in old tech stuff. It is up to us to pass the torch on in any way we can.
    It is interesting as this topic is often brought up on the H.A.M.B forum where I'm a member as well. Most members are older than I, and too often I believe, lament about the good ole days and that the younger generations are just not so much interested in "classic" cars any longer (in their case pre 65 only).
     
  15. RinTX

    RinTX High Wheeler

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    I’m pretty sure when I die my son is gonna be saying - what in the hell do I do with all this crap...
    He is not completely mechanically incompetent - he’s mostly just not interested.
     
  16. RDC279

    RDC279 Farmall Cub

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    I thought every one had an IH. There will always be people that love IH. People always try an label a generation as all being one way that is way off base. Now I try and do my part any kids that comes over to the house get a chance to drive an old red tractor, One of my favorite things I got to do when I was a kid. My uncle got me started many years ago.
     
  17. wjajr

    wjajr Binder Driver

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    A walk on the dark side will reveal Dodge Dakota was based on 1976 IH Scout II Terra, and in 1989-1991 Dodge made a fully retractable convertible top version of it. Scroll down a wee bit.

    When those trucks came out I considered getting one to park along side of my 82 LeBaron Convertible, but the rescission of 88-89 put a damper on my self employed disposable income then. I did however believe that if one were to equip that truck with a snowplow, and festoon a Domino's Pizza delivery sign atop it would be the most useless and dangerous vehicle on the road. For you living in non- snow country, most trucks equipped with plows are driven by maniacs, and need I say more about pizza delivery drivers.

    And, someone above was right on, IH trucks just come to you. Mine was dumped in my lap by my brother-in-law along with an old tractor, both relics of his late fathers estate, his excuse was he wanted it to go to a good home. I for one like old stuff, even married to an old woman now for 43 years. Old stuff is good stuff.
     
  18. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Takes time
     
  19. NorOntSCout

    NorOntSCout Farmall Cub

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    I remember I was 19 when I saw my first Scout, an 800. 1 year later I bought it. I'm in my mid 40's now trying to get my kids interested.

    Might help if I got one or more of them in driving condition before either one turns 16.

    My collection is still holding at 3 Traveler's and that original '66 that started it.

    NorOntScout

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  20. 68Tall1200

    68Tall1200 Farmall Cub

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    I grew up in the Western suburbs of Chicago, and my Dad grew up in the city. He was always into old cars, yet never had one of his own after college. He got me a rust bucket Scout II for $500 when I was 15. He told me that he was always curious about them because they came from a company that built big trucks and AG equipment.

    Many years later I have taken it many steps further, as I am wrenching on my ‘68 Travelall and ‘66 Travelette. I found a ‘63 Travelall for my oldest (now 16) daughter we are bringing it back to life. There has been some extensive metal repair, but I want to do it right so it lasts her lifetime with proper care. She tells me that it never occurred to her NOT to have an IH of her own. I call that a parenting success!

    I found a nice ‘64 Scout 80 for my youngest (13 years), and we have been working on cleaning up and regasketing the drivetrain. It barely needs any bodywork.

    I made a rule with the kids that these vehicles and their restoration only moves forward with them helping to get it done, or at least learn about what is involved and why. The quality time spent together has more value than any IH I can think of.

    Because my Travelall is on the road regularly, a lot of people stop me and ask questions. Several have bought an IH of their own! I think the key is to get these cool old rigs out for people to see. The Travelall I have now was a dream vehicle for me when I first saw a photo of one at the 3rd Scout NATS when I was only a teenager.
     

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