Question for those who tow with thier IH...

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by BigRigg, Nov 26, 2018.


  1. BigRigg

    BigRigg Y-Block King

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    My 1972 1210 will be our all around farm truck. I will load bales of hay, and it's what I will use to tow junk home with. It currently has a built IC 392, t19, 3.73 gears and 33 inch tires. Brakes will be disc front, and hydroboost.

    Freeway driving will happen, but not all day, every day.

    I also have a front Dana 44 and 14 bolt with 4.09 gears.
    I also have a front Dana 70, and ra15 with 4.88 gears. It's a dually rear end.

    The 392 and 4.88s will pull whatever I want, but slowly. Especially if I run a 33ish tire.

    The 409 gears seem to be the happy medium, but it's not a dually rear.

    My question is this; for what I'm using this for, do I really need a dually rear? Will the 14 bolt and load e tires be good enough to haul with? The heaviest thing I can imagine hauling, is a 20 ft trailer with a d series on the back. Or something similar. A scout, a kb, a m series tractor...

    Wheel base will be a factor, this used to be a short bed truck. I'd also like to run a 33 or 35 inch tire.

    Thoughts, and other opinions welcome. What say you?
     
  2. stroker3

    stroker3 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    As far as towing goes, load range E with SRW should be fine. Keep them at 80psi when hauling anything on the heavy side. Wouldn't go dually unless you really want them or start getting into the 14k+ towing range and need them.
    Guess the short wheelbase is something in the 119'' range, not as nice as something longer. Just use a good trailer brakes/controller and simply drive it knowing there's some weight behind you.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  3. Kenneth Barber

    Kenneth Barber Farmall Cub

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    As a kid, we use to stack 3 bales higher than the top cab on a one ton duelly 72 ford with overload springs and it still sagged pretty bad.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  4. Mustang

    Mustang Farmall Cub

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    14 bolt with singles should do fine for you. Air bags work wonders if sqauting is an issue. That said I love being able to haul two round bales on the back of my dually!- But it sure gets stuck easier than my old 3/4 ton!
     
  5. BO185

    BO185 Y-Block King

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    Biggest issues is hills were you live. I have 4.56 gears with 35's and my 392 with T34 tows great and can run 75 easy unloaded but the OD helps alot. But the 3-4 split sucks on hills.

    The Dana 70 front should be drums and closed knuckle??

    I would run a the 44 front if its disc's at least and make sure trailer brakes are good. Run the 44 and keep eye out for a GM dana 60 as the brake size alone is worth the swap (a 4.10 front will work just as well too). The 14 bolt will work fine but have to watch your rear axle weight as to not over load it typically 7-8k on the rear axle. But typical you will over load the tires before this as most E's in single will be 3k# or so in weight more for duals.


    Weigh truck empty then loaded to check this.

    All that said the 4.88 will tow better power wise with a 33 or even 35. Biggest issue IMO is the short bed. I would want a goose for it for sure would pull it better vs a bumper pull. If bumper pull then a weight distribution hitch with sway control will help alot for the short WB.


    With the 4.09 you'll run 2915 rpm at 70. And with 4.88 will be 3478 rpm not screaming but I would keep it around 65 with a load to be safe. 4.88 at 65 with 33 is only 3230 rpm.

    Biggest issue with air bags is over loading the rear axle weight rating, really easily as it does nothing to help with the weight load on level the truck and can make it worse weight on axle wise. A weight distribution hitch will put more weight on the front axle moving weight from rear axle to the front. Also a gooseneck will help with this as well.

    Only bad thing is your door tag weight, the GVRW, will be low on the 3/4 ton. Technically if your over GVRW and get in a wreck overload your insurance or even the other person that hits you insurance could bitch even try not to cover it. Yeah it may not happen but you could be on the hook for it. If you could use the 1500/500 tag that would have a 14k GVWR easily.

    Man I came by your area couple weeks ago delivering some stuff I should have stopped by!! lol
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2018
  6. kdsmit

    kdsmit Binder Driver

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    I haul a pretty good load with my 1974, D200 with the 4.10 gears and stock tires. Once rolling an road speeds it handle hills pretty good. I usually go around 55 mph, depends on the load and the road. Stopping is always a consideration. I have a 24 foot gooseneck and haul up to 14 round bales (4x5's, @ +/- 800 lbs). 55mph is not a problem on nice roads (two lane highways). 40 to 45 mph on dippy, divvy, curvy back roads. I am guessing a little on this as my speedo is a little off. I could be going a little slower.
     
  7. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    73 travelette 1210 (sold a year ago) I towed a 29 foot camper 5000 pounds empty with no problems,droped to 45 in mountains.392 /727 with 373 gears
     
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  8. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

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    74 HD 200 392 4 speed 373s. 33 x 12.5 x 16.5 . Wish I had a gooseneck and will someday as the plate is there on the truck, currently tow everything from flat fender Willys to 2 5/8 2 axle trailer (loaded with equipment, trucks (Terra, Travelall, pickups etc) ) . Non dually truck.

    I have never had an issue towing, as someone stated above, stopping is the factor. I don't like to run over 60 towing even though I probably could. Just plan my stops like any other large commercial vehicle that I drive from time to time. It can run a bit short in the hills, but I just gear down and let it do its thing. If I keep my foot out of it, the fuel economy is better and the truck is overall happier. I always load my trailer where there is as little as possible on the tongue with the weight on the trailer wheels where it should be.

    JJ in TN
     
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  9. Darrel

    Darrel Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    I don't like tall tires for towing unless you move up to a bigger rim.
    35s on a 15" rim has a lot of sway. Ok going straight down a flat road, but not when things get hairy.
    A blow out with that combo will certainly get your attention as well.

    With your 33s/3.73 you can run 50-55 in 3rd gear if needed. 3200-3500 rpm respectively which is about perfect when loaded medium heavy.

    Stopping will be fine with hydroboost and old school 3/4 ton brakes. Just be wary of brake fade in the mountains.
    Good trailer brakes and controller of course.
     
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  10. stroker3

    stroker3 Lives in an IH Dealership

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    x2. Probably going beyond the original question but it's very important not to reach a speed that goes beyond good engine hold back. Going cross country I learned that no matter how fast I was able to pull a grade, as soon as we crested a hill and started down longer grades it was important not to gain too much speed right from the top. Guess this would vary but usually no faster than 50mph on the crest and then slow it down to 55 after it reached about 60 or so on the downgrade. Then repeat that with short hits on the brake as speed increased again. If it got near 70 or so it seemed as though it was free wheeling and it would start getting a little sketchy as far as decent braking was concerned
     
  11. holyrider

    holyrider Farmall Cub

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    This is the technique that semi drivers use, it allows the brakes to cool during the time that they are not applied. Continuous braking will overheat them in short order. Also a truckers rule of thumb is to descend in the same gear you would use to climb the hill
     
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  12. mallen

    mallen Y-Block King

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    mMke sure you have a proper load balancing hitch and a sway damper installed. Better yet two sway dampers. Ive used that setup to tow a 7000lb, 30 foot trailer without issues on a 1210.
     
  13. pwschuh

    pwschuh Farmall Cub

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    My truck is a little similar to yours, 1210 with a built 392. I run the stock Dana 60/Dana 44 combo with 3.73s and stock sized tires.

    I pulled a 24' enclosed car hauler with a Volvo station wagon coast to coast (San Diego to DC). Going across the southern Rockies was slow but never missed a beat. I would not run anything larger than 33's for towing. And I don't think you really need a dually.
     
  14. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

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    You guys are correct. I meant to respond to this and have been busy. Although I am not a professional driver I do find myself driving commercial vehicles with my occupation from time to time (busses and 18 wheelers) and hauled many cows to market back in the day (my family background is AG--ranch and dairy cows). In Colorado where I grew up, a must with mountain driving. The technique is called "Snubbing" with the braking, and Ray and Rob are right, rule of thumb is use the same gear up as in going down. Always please stay in the right lane unless overtaking :)


    JJ in TN
     
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  15. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

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    I would prefer a smaller tire size on my 200, but the 33 is that is available in a 16.5 wheel.

    JJ in TN
     
  16. BigRigg

    BigRigg Y-Block King

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    Thanks guys. This has been a lot of food for thought.

    So my next question is, are the d70 and ra15 worth anything? I'd like to sell them if I dont use them. I wouldn't have a project to put them in.

    Still on the fence....I wont tow a whole lot, and for some reason i like the way the truck would look with 18 inch rims, 35 inch tires on a dually. It's the kid in me i suppose.
     

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