Moates adapter Install/Chip socket replacement!

Discussion in 'Injection Tech' started by Bill USN-1, Feb 25, 2006.


  1. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    This is an optional change to the ECM for those that want to play with programming. This modification will make your life easier by eliminating the need to erase a chip with a UV eraser each time you program (burn) a new one.

    INSTALL TIME APROX- 1 HR

    Now that my Moates EEPROM adapter arrived I figure I need to install it.

    I will also show the socket I have been using for years on another ECM that allows me to just plug in a ZIF socket, the original chip without the plastic GM holder, or the Romulator that I use for Real Time-on the fly programming!!!

    Here's the ECM I started with. 1227747 C3 ECM.
    When ordering the parts remember the most common spacing for the 1227747 is the .6" pin spacing. That's what you see here!!

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    Here's the parts I ordered. The list and prices are in the How to read and change your program thread.

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    First thing to do is remove the screws and cover. Don't forget the 2 screws on top!!

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    Then the 2 screws for the small PCB-(printed circuit board) also called the daughter card, and the chips.

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    Here is the new socket next to the factory one.
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    The optional socket that I have used before comes from about any electronics store. I picked this one up from Fry's.

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    Here's the bottom of the card.

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    Everyone has their prefered method of removing solder. a standard solder sucker is nice but I don't have one!!

    But before we can remove solder there is a clear urethane all over the board that needs to be scraped off the pins. A simple jewlers screwdriver will work.

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    This is what I use at home to remove solder. It's soldering wick. I just coat a little flux on the the wick and as you heat it up over the joint, it will draw the solder to the heat!!

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    Now that the bottom is fairly clean lets move to the top.
    You can pop the plastic right off the pins so they can be removed 1 at a time.

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    Then you can use a pair of needle nose or forceps or just the jewlers screwdriver to apply slight upwards pressure as you heat the pin...

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    Then use the wick on the top to remove excess solder and clear the holes.

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    Then we start the install.

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    I used a piece of tape to keep in in the holes.

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    Make sure you are using a 25-30 watt pencil tip iron for this work!!!

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    And just when you think you are done...
    You find 3 partial solder joints!!!

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    With the solder work done this is how the parts stack up.

    The 24 pin socket is soldered into the board.
    The 24 to 28 pin adapter is stuck into the top of the 24 pin socket.

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    Just to give you an idea of what is being done with this adapter...
    Is is basically a pin for pin adapter except for the 4 pins on the exposed end.
    IIRC these should be pins 1, 2, 27, 28...these 4 pins are all tied to pin 26!!!

    So for the DIY guy, you could just take a 28pin socket and cut the 4 pins off the bottom, solder them together to pin 26 and then mount it in the board by it's self!!! (just another option that would make for a shorter stack)

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    Here's the stack with the optional ZIF socket.
    You can use the stock 24 pin EPROM or the 28 pin EEPROM.

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    Or just stick the standard 24 pin socket into the replacement socket and the stock chip can pop right in! (for when your done playing)

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    How about with it all together????

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    Note the original cover will not go over the ZIF.
    So to add a little dust protecion I used a little 200 MPH Duct tape!!!

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    Of course it all means nothing if it doesn't work!!!

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    Here is my other modified ECM with a standard 28 pin socket intalled.
    This allows you to just R&R the chip with out the holder, or install a zif socket, or plug in a romulator for real time programming!

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    Last edited: Mar 2, 2006
  2. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Here is the ECM with the cover installed just to show that it will fit if you use a standard socket and plug the chip in.

    As noted above you can use the 24 pin socket for the standard 2732 chips or the better option would be to modify a standard 28pin socket and install it. Then you can plug a 2732 or the EEPROM straight into the socket when you are done tuning.

    I would recommend using a piece of foam on top of the chip to hold tension down on it when the cover is installed.

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    Keep in mind that you can also just perform the 2732-27SF512 conversion as documented in the FAQs. That allows you to use a stock ecm so no mod is required should yours ever go bad on the road. This socket mod is great if you are using the ecm for tuning multiple engines and then just buring a chip and installing the factory ECM when done.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  3. Jim Grammer

    Jim Grammer Editor at large Staff Member Moderator

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    Bill, what's your preferred technique for "siamesing' the 4 extra pins to pin 26? Thanks.
     
  4. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    When using a 24 pin in a 28 pin zif i have simply stripped the insulation off the ends of a bread tie wrap and ran them from 26 around.
    I leave the insulation in the middle so it rest on top of the socket.
    Sort of like stripping the insulation off the ends of wire to install connectors.


    But to make a standard socket work full time and not interfere when you install the 28 pin eeprom, you will need to jumper on the board side of the socket.
    There is no real current draw so i would simply cut the legs off and use a single strand of copper wire from something like an 18awg that has been stripped and separated.
    Then just daisy chain the connections from 26 around to 2.

    I'll see if i still have a spare header or socket in the garage to play with.

    Another thought, If the legs of the socket are flat you may be able to just bend them towards each other to shorted the gap on the bottom. Won't work with the round legs!!
     
  5. rick W.

    rick W. Binder Driver

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    Discovered today that a 24 pin DIP adapter will plug right into a factory 24 pin memcal socket. I used a 28 pin DIP and cut the end off of it because that's what I had handy. It's not the best fit and not permanent by any means but works if you want to for instance use a emulator and not have to do any soldering. You could also use a piece of foam and the cover to hold the adapter tight into place as Bill wrote above. I'm sure I'm not the first to try this but this is the first that I have heard of it. No pictures, my camera isn't fine enough resolution. :)
     
  6. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If it works for you that's fine, I didn't use the original socket because of the plastic carrier. It fills the space in the socket and applies the tension on the connections.
    If you use the socket with the flat legs on it then it will probably lose connection or be intermittent. If you use a socket with the round legs they may be large enough to maintain connection.

    Make sense?
     
  7. rick W.

    rick W. Binder Driver

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    Yes, I used the socket with the round legs. I don't think their large enough to really fill the socket but ridged enough to not flare out when inserted. They more or less "squeeze" together and make contact. Again they seem to make pretty good contact but I would not do this long term. :D
     
  8. Jim Kyser

    Jim Kyser Farmall Cub

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    Bill,

    If one were going to play around with a spare socket like you describe in post 4, how about this.

    The reason you need to offset your binary image when you program to an EPROM/EEPROM larger than the original 2732 is that three of the added pins that get shorted to VCC are the upper address pins. Also, in the place of the old VCC pin there is a fourth new address pin that is also tied to VCC. Since they are all set to 1, you end up in the highest 4k byte block in the chip. If you were to tie these 4 pins to ground (pin 14 on a 28-pin DIP, pin 12 on a 24-pin DIP) instead, you would address the lowest 4k byte block and would not need to offset when you burn a chip. The tricky part is pin 26 because it is VCC (and actually pin 24) on the 2732, but is the 4th new address pin on the 28-pin DIPs.

    Here is a map of the pins for a 28-pin DIP to 28-pin DIP adapter. I put the appropriate pin number from the original 24-pin DIP next to the pins for the 28-pin DIP. Note that pin 27 still gets tied to VCC since this stops the EPROM/EEPROM from being writable:
    click
     
  9. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I guess another option would just be to put a small switch in there and swap it from a high to a low. Then you could load a couple bin files and just switch back and forth!!
    I think Mike and his brother in the Netherlands are playing with one right now.

    Moates has had an adapter out for a while to do just this.
    Depending on the chip size you could have up to 6 different bin files IIRC.

    There is just so much that can be done with these things!!

    I try to keep the ECM as close to stock as I can. I really like the idea of being able walk into any parts store and pick up a replacement.

    But for a dedicated tuning ECM ...it's great!! I have 2, each set up differently.

    Thanks for the great info on the chip pin out!!

    From Moates


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    Last edited: Mar 4, 2007

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