MiniBuild 19 ~ Shop Travelette

Discussion in 'D and C Extreme' started by Damian Grihalva, Apr 15, 2009.


  1. reddevil1111

    reddevil1111 Farmall Cub

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    Where is it at? Ill do a Johnny Cash on ya...it will be mine one chunk at a time...lol
    Call it blueberry. Call it whatever you like just gimme! (I will trade all my 800 parts, and both of my 800's) Deal Gilligan? lil Buddie? Come on!....:taz:
    Fine...if you wont gimme, I will get my own. And No deals for you on that 5sp w/od for you!:tt2:
     
  2. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    I always thought about TOY-LETTE for a travelette,just didnt fit mine when I built it.
    Jeff
     
  3. reddevil1111

    reddevil1111 Farmall Cub

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    I like it Jeff! I think it fits Damian as well...lol
     
  4. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Well folks. I don't know how to tell you this..... but...














































    IT LIVES!
     
  5. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Okay. I'll get some pictures later. But I've been needing to get the T-ette moving for quite some time. It was supposed to go to the trans shop this week but the tow-truck driver didn't want to load it all by his lonesome. :gun_bandana: ~ well, to tell you the truth, I wasn't too excited about moving ~ ahem PUSHING it either.

    So I go over to the shop today with the express intent to get the t-ette running again. It sat in my parking lot for at least a year and I know the PO had it sitting for a year or two as well. I had taken a look at it earlier, but when i found the battery didn't show ANY voltage, and the ignition coil was gone, I simply left it there. Today, I went and got another battery from the local auto parts store, and a 'high performance' coil as well.

    But first things first, battery goes in. I turn the key to see if anythings super wrong ~ but it starts cranking and so I let off and move to install the coil. The wiring was a bit thrashed, looks like whoever took the coil, simply cut it out and walked away. Jerk. So I grab the wire coming out of the distributor and put it to the negative side of the coil by simply wrapping it around the terminal and tightening the nut with my fingers.

    There's two wires that could be the positive, so I turn the ignition on and rub each one against a bolt in the manifold. One sparks, the other doesn't....so 'sparky' gets wrapped to the positive side of the coil.

    Okay, now its time to prime the carb. Looking for the most explosive fluid I have, I find a mostly empty bottle of Acetone. That'll do. DUMP.

    Okay, lets see what happens. I get behind the wheel, and start cranking. about 3-5 seconds goes by and I let off the key. As soon as I did, it kicks.

    "What was that..." I thought, Dumped the remaining Acetone down the carb and try again. Vroom! put-put-put....poo...(it died). I pump the throttle a few times, crank it again. This time it starts!

    I start feathering the throttle, its a really low idle, barely holding on. RPMs start picking up, not much, then I realize I'm rolling backwards. "OH CRAP! ~ NO BRAKES!" Turns out that the Autotrans shifter is messed up, and it doesn't really go into park. It will catch it a little, but its really in reverse. DOH!

    Anyway, I crank the wheel to the passenger side to miss a trailer and drop it into drive. The t-ette lurches forward, and dies.

    Crank-crank-crank......vroom.....put put put put put put....poo....
    Crank crank crank crank crank...put put put put put....

    'Oh good' as I put it back in reverse and start backing it into its new spot until Wayne can come get it on monday (to go for its trans swap).

    Anyway, I'm stoked, I don't know how long this thing has been sitting. I know I've used the bed for crap metal storage, but its good to have it start without much complaint. Now its time to get it running and driving. Goodness knows I need a running truck!
     
  6. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Well, it needed some work to keep it running, but not a whole lot. Here it is getting its VIN Verification (since it was an out-of-state truck).
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    First thing out of the guys mouth "It leaks"

    Ya, its been sitting officially for 3 years. Its to be expected.

    Then I drove it around. Filled both tanks with Supreme petrol with some serious carb cleaners in it
    [​IMG]
    I honestly think the mileage shown is actual.

    Engine bay looks pretty clean actually!
    [​IMG]

    Can you spot the new parts?
    [​IMG]

    To get it to this point we needed to replace the brake system.
    [​IMG]

    New alternator....
    [​IMG]

    Heater hoses....
    [​IMG]

    Voltage regulator...
    [​IMG]

    Battery....
    [​IMG]

    ...and the ignition coil.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Turns out that filling it full of gas wasn't a good idea, it started to leak out the filler so I decided I'd take if for a little drive. This proved to be helpful with the leak :D

    While I was out avoiding the cops (no plates) I pulled into a parking lot and did a walk-around with the digital camera.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Putting them all together into a massive GIF file.
    [​IMG]

    MONEY SHOT!
    [​IMG]
    :yes:
     
  8. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Well its been 3 days and I've gone through 1.5 TANKS of gas. Well, they are only 15-gallons, and I have been driving quite a bit, but still. WOW. Looks like I'm going to do some upgrades to the ignition and carb. Namely, I'm going to see if I can get a DUI, but I've asked my mechanic buddy about having the stock points-distributor rebuilt with new bushings, pertronix and a more advanced (sporty) advance curve.

    Also, I'm begining to look into the possibilities of fuel injecting this bad-boy as well.
     
  9. BO185

    BO185 Y-Block King

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    D. I am jealous! I loved your first one! Why not spring some cash for the MPFI intake!!!:D
     
  10. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    I would gladly sport an one of the IHOnly.com manifolds, but I believe they are out of the 345 ones. But still, I can't afford that on top of doing everything else I want to do to it. Perhaps in time.

    Thanks for the props on my first T-ette. That thing was a monster, and I loved it. But wait till you see what this one ends up like. Its going to be unlike any T-ette you've ever seen and 10x as cool as the last one.:rockon:
     
  11. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Pertronix and timing won't be of any use with EFI. A DUI cost more then an EFI system install.
    You make the call.

    The DS or mopar conversion and the 4 pin GM module will accomplish the same thing.
     
  12. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    They won't? Well, I'm worried about using a stock distributor as I'm sure the bushings and advances are way out. My goal with having the dissy rebuilt was for those two purposes ~ putting the Pertronix in there was just something I've always done on 4-bangers and is normally good.

    Oh, I do not plan on going with spark control unless you feel its the best way to go.

    Also, I have not done a duraspark conversion before, is it the best way to go with a TBI?

    My goal is to keep it cheap, and try something new. As you know, I'm a 'kit' guy. I could sell 'used' parts, but there is a certain amount of liability control when going with some companies kit than 'lets go get these parts and see if it flies!' ~ if you know what I mean. This rig, however, is my personal rig and I'd like to do something new and 'fresh'!
     
  13. Bill USN-1

    Bill USN-1 Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I presonally feel it is, but I'm sure you could find someone that feels it isn't.
    Howell sells all their kits fuel only.

    The distr choices are in the EFI FAQ's.
    DS, Mopar, GM/IH hibred.

    You can beform the DS or Mopar conversion and leave the mechanical and vacuum advance working so you can still run the carb.
    Then a simple tack weld on the advance shaft and disconnect the vacuum line is all that is needed for EFI when your ready.
    The GM/IH conversion makes a cleaner install but cost $140 to do the machining.

    AFI used to sell their kits with the GM/IH distr but now use the DS conversion for all their kits.

    I have ran both for years. The prototype GM/IH distr was the only one I had fail on me.
    The second one worked fine.
     
  14. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Damian here ~ how ya-guys doing. I've got a wild hair that has been pestering me since I got my T-ette running a few months ago. I want to pass it by you guys and see what you think.

    Since I have to hold off on building the t-ette till I get some customer rigs going, I wanted to share with each of you a little thing I'm going to be doing with this t-ette. I will be updating this thread with mirror posts of the build thread so you don't necessarily need to check both posts.

    Here ya go:

    A bit ago I picked up a 69 Travelette for a shop/family hauler. Its build thread is here on the Binder Planet. Its build will be long and tedious, but I've been building an old GTI on the side and found (through that venue) an inexpensive dyno guy that'll help me do some tuning.

    Point and Purpose: The idea is that I'll be upgrading the motor in the t-ette and getting dyno and mileage results after each upgrade. As you know, I put together some of the most detailed builds on the internet, and I take great pride in doing so. Over the past decades we've done some pretty great builds ~ for which I am grateful. But as the builds have gotten more and more complex, I have thought about what I'd like to put together to help the guys that just have an IH rig and want to get 'more' from it.

    Sure we all like see sweet rigs come together, but what can I do for them to help build up the average Joe? AKA ~ what can I do to be useful to them? As I've recently got the T-ette running and it's now a daily driver (about 300 miles per week), I've come up with some things I'd like to do.

    I talked with Jeff @ IHONorth a bit ago and he is unaware of any dyno-tested results for IH motors. True he did some on his brothers (IHOnly) RPT manifolds, but didnt' think there was anything else out there. So after a brief discussion and about a month of pondering/planning, I've decided that I'd like to create a 'what does what' thread (and also incorporate it as apart of my t-ette build).
    The plan: The plan is simple. Do one modification at a time getting real and recordable results from a dyno. The following is my personal view and steps in the form of 'Dyno Runs'

    Run 1: Stock ~ nothing done except new points and timing. This will establish a Baseline or starting point for the remaining runs.

    Run 2: + Ignition. To me, its important to make sure all the problems in your ignition are taken care of before any other modifications are done. Why? Mostly because if your ignition is in ill-repair (aka not burning fuel efficiently) any other modifications will most certainly be skewed. By making sure the ignition system is right, we know that the rest of the runs will yield reliable numbers.

    Run 3: Dual exhaust w/ headers. Doing this one 'first' because most people do it to their IH's first. Its easy, extremely common, relatively cheap, and most stock IH's need some exhaust work anyway!

    Run 4: 4bbl manifold and carb. Not as 'easy' as the exhaust, but still a popular upgrade. Many people do this but the results are not really that well known. As my T-ette has a 2bll now, I believe most people will be interested in seeing the results between the two.

    Run 5: Fuel Injection. Although this may not yield any more power, It'll be interesting to know what it will do in both power and mileage.

    Run 6: 392 swap with the components mentioned above. Will probably hurt mileage, but gain in power.

    So there you have it. As my t-ette needs all of the above, I think that doing this test-n-tune thread will give the IH community some 'hard' and realistic numbers concerning what the every-day-IHer can do to help their rig work better.

    DETAILS:
    Dyno testing: Will be done at UPP (UnderPressure Power and Performance) in Colorado Springs. I will note that our altitude will lessen the power but the % gain should accurate no matter where you live.

    Mileage: Highway mileage will be taken on a predetermined course going from Colorado Springs to Pueblo and back. We will fill up at the same station ~ if possible at the same pump ~ topping off both tanks to make sure we have an accurate consumption. City mileage will start JUST after that and will be taken over the following week (the average time it takes to empty the tanks from my truck).

    To restate. Although my t-ette will eventually be build up in my normal 'extreme' fashion, I want to do a build that will help the average Joe. Considering its current state, its in the PERFECT state to accomplish this ~ Something that will take an IH rig from a realistic 'just got it running' state and show what modifications can increase every-day drive-ability, power and economy. I will back each mod with dyno and mileage results ~ hard numbers that are, to my knowledge, currently not available.

    I hope that you guys will enjoy this build thread and find it usefull for many years to come.

    If you have any question, please let me know.
     
  15. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Well time has come and gone, and its time to update this thread a touch.

    First things first, I want to get a 'beginning' point. Although we'll be dyno'n the Travelette later, its time we found out if we can get any better numbers with some home-brew tune up stuff. What, if anything will come out of a basic 'garage-guy' tune-up. Once again, I've gotten 8.46 mpg once, and two other times I've gotten 8.65 and 8.69 mpg. Which is about what I'd expect from an IH vehicle in the city.

    First things first, materials. For basic tune-up stuff, I include: distributor cap, rotor, wires, plugs, timing adjustment, fluid changes, and some magic snake oil tricks that I've used in the past. Lets see what happens to the T-ette's mileage after that!

    First we have to find out what distributor cap and rotor you'll need. MOST times, you can't just walk into your favorite auto parts guy and say: "I have a '69 IH T-ette and need tune up stuff" ~ why? IH used any number of different dissy's and parts. For my particular truck, there are several possibilities. Knowing that its a points system, that narrowed it down to 3 different points/rotor setups.

    To find out which cap and rotor you need, you'll need to let the guy at the auto parts store see your rotor. So lets find out how to...well... find out.(For those of you who already know, please excuse the detail)

    First, your distributor is located on the front of the motor, near the water hoses.
    [​IMG]

    To remove the cap you have to remove the clamps that hold it on.
    [​IMG]

    A little tug with a screwdriver is easiest, but your fingers can work just as well.
    [​IMG]
    There are normally two clamps, so make sure you get them both.

    Pull the distributor cap off.
    [​IMG]

    The rotor is that black thing. Simply pull it off.
    [​IMG]
    (NOTE the plastic shield under the rotor)

    The parts guy should be able to recognize it from here.
    [​IMG]

    Removing the plastic shield under the rotor reveals the points and condenser.
    [​IMG]
    The Condenser is the cylinder on the lower right (about 5 0'clock), the points are opposite at about 10 or 11 o'clock. These two things trigger the coil. They do wear out and should be replaced at least yearly.
    IF YOUR PARTS STORE GUY HAS THE PARTS IN STOCK: VISUALLY CHECK THEM WITH WHAT YOU HAVE! The parts guy tried to sell me the wrong parts after looking at the right ones (and they were obviously wrong). As my luck would have it ~ and after a good 15 minutes. The guy at the parts store was unable to locate the set I needed but was pretty sure that he could find them and have them shipped in site-unseen.

    "Forget it" I said. "I'll try another store."

    My other store wasn't a 'store' ~ it was a shop. Jeff @ IH Only North (www.ihonlynorth.com) is a light-line dealer. By looking at the points, he'd know exactly what they were and have them in stock. The only problem was he's in California, I'm in Colorado. Never-the-less, a call was made, I sent that last digital picture of the points, and with a 'ship it!' the parts were on their way.

    Two days later:
    I got a small package.
    [​IMG]

    One of the things people easily overlook in a tune up is the small and harmless looking fuel filter. YOU REALLY NEED TO CHANGE THESE! The parts pack, came with one.
    [​IMG]

    Next was the points and condenser set. Gotta love not having to worry about getting the right one.
    [​IMG]

    Cap and rotor are extremely important. They carry the spark from the coil to the plug wires. If they are deteriorated, the spark will suffer and you'll loose power.
    [​IMG]

    That was all I got this time around. I told Jeff just to send what I'd need to do a basic tune. Total cost was $52.05. Not bad and the parts are right. Money well spent.
     
  16. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    But my trip to the auto parts store wasn't a complete waste. I did get a number of the other things I needed to do the tune up. And at the cost of just under $50, here they are.
    [​IMG]

    A closer look reveals:
    [​IMG]
    FILTER: The oil-filter is an obvious. I'm using a cheap and cheesy Fram because the I plan on changing the oil filter quickly, and so inexpensive is the name of the game. There are more expensive alternatives that are much better, and we'll be using those later.

    CARB CLEANER: Get a name brand. Something that feels comfortable. This is to do a quick clean up of the carb.

    OIL STABILIZER: Oil stabilizer makes the oil gooey ~ more so than it normally is. Keeps things coated with oil so start-ups aren't as harmfull. Also keeps your cam lubed, which is a problem with IH motors (as they normally wear out and/or go flat).

    OIL: FIRST NEVER USE PENZOIL OR QUAKER STATE. If you do, you'll die.:hammer: I use Valvoline, Havoline, Mobile1 or Amsoil (if available). I always use synthetic. WARNING ~ if you are just putting in synthetic, your motor may start leaking. Why? Because conventional oils (especially the two evil ones mentioned above) will actually produce sludge. I don't care how good you are at proper oil change intervals, THEY PRODUCE SLUDGE.

    Synthetic oil's have a formulation that will start breaking down that sludge. As it breaks it down, it'll uncover the dry engine seals the sludge has been covering. The oil will start leaking through until the seals re-hydrate and seal again. In other words, new oil leaks after starting to use synthetic oil is a sign that the motor is getting cleaned out and the oil is working.

    This is why I got a cheap oil filter. As the synthetic cleans the sludge, you'll need to change the filter more quickly than normal. This is just going to be a filter change, and I'll do it in about 500 miles.

    AS A POINT OF CHOICE: I normally use Mobil1 or Amsoil as my primary synthetic, but I couldn't find 20-50 which is what I use in the winter. If you're using conventional oil, or have the choice, IH's should be run on straight 30W (weight) oil.

    The last can is...
    [​IMG]
    SEAFOAM: Seafoam is the 'snake-oil' I told you about. Its a trick old guys have used for years. It can be used in a number of ways. So you can actually buy 3 cans. One, you can put in your oil (if you're running convensional oil ~ it is best to run this in the oil just before switching to synthetic). It will lubricated the upper cylinder head well, and start loosening up any sludge and clean out lifters. Second, in the gas Seafoam acts as a fuel conditioner, cleaning your fuel system (carb, jets, and lines)

    Third, poured down the intake. Which is what I'm about to do. This is an old trick from yesteryear. Question, how do you clean the carbon buildup off your valves and intake without pulling apart your motor? Answer. Seafoam (some old farts use water too, but that's just crazy-talk).
    [​IMG]

    The can will give specific and detailed 'proper' instructions on it. But this is the way I do it. Basically, with the motor running and TOTALLY WARMED UP ~ pour the can down the carburetor, like so...
    [​IMG]

    TRY to keep the engine running as long as possible. I normally use both hands, one pouring the can, one hitting the throttle to keep it going. Obviously, the motor will die and stop running. If that happens, well ~ turn off the ignition and go make yourself a sandwich.

    Look I spilled. Man my carb is dirty.
    [​IMG]

    After about 5 minutes of letting the SeaFoam do its thing. Re-start your motor. Yes, it won't want to at first. But as soon as it does....
    [​IMG]
    ...it'll smoke like a son-of-a-gun. This is normal ~ Expect it. Stand back and watch it. Look around to see if anyone thinks your rig is on fire and stop them from calling fire fighters.

    After a few minutes the smoke will die down.
    [​IMG]

    And then a little more.
    [​IMG]

    SeaFoam done.

    What is happening, as if I knew, is that the humidity from the seafoam sitting in the motor loosens the carbon buildup and cleans out your combustion camber. When you start your motor back up, the carbon is expelled through the exhaust. You've just cleaned the top-end of your motor. You may find performance gains just in that alone.

    Pretty snake-oil-ish isn't it.

    Hey man, there's a reason the instructions are printed on the can. I didn't come up with this myself you know. :D
     
  17. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    The last thing we'll cover today is the carb cleaner 'incident'
    [​IMG]
    Did I get your attention. I'm just using the carb cleaner now. I'm sure I'm mis-using this stuff, but this is how I do it.

    Basically, with the motor still running (fresh off the SeaFoam), I stick the carb-cleaner tube thingy into the main barrels of the carb and start hosing stuff down. You will need to rev the motor to keep things running, but the point is, clean off stuff.

    To get into the carb itself, I stick the tube into the float bowl's vent like so....
    [​IMG]
    ...and keep spraying as much as will fit in there. The hope is that the additional level inside the float bowl will cut off the fuel supply and (within a short time) the motor will be running on pure carb cleaner. This will suck it through every passageway inside the carb including the jets and up the venturies. I do this as long as I can stand it ~ takes a while you know.

    Afterwards, and with the last bit left in the can, I wash the outside of the carb .... because it looked like this:
    [​IMG]

    With the cleaning, it looks substantially better.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Next, we'll cover installation of the points, condenser, plugs, cap and timing. Then we'll get some new mileage numbers and see what this thing does one the dyno. But we'll save that for another day.
     
  18. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Moving on.

    Time to start on the stock tune-up stuff. As noted before, I had some trouble getting parts from my local parts house since IH came with such a variety of possibilities. IN the end, I ended up calling Jeff, the owner of IH Only North (www.IHOnlyNorth.com) ~ since he's a LightLine dealer, and has access to the parts AS WELL AS the knowledge to make it easy on me (I don't like thinking!) I gave him a call. As covered before, he sent some basic tune-up stuff, now its time to install them.

    Some other things we got from Jeff over at IHOnlyNorth were a new air filter.
    [​IMG]
    Yes you can get this from your local part house, but I already had things coming from Jeff, so why not get it from him and support one of our own?

    Stacking it up on the old Fram filter, you can see that the Fram is all but used up. By replacing the air filter you actually get a MASSIVE improvement on air-flow.
    [​IMG]

    Next, the fuel filter. Fuel filters are easily forgotten and can be missed. This one, although it was fairly new, had already camouflaged itself with the rest of the engine bay!
    [​IMG]
    By replacing the filter, you're protecting your carb from particles that get sucked up from the fuel tank. These include dirt, rust and anything else that may have gotten in there. A clogged filter can help save your fuel pump as well as the carb (since the pump has to work harder to push fuel through a clogged one.
    [​IMG]
    All filters should have a directional mark on them. This one has an 'IN'. This means to put this side of the filter towards the fuel pump.

    New filter installed with hose clamps.
    [​IMG]


    Moving onto the distributor. We'll be replacing the points and condenser, as well as the distributors cap and rotor. To start, we removed the cap and rotor, exposing the dissy's internals.
    [​IMG]

    It is important ~ especially if the vehicle has driven recently ~ to make sure the condensor isn't holding any residual charge. The condenser is the cylinder thingy in that last picture. You see, as the motor runs, the coil delivers spark. Excess voltage created by the physics of the coil is absorbed in the condenser. If there is anything left in there, if you remove it, you may be in for a shock (upwards of 40,000 volts ~ but dont worry, there isn't enough amps to cause you harm ~ just a good old fashion ZAP!).

    To discharge the condenser, we turned off the ignition power (by unplugging the coil's positive) and cranked the motor for a second....
    [​IMG]
    .. or your can discharge it with your finger. Its up to you:wacko:

    Condenser removed....
    [​IMG]

    Then the points. Note the only tools needed was a flat-head screwdriver.
    [​IMG]

    Lets look at the points. The points open/close the coil circuit by providing a momentary ground. The two surfaces of the points look like little circlular blocks that close on each other. The current flow across them slowly burns them up until they're useless. New they look clean, old and they get all distorted. Old technology, but effective for its purpose.

    Here's what my t-ette's points look like. See if you can tell if they're burnt up or not.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the other side.
    [​IMG]
     
  19. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Together they 'click' or fit inside of each other.
    [​IMG]
    Basically my points were fried and most likely planning on leaving me stranded on the side of the road. What are supposed to look like two bricks, looked like the 'plugs' of a 9volt battery. Not good.

    Oh, speaking of which, the screws that hold the points and condensor in the dissy are small and should be placed somewhere they wont fall and be lost. In our case, we use the air cleaner as it's ridges keep them from rolling.
    [​IMG]

    Here's a little thing that I'd like to pay particular attention to. Its a little dark-gray capsule. It, or something like it, comes with every set of new points. What is it?
    [​IMG]
    Grease. A special grease for use on the points.

    See the silver dot? That is the point that rides on the distributor shaft. It needs to be lubricated to keep it alive.
    [​IMG]

    Here's another shot of the new point set with the grease applied.
    [​IMG]
    If you don't apply the grease, your new points will not last long ~ and worse than that, they will wear down the distributor block that opens/closes the points ~ which will render the distributor useless if worn completely out (which doesn't take much time)

    Next we start installing the new parts. You can see the new condenser screwed down. But do you see the cooper color ground wire (pointed to by the screw driver)? Whomever worked on this last had the grounding wire on the same small screw that held the condenser, however it was to short and they almost stripped it out the plate it screws into when they installed it.
    [​IMG]
    Had they actually stripped it, the whole distributor would have needed to be removed and rebuilt to replace the base-plate. So please, be careful, the screw that it is currently held down with is purposefully longer to account for the thickness of the grounding wires terminal, and connects to the points (as shown).

    Next we set the gap in the points. Jeff said to start with .017" (seventeen thousandths) and go from there. So with a feeler gauge, and having cranked the motor so that the points were at max-open, we set the total opening to .017".
    [​IMG]

    This sets the 'dwell' ~ which is pretty much how much time the coil has to charge between firing the spark plugs. To much or to little can give a bad spark, which greatly reduces power.
    [​IMG]

    With the initial setting, done, re-assemble the distributor...
    [​IMG]
    ..., start the motor and, using a dwell-meter, check to insure the dwell is around 25-30.
     
  20. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

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    Next comes the cap. The cap is slotted to fit on the distributor, so make note of the slot....
    [​IMG]

    And match it to the part on the distributor that it fits over (screwdriver is pointing at it).
    [​IMG]

    Mark noted something that I thought was interesting. You should see that the #1 plug on the cap should be closest to the waterneck.
    [​IMG]

    The arrow is pointing to the "1" actually printed on the cap!
    [​IMG]
    From here you can start putting the wires on according to the firing order ~ which is printed on the valve covers and/or intake manifold.

    Or you can do like we did. Hold the old cap (which still has the wires on it) in the proper orientation and then simply transfer the wires one by one from the old to the new cap.
    [​IMG]

    I will note that Jeff also sent us a set of 7mm wires with our tune-up kit. We have to 'build' these wires to the fitment of our Scout, which is a little more difficult to do, but makes them a perfect fit when we're done.
    [​IMG]
    Although you can build the wires with common hand tools, Mark says that he's got a nifty tool especially for this ~ and I'm dying to see it done (Mark has well over $70k in tools, and some are just to freakin' sweet to pass up using. So we'll cover the building of the wires at a later date ~ probably throw some plugs in there while were at it.

    With the 30-45 minutes that it has taken so far, I must say that the truck has a NOTICEABLE change in power. I can only imagine what the extra power will do for the fuel consumption (not having to floor it all the time) as well as what the initial Dyno numbers will yield ~ and we're not done yet!
     

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