MiniBuild 17 ~ Jay M

Discussion in 'D and C Extreme' started by Damian Grihalva, Oct 26, 2008.


  1. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Like a dork, I didn't get any beginning pictures of this beast before tearing it apart ~ sorry about that. This Scout comes from beautiful BC in the great white north. Jay has stated 'why buy a new SUV when you can build one better for cheaper' ~ and hence here we are. Meet, Project Canuck (after the Vancouver Canucks)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    We pulled Canuck in while the shop was still fresh with the smell of epoxy floor paint. It was definately a nice place to tear into the Scout. And so we did.

    Quickly we realized how much Jay likes using his Scout. Right off had we noticed it was pretty dirty. And not just that, it was going to get one heck of a makeover. First to go was the suspension system. Although we're only doing a CompSOA, it turns out that the front axle was a Dana30 ~ so it had to go.
    [​IMG]

    So we removed the suspension parts...
    [​IMG]

    And dropped out the D30.
    [​IMG]

    Next we started on the rear suspension.
    [​IMG]

    The rear axle is a D44 so we set it off to the side for some cleaning and prep'd it for a rebuild.
    [​IMG]

    Then I got busy on some much needed cleaning ~ nothing like a wire-wheel on a grinder.
    [​IMG]

    Here you can see Jay already replaced the motor with a brand-new Jasper unit. Just barely broken in!
    [​IMG]

    With the frame cleaned up, we noticed something bad..
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2008
  2. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Here's a close up, the front shackle hanger area.
    [​IMG]

    And another of the back spring hanger.
    [​IMG]

    These brakes are actually pretty common for scouts that are actually used for 4x4'n. Basically, the frame gets weak as the scout gets beat repeatedly. We welded the holes solid and proceeded to the suspension.

    Rear suspension is easy. Just bolt in the new springs and move to the front. These are SkyJacker 2" SoftRide lift springs.
    [​IMG]

    The front will be treated with our RS (Reverse Shackle) kit. Although it argueable if ANY RS kit will give more flex, it DEFINATELY softens the ride quite a bit. This makes long trips and/or poorly maintained roads much more comfortable.

    RS tower ready to go in.
    [​IMG]

    Towers in.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Obviously we found a Dana44 for the front end. This will give Jay much more strength in the front axle shafts and housing.
    [​IMG]

    Springs hung.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Shackle mount in.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Before haning the shackles Paul did some more clean up to the frame.
    [​IMG]

    Front axle in, and ready to turn.
    [​IMG]

    Rear axle is extremely dirty. Time to get busy.
    [​IMG]

    Paul goes to town.
    [​IMG]

    Although its much cleaner ~ we'll be power-washing these axles before paint.
    [​IMG]

    Rear axle in, Front axle in, pinion set, knuckles turned...looking pretty good!
    [​IMG]

    Then we started assembling the front axle. We're using Chevy Flat-top knuckles with this Scout. This will give better road manners expecially over rough or bumpy roads and is standard on the CompSOA package.
    [​IMG]

    Canuck then went outside while we waiting for its gears/lockers to come in.
    [​IMG]

    Once the gears and lockers were in, Canuck was brought back in for dissassembly.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Once back into the shop, the axles were pulled back out for rebuild. Jay wants his Scout to crawl AND do highway speeds. The best way to get exactly what we want, rebuild the axles.
    [​IMG]

    To get some decent in-town pickup, we wanted low gears (numerically high). But to get great highway speeds, we wanted to keep the gears high (numerically low). Normally I use 4.27 gears in my own vehicles, but since Jay drives long distances to get to his job site, we chose 4.09 gears to compliment his 35" tires. With a call to my gear/locker supplier, a couple boxes showed up.
    [​IMG]

    Inside we found a full set of master rebuild kits, new Yukon 4.09 Ring and Pinions, and some good old...
    [​IMG]
    ARB Lockers. Even though ARBs (or any other selectable) are more expensive than traditional lockers, they also have the ability to be turned off. This means that while in town or on the highway, they won't adversely effect gas mileage or tire wear. Because they can be turned on with a flick of a switch, if Jay gets into something really nasty, he will have the benifet of a fully locked differencial ~ on demand!
    [​IMG]

    With the axles squared away, we turned our attention to the interior. The top had to be taken off for a couple reasons. First, Canuck will be getting a full Evo-style roll cage. Second, we'll be completing the total re-wiring job Jay started after he got the Jasper motor installed. Third, because when we're done, the entire interior will be replaced and looking HOT! So taking off the top is the best way to complete those jobs.
    [​IMG]
    Come to think of it, the back end of Canuck is pretty clean!

    No so with the front, as we stripped it clean. Luckily for us, Jay already de-wired the dash, so it was just a matter of taking things out.
    [​IMG]

    Then what's left of the carpet came up with its accompanying tar paper.
    [​IMG]

    A little bit of pulling, a little bit of wire-wheeling...and a little bit of chipping and we were left with a surprisingly clean floor...on the passenger side.
    [​IMG]

    Unfortunately not so much on the driver side.
    [​IMG]

    In fact, the driver-side floor may just need some....well, I was going to say patching, but a new floor board is the best answer here. Besides, the rockers and floor supports are really pretty decent.
    [​IMG]

    All said and done we almost filled a trashcan with dirt, carpet, sound dentening, and misc.
    [​IMG]
    Don't worry Jay, we saved the change we found!
     
  5. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    What a wild last couple weeks. Besides misplacing my camera, we've done a bit of stuff to Canuck. I don't have pictures of everything, nor do I have a ton of time to post what I have, but I'll try to post what I do.

    With the axles out and getting rebuilt, we turned our attention back to the insides of Project Canuck. Namely, what's going in it. Jay wanted some lockable storage and asked us to build him safe storage areas in the form of seat bases. With that in mind, I picked up some 14 gauge sheet metal and we started mocking some up.

    Using the stock seat base as a template, we built a slightly bigger version that's completely enclosed.
    [​IMG]

    Plasma torches are KEY to all the cutting. Got a steady hand?
    [​IMG]

    The main seat base box is tacked together.
    [​IMG]

    Next we figure out the doors.
    [​IMG]
    (The doors will be in front).

    The doors will be locked via these truck box latches available from most truck stores. These are lockable and best-of-all, they are the same strong units that you'll see on in-bed cargo boxes in construction of service beds. The keys are even the same!
    [​IMG]

    Latches in doors, next to the boxes.
    [​IMG]

    Here are the pair of bases.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Sitting in the rig.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Got some extra time so here are a few more..

    Seat bases in place
    [​IMG]

    They will be VERY sturdy for a couple new additions.
    [​IMG]
    bling-bling.

    The only thing was that the driver side floor was pretty rough, although we didn't get too many pictures of it, Paul went to work with the remainder of the 14-gauge to build some new floors.
    [​IMG]

    14-gauge isn't only stronger than the stock floor materials, Paul also put a bend in it where it'll attach to the inner trans tunnel area. This bend allows for better welding AND strength which will serve Jay and Canuck for YEARS to come.
    [​IMG]

    Installed.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    More on the seats and bases put in later.
     
  7. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Updates ~ and a ton of pictures coming tonight.
     
  8. xyz12383318

    xyz12383318 Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 5, 2007
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Burley, Idaho
    Those seat storage boxes are great! Could you pm me on a price for a set for my Scout.
     
  9. Ki Areese

    Ki Areese Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2006
    Messages:
    765
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    massachusetts
    x2.. mine are pretty well shot and I'd be interested in some replacements..

    On another note, I like the choice of 14 gauge sheet for the floor.. I went stupid over kill and got 11.. probably a little too much.
     
  10. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Getting back to the build.

    The cage was next on the list of to-dos. But in order to do that, we needed to get the dash cleaned up and 'shaped'.

    First we removed all the little bits off the main dash panel.
    [​IMG]

    Then we started cleaning and fixing the dash. Turns out that there was some pretty bad damage to the panel beneath the speedo, most will be covered by the new round-hole dash, but some would not. Since the original dash was torn, we cut out a rectangle then used new metal to fix it up.
    [​IMG]

    We then cut out the areas needed to be removed for the new gauges.
    [​IMG]
    (note red arrow marking the damaged area before fixin).

    Then a generous sanding and cleaning with Acetone and other solvants
    [​IMG]

    Metal primer to start.
    [​IMG]

    Glovebox door.
    [​IMG]

    Dash panel temporarily reinstalled so that we can get good fitment with the cage.
    [​IMG]

    Moving onto the cage. We're doing a version of the Evo cage. This is the Tera-top main hoop combined with a standard Scout II family cage spreaders.
    [​IMG]
    I personally love teh forward slope of the main hoop from the bed rails up. It makes it little more agressive looking.

    Door open, you can see how the front spreaders bend forward under the dash, this gives leg room AND keeps the strength of using tube steel all the way to the floor.
    [​IMG]

    Starting on the back.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    These boxes are a pain to build. They look pretty straight forward, but to get the shape right it took forever. I completely understand why one Scout vendor no longer offers them. As not to beat around the bush, I couldn't build them for under $500-600 a pair. I realize that's a bit on the expensive side, but in all honesty, it took about 2.5 days to build this set. I realize that's a long time, but for a prototype set, it definately wasn't as quick of a job as I had anticipated.

    Next time, I'll definately use a different welding style that will lessen the grinding/sanding/finishing. On these we tried to TIG them (as Paul is an advanced TIG guy) but we couldn't russle up a decent TIG welder. So we ended up MIG'n them together. Paul did it and literally seam welded them inside and out. WAY overkill and it took FOREVER. I showed him a different style of welding on the bottoms that cut production time and sanding down a ton. Nice to know I was able to teach a guy fresh out of advanced welding school a thing or two still.:cowboy:

    I used 14 gauge for Snoopy's floor too. Not as heavy as 11 (or 1/8") but I'll agree, a bit too much. However, we did use 14 gauge for these boxes since they are smaller and need to support you in event of an emergency. Overkill? Probably, but with such a small box, the weight thing wasn't as important as the strength. Dare you to break into them!:batman:
     
  12. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Paul bending up more tube.
    [​IMG]

    The rear spreaders needed some hand-grinding to match the spreaders to the bent-forward main hoop to get a good weld gap. This doesn't take long and is very easy.
    [​IMG]

    The top is put back on to test fitment.
    [​IMG]

    From the inside we also took some measurements for the rear cross-bar. We'll be doing something a little different on this cage and wanted to insure we had the room.
    [​IMG]

    Moving back to the seats. With the rough cage work in, it was time to do some more test fitting. Namely, I wanted to make sure all the work on the seat/storage boxes wasn't waisted on them being too high. So we got crackin' Seat boxes in the stock location.
    [​IMG]

    We then measured the mounting holes of the Corbeau BajaRS seats WITH the sliders attached.
    [​IMG]

    Seats. I love Corbeau seats. Since I had them in Snoopy, I've had one heck of a time going to anything else. In fact, I haven't.
    [​IMG]

    Lining up the sliders on the seat boxes.
    [​IMG]
    If I had it to do over, I'd make the boxes longer).

    Sliders mounted.
    [​IMG]
     
  13. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Taking a quick side-step ~ back the the cage.

    The cage was put back in to check things out. Fitment looks good, as well as the headroom in back.
    [​IMG]

    We also put a couple of extra bends in the back 'hatch bar' to give more room for people in back.
    [​IMG]

    Paul got to welding feet plate in.
    [​IMG]

    Then we bend and installed rear diagnols. This emphasizes the 'agressive' look of the Scout but gives TONs of bracing to the main hoop (in case of a rollover) without taking much room.
    [​IMG]

    We also put in small tube gussets from the rear spreaders to the hatch bar.
    [​IMG]
    These will also serve as hand-holds or tie-locations for cargo or Scout surfing in the great north snow (think of the scout as a powerboat and a line pulling a dude on a sled/snowboard :rockon: )

    DEAD SPIDER!!
    [​IMG]
    Much like the 'hover scout' pictures you can get when there's no axles on Scouts, this is another picture I can't seem not to take. Pretty much we remove the cage for welding. Getting it out of Canuck does a couple things. First it allows us to flip/twist the cage to get to all the welded joints as comfortably as possible, but it also protects the Scout from damaged from welded (not that Canuck has much interior in it presently).

    A few more shots of the cage welded up.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    With Paul working on the cage (seen above), I was busy with the seats.
    [​IMG]
    So beautiful.

    Anyway, you'll notice I'm using the passenger seat (note the lack of recliner lever on the outside). Why? Because it sustains less wear than the driver seat. So I use it as the mock-up to make sure we get it mounted where I want it.
    [​IMG]
    Although this is the seat in stock location, this mock-up wasn't just for pictures. Sliding the seat forward would be far to tight for an adult, and sliding the seat back would give room for a TALL adult, however, in a comfortable spot (for me) the seat seemed too far back, so I'll be mounting the seat box about 1" rear of its stock location so that the seat will be more 'on top of it' when in normal position.

    With protective plastic from shipping back in place, Paul and I took a seat.
    [​IMG]
    Man these things are comfy.

    Then we removed the seat, reinstalled the cage, and put back in the seat to see how close the seat was to the cage.
    [​IMG]
    (as you can see, the seat is pushed back on the base. Even though its safe and sturdy, this is why I'm moving the seat base back that 1", just to keep the back more evenly beneath the seats.

    One from the other side.
    [​IMG]

    With the door closed and backing off. Some of these pictures is deceptive, but here you can see the clearance between the seats and the cage.
    [​IMG]

    With the door open, the plastic makes it seem worse, but you can see a little how far back the seat is on the base.
    [​IMG]

    Once more stepping back.
    [​IMG]

    Finishing off the tube work on the cage we went with some rear CB bars, bent to match the rear bar and gussets. This also solidifies the rear structure of the cage as well.
    [​IMG]
    The reason we did not put these bars up front is simple. We are adding a Tuffy Overhead Security console up there and its a whopping 10" wide. Had we put bars on either side of it, it'd be 14" wide. That's a bit too much for my blood and could be painfull on the head! Therefore we opted to negate the bars up front and set the rear bars to the width of the consule we'll be using. After everything is coated and installed, it should make for a really nice look from windshield to rear hatch.

    Lastly. We turn back to the dash. Its still in primer now, but soon you get the picture(s) of the new dash installed with paint and gauges.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Well, its been quite a while since I've uploaded new pictures, but there has been tons of progress, so lets get crackin'

    Stepping back to the cage, we added this plate to the top center for a Tuffy Security Console to be mounted up there.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    This will allow us to bolt it firmly to the cage structure (you'll be seeing that later), but for now, the cage is off to powdercoating.

    Getting back to the interior, its time to take a look at whats going to happen with the dash ~ have seat:
    [​IMG]
    Need gauges!

    To get gauges in place, we needed to get the wiring in, so here we go. First step is to remove the wiring that came with the vehicle. Jason was nice enough to have just enough wiring to get it in here, but with all the stuff we're putting into this (such as OBA) we needed to put a new harness in. With that, everything needed stripped.

    The old wiring needed removed. As most of you know, Scouts come with modifications made by PO's (previous owners) ~ this usually means trying to reuse the old harness system is difficult at best, so all this is coming out.
    [​IMG]

    Where did this go? We don't know, it was just hangin out.
    [​IMG]

    Stripped clean.
    [​IMG]

    Here's an interesting shot. As some of you know, the factory runs the rear tail-light harness through the frame. This is nice because it keeps it out of the way, but it also can hide problems too. When we pulled the factory stuff out of the frame, this is what we found.
    [​IMG]
    TWO places where the wires had got so hot, they melted. Gee, I wonder why Jay wants Canuck to have new wiring? I can only guess what kind of electrical gremlins these ares caused!

    Before
    [​IMG]

    After
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    After stripping Canuck clean, the next step is to find a place for the new fuel panel. We're using a 21-curcuit EZ wiring harness for this, and we chose to place the new panel right where the old was.
    [​IMG]

    Stepping back, for a full interior shot. It'll be interesting to see this dash and interior come together as the build progresses.
    [​IMG]

    All climate-control devices cleared out as well.
    [​IMG]

    With the new fuse block in place, we started running the various wiring harnesses to their locations. You can do this on the floor, or in the rig ~ or both! But starting with plan is the best was to go, so if your doing this yourself, take the time to untangle what needs untangled, and lay out the various harnesses as much as you can.
    [​IMG]

    Here we start seperating the 'engine' harness from the 'rear' harness.
    [​IMG]

    Rear harness seperated out, and electrical taped for keeping it clean.
    [​IMG]

    Matt, the same guy you saw working on the Evo project, wires Canuck. Wiring is best done by a guy with more patience than I do! So he's got the job!:yes: He chooses to start at the front and work his way back. Here's the front all stripped clean.
    [​IMG]

    To make sure we have a safe and completely watertight connection, we discard the connectors that come with the harness, and use shrink-wrap connectors (seen in blue). Then we put an additional length of strinkwrap over the connectors shrink wrap.
    [​IMG]

    These will hold up to the harshest conditions ~ and they look good too.
    [​IMG]

    Rubber covered plated-steel straps keeps the harnesses in place and clean. We normally give more room than needed up front to help to allow for the removal of the headlights without pulling/stressing on the wiring.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    With the front wiring done, we move to the engine bay.
    [​IMG]
    Ya, I tied the DUI Live-Wires together for cleanliness.

    Next the harnesses were seperated and lumed into two runs.
    [​IMG]
    Although you can run all wires in one big loom, its nice to have them seperated in case of problems down the road. For instance: Lets say you have a short in the rear harness, if chasing one wire in a group of 20-30 tangled ones makes you cringe as much as it does me ~ then I'd say you can see why it'd help to have this seperation. Yes it does take a little time, but its time well spent.

    One run is the rear harness (tail lights and such), one is the engine bay's harness (includes the ignition, tach lead, alt connections, etc.).
    [​IMG]

    First, the engine's main wiring was run together and up the passenger-side valve cover ~ this includes the electric choke, Distributor 12-volt hot, tach lead and alternator's leads.
    [​IMG]

    We ran the alt's wiring to the old, even though it'll be replaced with a VERY high-output unit VERY quickly. These leads include an excitor, feed to the fuse block (output) and a secondary high-amp bypass wire that'll feed extra amps directly back to the battery.
    [​IMG]

    Since Canuck will be getting an OBA (on-board air) system, additional harness with relays were placed on the passenger side inner fender. This system (seen later) will run twin 100% duty cycle compressors, so these two 30-amp relays will feed heavy wires back to the rear with the 'rear' harness.
    [​IMG]

    While the rest of the 'engine' harness terminates at the starter, the rear harness continues back along the frame to the rear of Canuck.
    [​IMG]

    Keeping things clean and out of the way is the name of the game. Here you see Matt pre-drilling holes in the frame for more clamps.
    [​IMG]

    With the rear harness in loom, the clamps are set pretty much 12-18" apart and will run the length of the frame.
    [​IMG]

    While we're on the subject, here's a pre-loomed picture of how the OBA's wiring.
    [​IMG]
     
  18. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Now we move back to the interior ~ though we forgot didn't ya!

    With the wiring in the engine bay pretty much complete, we move to the dash, first thing first, install the newly painted dash.
    [​IMG]

    Canuck was WAY more complete than Evo when it showed up, but we did notice a few things missing. Can you guess which things?
    [​IMG]

    Ya, the glove box was one missing item, but in reality, we needed a few dash bits and peices, so I made a call to Mr. Scout in Eugene Or. Mike (the owner of said establishment) has been an invaluable resource to me throughout my ~ relative to his ~ short career. He's got the parts, and if you need stuff you think you can't get, give him a call at 541-688-3232 ~ and let him know you saw him on one of my builds.

    Anway, I needed a few things. Headlight switch, wiper switch, ashtray, defroster clips, and ~ as you saw ~ a glove box. With a quick call, and a few days wait (literally, he sent the stuff and it got here in like two days)... here's what we got.
    [​IMG]

    To keep with a clean and matching look, these headlight and wiper knobs cleaned to near new condition with some soap and water.
    [​IMG]

    I ordered a scout (or two's) worth of defroster clips. Canucks were missing completely, but seeing I'll be re-building a couple scouts and having YET to see one with these intact, I got extras.
    [​IMG]

    A nice glove box. Man, even Cringer (MiniBuild 11) with only 25,--- miles on it didn't have one in this good shape.
    [​IMG]

    Jay has warned me about Canuck going topless. Infact he's even said he may not have a top on it at all ~ so I took the time to 'weather proof' the glove box. This is the same cardboard glovebox with spray-can undercoating on it. I threw down about 3 thick layers and let them dry completely before...
    [​IMG]

    Throwing down another later of rustoleum enamel. This thing not only looks a ton better, I'd trust it to hold up submerged in water!
    [​IMG]

    The ashtray was a nice site, albeit the wrong color.
    [​IMG]
    Everything slid right and smooth...and with a little sanding, some primer, and a little paint...
    [​IMG]

    it looks pretty dang nice. Even with that picture makes the paint looking a little rough, here's another shot of it, without the flash.
    [​IMG]
    smokin!
     
  19. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Still assembling.... Its time to connect the OBA switch and gauge.
    [​IMG]
    YES this switch and gauge could be mounted in a cleaner spot, but when I thought about 'what situation will you be using it' the answer was not 'from the driver seat' ~ the switch and gauge can easily be moved, but for now, I stuck it where it can be easily reached and turned on without climbing INTO the rig.

    Dash installed.
    [​IMG]

    Other side.
    [​IMG]

    Seat bases mounted. We not only bolted them down, but welded the corners a little for strength and security.
    [​IMG]

    Moving on, lets get to the powertrain. Jay gave Canuck a new Jasper motor before bringing it to us. It got, amung other things, an Aluminum 4bbl intake from www.IHOnly.com and we provided a DUI distributor. Now it was time to back that fresh IH power up with something worth mentioning. Here the stock TF727 automatic was removed and prepped for some serious parts.

    [​IMG]

    Closer look.
    [​IMG]
     
  20. Damian Grihalva

    Damian Grihalva High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    2,158
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Colorado Springs
    Lets talk about automatic transmissions a little shall we?

    The first thing you hear about is 'stall speed'. There is some arguement concerning what 'stall speed' you want with your auto. Personally, I got high, some argue low. How about the factory? What did the factory use? Mid ~ or normal. Here's the stock 'mid-stall' converter. Its stall speed is about 1200-1400 RPM.
    [​IMG]
    If you'd like to know why I use the higher stall converters, please take a look at my FULL EXPLANATION: CLICK HERE!
    Here's Canucks off-the-shelf 'high' stall converter.
    [​IMG]
    It has a stall speed of about 1800 RPM ~ or 400 over stock.


    One big thing to mention here. Converters have different mounting holes. The new converter has a mount of about 10" wide (showing its a 11" converter).
    [​IMG]
    The stock converter was a 12" converter, having a 11" mount. THIS IS NOT A PROBLEM. Some scouts came with smaller converters, some with the bigger. If you have this problem, simply have a machine shop put new holes in your flex-plate (flywheel). This is perfectly safe and done regularly.

    Now onto 'a' main showcase...
    [​IMG]

    This clean little trans is no 'stock' IH 727. Its been rebuild and sightly modified for Canuck. What's it have in it? Can you guess?
    [​IMG]

    The guys with keen eyes can see imediately that the rear tailshaft housing (also called an 'extension housing') is of the 'round' variety. That means one thing ~ Its been converted to the 'Jeep' tailshaft. This allows us to literally bolt on an Atlas, Klune, or Stack aftermarket t-case without any problem. But that's not why its there. Jay wants an 'over-the-top' Scout without the 'break-the-bank' pricetag, and you can get that from a Jeep Dana300 ~ which will be mated to the end of this later.

    But that's only the begining to the relatively mild modifications that have been done to this TF727. As a start, a TF727 is equivalent to GM's Turbo400. The TF727 was used in drag cars, jet boats, RV's/Campers, and even behind the Cummin's TD in Dodge trucks. Not being a 'light duty' trans to begin with, this one has been upgraded slightly. Inside it its got the following parts:
    • TransGo-2 shift kit - Without being harsh, provides quicker/firmer/cleaner shifts
    • RV-gearset - Provides a 13% lower first and second gear (this will make Canuck's 4.09 axle gears act HIGHER than a 4.56 ~ all the take off of a lower gears, but with the highway cruising of low gears), also gives better take-off and better crawl. Also MUCH stronger than stock, using a 4-planetary steel gear (instead of the stock 3-planetary aluminum unit) - more of the big benifets of this mod will come up later in the build
    • Bolt-in Sprag - strengthens the rear output bearing unit.
    • Full Rebuild kit w/ 5th clutch disc - gives an extra clutch giving unbeatable life, higher power capacity,
    • Kevlar WIDE ban - strength, gripping power, and superior wear
    • 4-2 lever

    One more look of the new trans in waiting.
    [​IMG]

    So what of the old, what did it take to build that trans? Too much. Canuck's old trans was in sorry shape. When torn apart, we quickly discovered why it leaked so badly before. Here's one of the parts that came out
    [​IMG]
    That was supposed to be a full disc.

    In fact, dispite having quite an assortment of upgraded parts and a complete rebuilt kit (with steels) ~ we had to get a whole seperate TF727 to 'borrow' from. Here's what's left of the two trans.
    [​IMG]

    Sometimes a small leak is a sign of problems within. Now, Canuck can be sure of a 100% bomb-proof TF727. Confidence with a little extra ~ and no high-dollar conversions.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2009

Share This Page