hinge suggestions?

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by superfishyall, Feb 5, 2019.


  1. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    I want to re-use this hinge. Either it was off to begin with, or I bent it a little trying to get the old pin out, but as you can see from these pics, the lower part of this hinge is far enough off that the pin won't slide through. Should I:
    a. use a BFH;
    b. drill the lower part out slightly; or
    c. heat it up with a torch and bend it into place?​
    I think the correct answer is c. I have a torch, but I have little experience heating metal up red hot and pounding on it. I'm worried I will heat it up too much or hit it too hard and really muck it up. Thanks.
    2019-02-05 20.09.09.jpg 2019-02-05 20.09.13.jpg
     
  2. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

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    I can't tell from the picture what it's made of and although it looks like cast iron because of the pits, I'll assume they are from rusting and that it's a steel forging. Iff so, and it won't easily break, I'd just put it in a vise, centered on the part you want to bend and with the beginning of that section at the top of the jaw. Then I'd get the largest crescent wrench I had, adjust it to just fit over that part, put the pin through (only) its hole (both to prevent crushing, and as a guide to the amount of movement), and carefully apply pressure in the direction you want it to move.

    Which of the two parts do you think got bent? If the pin is put into the other section, how does it align with this hole? Once installed, which side would be on top? One more consideration; might some of the offset be purposeful,, to keep the pin tight once driven home? How is the set on the other door?
     
  3. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    Thanks Dana. It is an original 1964 hinge, which I think are forged steel. It is pitted from rust. In the picture, the far side is the lower side of the hinge. If I bent a side, it would have been the lower side because I repeatedly heated it and pounded on it to try to get the broken pin out. Your question about it being purposeful is interesting, but I can't tell from the other side without taking that door off, and I'm not going to do that. The pin has slight ridges near the top to hold it in tight in the upper portion of the hinge. For option a, I meant using a BFH to pound the hinge through rather than to pound the hinge into shape. This is what it looked like when I removed the door.
    20190106_175046.jpg
     
  4. Darrel

    Darrel Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    I would use my grinder to determine if it was cast steel. Then I would use my welder to bend it. Then flap discs to make it pretty.
     
  5. RinTX

    RinTX High Wheeler

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    Sure seems to me that it is not off by much at all. I’d try to install it as is - it will make the hinge tighter.
     
  6. shortbus4x4

    shortbus4x4 Farmall Cub

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    Vise and a crescent wrench or BFH would be my first choice. You shouldn't have to smack it much to get the hole to line up. I'm doing the hinges on my drivers Loadstar door which are the same. Good luck.
     
  7. cudakota

    cudakota Farmall Cub

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    I would carefully bend it back in a vise. Gently heat it if it feels like it's not budging.. not red hot, just warm.
     
  8. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    The vise and crescent wrench worked well. It's all back together and painted. I can't get the pin all the way in despite some serious pounding. I don't think it is a true NOS replacement pin for this hinge so it might be as far as it's going to go. I had to shorten it too. Thanks for the tips.
    2019-02-11 20.29.08.jpg
     
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  9. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Glad it worked out.
    When trying to replace something like that pin, and it's sticking, you can coat the surfaces with something like Dykem, or in a pinch, a black Sharpie, then oil them lightly and try fitting the parts. Where the dye got scraped off is where the contact was. Sometimes a round file and lots of light motions, followed by a quick look each time, does wonders.
     
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  10. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    That's a good idea, but it wasn't sticking in one spot. The pin has ridges at the top to secure it into the hinge (picture below is not the same pin but shows similar ridges). It is supposed to fit tight and require a hammer. I just think that because it is not a true NOS part for this hinge, the ridges are a little too high to pound it all the way in. I suppose I could pound it out and file down those ridges, but I think it will be OK.
    rnb-38447_fp.jpg
     
  11. Erik Morton

    Erik Morton High Wheeler

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    It seems like you should be able to press it in the rest of the way. It certainly won't back out after.
     
  12. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    I took it to the same shop that pressed out the old pin and they pressed it the rest of the way at no charge. Now the hard part, getting my wife and son in one place at the same time to help put the door back on.
     
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  13. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    You can do the door yourself,I have,just slide onto the hinge that is already boled to the door frame,I use a jack stand to hold it close to the right higth
     
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  14. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    I'm apparently a lesser man and needed a helper, but we got 'er done! Thanks for the hinge tips. On to the next thing!
     
  15. Erik Morton

    Erik Morton High Wheeler

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    IIRC two milk crates got my door close enough.
     

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