Heat shrink hose clamps

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by Gringo Gomez, Nov 15, 2019.


  1. Gringo Gomez

    Gringo Gomez Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    Has anybody tried anything like this?
    upload_2019-11-15_23-13-49.png
     
  2. mallen

    mallen High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    2,724
    Likes Received:
    497
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Sacramento,California
    Interesting. The question is,how much are they compared with decent worn drive clamp, and can you get enough heat on some hard to reach ones.
     
  3. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    5,007
    Likes Received:
    1,045
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Sunnyvale, Ca.
    I hadn't even seen them, although I've used HS tubing for similar purposes on smaller items. My objection would be that they would be difficult to remove and reuse, as a good hose clamp can be, so would require one more spare part to carry, just-in-case...
     
    scout2000 likes this.
  4. Gringo Gomez

    Gringo Gomez Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    I just discovered these yesterday myself.
    You guys are echoing my own concerns at first glance.
     
  5. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Messages:
    14,513
    Likes Received:
    1,091
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    lima,ohio
    Never heard of it. I dont think id use them after a 3-5$k rebuild.
     
  6. patrick r

    patrick r Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    367
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Zionsville, IN
    There was a thread here showing some of these in use on a sv. The poster was happy with them. They have a nice clean look.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  7. winchested

    winchested High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2016
    Messages:
    2,700
    Likes Received:
    884
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Delhi, ON, Canada
    From experience with those on my 2011 f150 which uses heat compressed rings on the coolant hoses... They are junk. I've already replaced on or two with standard hose clamps.
     
  8. RBS

    RBS Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    97
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Normal, IL
    I wouldn't use them unless you have a distorted fitting where they MIGHT be worth trying. Regular hose clamps are extremely reliable and have been for years, these heat compression types are useful for some special purposes but otherwise they are a solution looking for a problem to solve.
     
    scout2000 likes this.
  9. mongocanfly

    mongocanfly Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2017
    Messages:
    977
    Likes Received:
    464
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Alabama
    Theyve been around for some time...a buddy of mine runs them on all his builds...hes never had a issue with them...downside is that are not reusable...I have a set for mine when get ready to button the engine back up...
    We shall see....its a much cleaner look than worm clamps...and if your like me it seems I'm always cutting myself on the tails of worm clamps when working on something...not a issue with the heat shrink clamps..
    But I will keep a emergency stash of clamps under the seat ...just in case
     
  10. RBS

    RBS Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    97
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Normal, IL
    When I think of these, I think of all of the new and different plumbing pipe materials and fittings over the years that seemed great until they weren't. At least in the vehicle, you will know pretty quickly if one fails and they aren't hidden behind a wall. They do look neat and they are probably more robust than some of the ultra cheap clamps used on a lot of current production vehicles.

    If you want a neat covering for traditional worm drive clamps that will protect you from cutting yourself on the tails, silicone self fusing electrical tape is neat stuff. You will need to cut it with a utility cutter to remove it but it isn't really messy to remove and it is temperature rated for operation at over 350F. It makes a neat conforming cover for a lot of stuff in addition to its design purpose of environmentally sealing high power electrical connections while providing excellent electrical insulation.

    Rodger
     
  11. patrick r

    patrick r Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    367
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Zionsville, IN
    The only advantage of worm drive clamps is availability and you can put them on without removing the hose. There are better options as far as strength and looks. I don’t remember seeing worm drive clamps used from the factory. Must be a reason.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  12. mallen

    mallen High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    2,724
    Likes Received:
    497
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Sacramento,California
    I think you would just carry a few spare worm drive clamps, just like you have to do now and replace it with the shrink clamp later. I'm skeptical of their implication that they are better on things out of round though. Worm drive clamps are pretty flexible.
     
    scout2000 likes this.
  13. mallen

    mallen High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2012
    Messages:
    2,724
    Likes Received:
    497
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Sacramento,California
    Yup. Cost. Its a lot cheaper to make a spring clip style clamp. These are cheaper still. Worm drive clamps are really good though, if of decent quality so you need a really good replacement to make the case to switch.
     
  14. Gringo Gomez

    Gringo Gomez Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    I always seem to develop minor sometimes temporary leaks with worm drive clamps, upper hose at the t-stat housing and continually at heater hose connections. The worm drive tends to gather the hose to a point under the screw rather than compress the hose wall evenly around the fitting. I'm not concerned about looks, this beast isn't pretty from any angle. Since I'm replacing the radiator and draining down the system, I was looking for a product more reliable without shelling out for "racing" style clamps. I stumbled upon these but as mallen remarked it may be hard to apply heat around a fitting for even compression.
     
  15. patrick r

    patrick r Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    367
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Zionsville, IN
    Cost makes good sense.
    They also have to perform for at least the length of warranty. Making spring type a good option if looking for alternatives.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  16. patrick r

    patrick r Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    870
    Likes Received:
    367
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    Zionsville, IN
    I have experienced the same thing. Currently I have doubled up worm drives on my radiator hoses.
    These are some that I would consider as possible alternatives, as well as the heat shrink type. [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  17. Gringo Gomez

    Gringo Gomez Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 7, 2015
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Lawrenceville, NJ
    Yeah, patrick r, the "Tight Seal Bolt Clamp" style is what I was leaning toward as they would seem to offer more evenly applied compression around the fitting.
    Thanks.
     
  18. kevingweq

    kevingweq Y-Block King

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2013
    Messages:
    3,015
    Likes Received:
    645
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Sudbury Mass
    The shrink tube clamps have been around for at least 20 years in the Ag/Construction equipment world , they work very well
    and are a "constant tension" style clamp, Big 3" and up hose connections are where they work very well at controlling cold weather
    static weeping and leaks , My preferred choice on auto/light truck clamps are "liner style" where an unperforated band shields the hose frome damage caused
    by the worm slots, Silicone hoses are very prone to damage from regular worm drives, My emergency kit is a homemade clamptite tool

    piccy of liner clamp
    tmb1_000092.jpg

    clamptite tool
    https://www.garrettwade.com/clamptite-repair-tools-gp.html
     
    scout2000 and Gringo Gomez like this.
  19. Erik VanRenselaar

    Erik VanRenselaar Y-Block King

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2001
    Messages:
    3,249
    Likes Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Petaluma, CA
    ABA are supposed to be one of the best stainless steel worm gear type hose clamp. Non-perforated design and rolled edges are a few notable features.
     
    Gringo Gomez likes this.
  20. Greg R

    Greg R Dreams of Cub Cadets

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2002
    Messages:
    4,842
    Likes Received:
    571
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Lebanon, OR
    Heat shrink clamps are probably great for production; but at our stage we're in maintenance. I don't think something as needful as clamps being a one time use are in my favor. To the vintage vehicle crowd it's more of a sell on looks than function.

    The constant tension shouldn't be used on old hose. The rubber gets a set after run time and it doesn't always get the same compression reusing the clamp which is prone to distortion removing them. The twin rings are pretty good but those screws can get rusty and hard to remove without the clamp bending sideways plus sometimes you have to remove the nut and screw to spread them enough to get past the grooves they make in the rubber. They're a pain on older engines, especially if you lose the nut. Toyota likes them, but I end up going worm drive for no come backs or leaks.

    The best clamps are the T-bolt style. Very smooth, no slots, and even grip. I've used them in hydronic systems and larger hoses on trucks. The smallest they go I believe is 1 3/8" which makes them too large for 5/8" heater hose; but great for radiator hose, especially if the thin wall radiator nipples aren't perfectly round.

    The worm drive style you really have to watch quality, there's some really poorly made ones out there even though they might look robust at first glance. I bought some at an industrial supplier and they looked as good as the Ideal brand ones. They were junk. The drive slots had burrs or stamping flash, the drive was sketchy and some wouldn't turn right under pressure without a drop of oil, and on top of that they dug in the rubber rather crooked under the worm head or didn't go evenly and the finished shape was more of a D than a O such as an oversized clamp would do.

    My lesson learned was go with a brand you know and trust such as Ideal or ABA, but if you don't know look at the fit and finish. Polished or smooth band, chamfered edges, clean smooth or polished worm drive slots, and ease of the screw to turn. In this cost helps, a little more money usually means a better clamp. Another important thing is to match the size. Too long and you have ugly tails ready to snag you. The proper size will have enough band to cover the hose with the right amount of slots that won't embed as much and there shouldn't be excess tail over 1/2" past the screw head. If there is excess because it's all there is, then cut the excess off and make it neat. Personally I despise tails hanging all over the engine bay; it's just sloppy.
     

Share This Page