Having tires cut....does it work?

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by _CJ, Nov 29, 2006.


  1. 76 Terra

    76 Terra Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Messages:
    163
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    The November 2006 issue of Consumer Reports has an article about siping tires. Their research didn't show any improvement and the typical cost (about $60 for a set of four tires) made them recommend people not do it.

    But what the hey, they are your tires, cut them up if you want to.

    TRO
     
  2. corncrasher

    corncrasher Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2001
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Orofino, Idaho- Nampa Idaho
    The only down side about siping is it can cause the tread to chunk up a bit off road in some cases. I have noticed it in places with a lot of small rocks. The absolute best thing you can have for winter driving is common sence which doesn't seem to exist for a lot of people.
     
  3. corncrasher

    corncrasher Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2001
    Messages:
    114
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Orofino, Idaho- Nampa Idaho
    Consumer reports is a joke- there opinion means about as much to me as the neighbors dogs opinion.
     
  4. DavidWTravelallfan

    DavidWTravelallfan High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Messages:
    2,707
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Acworth Georgia
    Studs were legal in MD where i grew up in the 60s-70s, Dad used to put them on the Travelall when it was new..
     
  5. Corndog

    Corndog Binder Driver

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2006
    Messages:
    585
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane Valley, WA
    IIRC, the only way Les Schwab charges for syping is if you bring in used tires. If you get them syped as they install the tires, it's free.
     
  6. CareyWeber

    CareyWeber Diesel Herder / Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2001
    Messages:
    3,814
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Ridgeway, SC
    The reason is they don't like to sype used tire is there can be small rocks in used tires and they will break the corkscrew shaped blade on a syping machine. This is not an issue when syping a tire with a hand held device.

    Tires can be sype all the way across the tread (most syping is on semi truck tires and they are syped all the way across. Pickups/SUV's tipically only get the center syped.

    The trucking industy uses syped tires and they would not do it if it was a waste of money. They earn their keep on tires. ;)

    Syped tire have better traction on ice than unsyped period.

    If you run lots of gravel roads at speed then yes it can cause chunking, but all tires chunk some when run on gravel lots.

    It is getting more and more common to make studded tires illegal. When I was stationed in Anchorage, AK for five years you can see the ruts worn into the pavement by studded tires. The other thing they do is cause more air polution from the pavement they dig up. I think that studs worked much better than bias ply tires, but todays tires are much better that bias ply tires.

    Carey
     
  7. John Neal

    John Neal Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    Messages:
    169
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Brownsville, OR
    The Peterbilt trucks at work used to run virgin tires. Michelin truck tires collect rocks like crazy. We used to lose a lot of tires to what was called "rock drill". The tires got into the tread and would just stay there until they got down to the belts. We switched to the Les Schwab ring treads and we had some of the same problems but not as bad because of a different tread pattern. When we replaced the ring treads about half had rocks through the case and down to the belts.

    Now the point of this story: :)

    After having all of the tires syped we have not lost one tire to rock drilling. The tires are lasting longer and getting better traction in wet weather. I will never put on a set of tires without syping. I have never had one lose chunks or bits of rubber. Those trucks see a lot of miles and syping has proven itself to be very effective.

    If done properly and not cut to the outside of the tire you can't go wrong even if you never see ice or off road.
     
  8. Ben Perkins

    Ben Perkins Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2005
    Messages:
    258
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Orofino, ID
    I won't argue that studded tires damage roadways, it is clearly noted. However each area has it's own challenges. My area has extreme grades and other hazards that, say the mid west doesn't. I do have studded tires on my wifes, and my teenage childrens vehicles. My wife works in the health care field and is often called at any hour. My teenagers, whom I dearly love, don't have the common sense that a 30-40 year old adult has. I will gladly pay taxes to repair these roadways in order to provide the maximum safety for my loved ones. I also own a set of the only practical alternative to studs, and I am not as confident in them as the proven traction and safety of studded tires. Of course chains are the final traction answer, but they are not practical at all times. I also had those studded tires siped as well.
     
  9. jbgriggs

    jbgriggs Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2005
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Location:
    Northern BC
    I growed up with with throwing the studs on every winter, and in northeast Washington state you needed all the traction you could get to get around in the winter. Lately I've experemented with Toyo Observes, which in reality is a snow tread design utilizing a kinda zig zag syping. They work super except for warm ice. That, so far is the only road condition that I would rather studs.

    On the other hand, years ago we bought retread studded tires and what a worthless POS they turned out to be. Kinda like walkin outside in your slippers. :eek: My theory is that the rubber compound had to be to hard for the retreading to make the tire worth anything in the snow.

    I make my living in the trucking industry. Different areas seem to value syping more than others. Up here I run off-road log truck and only a couple of outfits up here are "trying" out syping. Down in NE Washington it was more standard operating procedure.
     
  10. IHWILD

    IHWILD High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2002
    Messages:
    1,135
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    Location:
    Windham, ME
    Ok other then the pros and cons of syping.

    What kind of tires can be syped? I have BFG AT's I didnt think about going with the MT's due to always hearing about poor wet weather abilities with mud tires as I tend to do more driving on the street at the moment but do venture off road at times. along with multiple 200+ mile trips. I grew up in the snow and definetly have the experience of driving in just about all types I can get ahold of on the northeast states. So I have always run a M&S rated tire and my dad alway plowed with just BFG All seasons or rugged trail tires with barely a probelm until the snow was hire then the sides of the truck. No chains or anything. I really like the goodyear tires on the wife's interpid I think they are called tripletread advantage or something like that.. worked really good last winter.

    Rich
     
  11. Redbeard

    Redbeard Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    I had both my BFG MT on my scout and my who-knows-what-type tires on my DD syped, so, both big lug and teeny tiny 2wd car tires in my expreience.
     
  12. _CJ

    _CJ Guest

    Update: I finally got the Scout into the garage last night and went to work with a hardware knife. Took me about two hours, while talking on the phone, drinking beer, etc. On the last tire it was getting cold, so I pulled out the turbo heater and aimed it at the front side of the tire while I worked on the back. It didn't take long to realize I should have done this with every tire. The tires took the heat and made the cutting go much faster and easier. I plan to take a picture of the tires and the tool of choice in a few days and post in a new thread. Doesn't look like the weather is going to give me a chance to test the performance until next week.
     

Share This Page