Growing rust issues

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by cws_scoutII, Sep 30, 2020.


  1. cws_scoutII

    cws_scoutII Farmall Cub

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    So I've got some rust in my truck that I want to address and there are two areas that I am going to start with. First is the floor panels under the driver and passenger side. The paint is bubbling to varying degrees on both side and medium severity rust has developed. The under side of the floor panels has been bed lined by the PO and they still feel solid. I know the only true fix is cut em out an weld new panels in but they don't seem to be weak enough to justify that yet. How would grinding down to bare metal and then treating with Rust Bullet and then priming/painting work?

    IMG_0220.JPG IMG_0219.JPG IMG_0216.JPG IMG_0214.JPG

    The other area is the bed. It was lined by the PO and the coating is now peeling and minor surface rust is bubbling up. My plan is to remove the old bed liner, coat with rust bullet then re-apply new liner. I've read removing liner is a serious pain so curious if anyone has tips for that other than heat, chemicals, grinders and elbow grease.
     
  2. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

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    You have your work cut out for you, but all is not lost. Remove the rust, mechanically or chemically and spray it with a good epoxy primer. I really like Southern Polyurethanes, but there are many others that work equally well. Epoxy primer does a great job of sealing metal from oxidation and provides a great base for paint. Your other options include cutting out the rusted metal and welding in new.
    Good luck, Perdido
     
  3. robs

    robs Farmall Cub

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    The biggest mistake I made when starting on mine was assuming problem areas are just what you can see.
    If I had to do it over again i would have media blasted the entire Scout first. Trust me you will find more than what you listed. It will save you a lot of time and money in the long run.
    And then apply some form of base as suggested above.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2020
    TravelerMan79 likes this.
  4. Don B

    Don B Binder Driver

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    The problem isn’t what you see but all the hidden crap. Seam areas are always a problem. I would remove all that you can see (I like a a twisted wire wheel on a angle grinder but BE CAREFUL as it can get away from you quickly..read all safety directives..really) once de-rusted I like to use Ospho or similar. For seamed areas or heavy rusted areas try using a mat like good paper towel and then covering with plastic wrap to keep it wetter. This should derust the problem areas. Re-apply if required.

    Rust uck!
     
    TravelerMan79 and robs like this.
  5. TravelerMan79

    TravelerMan79 Farmall Cub

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    Agree with above. My floors looked not too bad from underneath because they were rust proofed, but after removing all the interior carpet etc it was a different story. I just went through the same thing on my 08 Acura MDX. Had a hole in the PS rear quarter/ wheel arch just behind the rear door. Thought it would just be a simple patch. Wrong! After removing the inner wheel well plastic and rocker cover, there was more rust/holes and now it has turned into a $hitshow. Probably will sell it after patch things up as I know the rust will return before the spring. Unless you remove all rusted metal and get to clean metal, the rust WILL return. A couple of pics...
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    0460163F-9A6F-4C74-A054-8118135CACD0.jpeg 836F217E-AA7A-472D-A778-7823199B670B.jpeg
     

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