First year for the 392?

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by Douchal, Oct 3, 2015.


  1. Douchal

    Douchal Farmall Cub

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    Hi guys!

    Does anyone know the first year that the 392 was offered from the factory?

    Thanks.

    Doug
     
  2. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    In light trucks, 1969, when the D-Line debuted. Development of the engine was completed in 1965... about six years late... and it was soon to be an option in the medium duties (don't have that date for sure). Development started at the same time as the V-266, V-304 and V-345 but the large bores made it a bit more tricky to do. The 4-196, however, appeared in Scouts starting in '66, which was an offshoot of the V-392. Going through the MTC meeting minutes from the late '50s and '60s indicated how badly IH wanted both the V-392 and the 4-196 but they document an endless series of delays and problems. They got 'er done, though!
     
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  3. Douchal

    Douchal Farmall Cub

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    Awesome info.

    Thanks!!
     
  4. Tom Mandera

    Tom Mandera Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    I thought the 392 was available circa 1966.

    You can find contour pistons and matching heads, because the 392 was released not long before the switch to flat-top "E" series engines.

    AFAIK the 266 wasn't offered with flat-top pistons, so it died before then.

    The question may have been "was available from the factory in a light line" and perhaps the answer is correct, but I thought the ENGINE was available from the factory in other things before 1969.

    I could very well be mistaken. ;)
     
  5. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    Right. And my first line above said just that. It was available in 1966 but not in light trucks.
     
  6. Tom Mandera

    Tom Mandera Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    Sorry, I misread it.

    I thought "offered in 1969, it was 6 years late" :D

    More like - it was 6 years late, and then another 3 years before it was offered in the light line.
     
  7. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    Just a little 392 dyslexia is all ( ;< ).
     
  8. Dennis Bernth

    Dennis Bernth Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I was told something today by the guy who delivered my wife's new washer. He apparently grew up in Fort Wayne, and had family that worked for IH and other associated suppliers. He said that he remembered as a kid that IH was experimenting with a ceramic engine block. He said the draw was that it could be molten cast to size, eliminating most machining, and that it should be very durable. He said that the guy that lived across the street from them actually drove an IH home that had a prototype ceramic engine in it, he walked over with his dad to look at the engine. He said the reason he heard that it didn't work out was that it retained too much heat and ran way too hot. Dunno if this was IH doing the 'sperimentin, or some supplier, and just thought I'd post it up here to see if any of that came up in your research. I am allowing .02 for what this might be worth ;)
     
  9. Gus Erickson

    Gus Erickson Farmall Cub

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    Very cool Dennis!
     
  10. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    Well, I've heard about a lot of experiments they ran but not a fully ceramic block. I know a retired engineer at the Indy Engine Plant to ask and will the next time I talk to him. It wouldn't surprise me based on the stuff I do know about. They fooled around with aluminum a fair bit, including some all aluminum SV engines and the legendary "Fireball" combustion chamber. Thing is, by the time the Scout II was around, IH had seen the move to diesels in the medium trucks and was spending most of their whiz bang creativity there. The light trucks were on the chopping block for a long while before they finally did get the chop in '75, so development of the light gas engines, or the development of more modern, emissions friendly ones (of which IH was fully capable) wasn't a high priority compared to the diesels. Remember, the 6.9L an DT466s came from this general timeframe, along with some other diesels IH spent a lot of development time on. One that was developed at the same time as the 6.9L but didn't appear was the DV-345... a diesel converted 345.

    It's interesting to note that had the '81 model year Scout debuted, and the development was in a very complete state, one (for sure) or two (likely) of the familiar IH gas engines were to be gone from the lineup. By the next year, or two, probably all of them would have been gone and all the light duty engines would have come from outside the engine plant. We found two existing prototype Scouts still powered with test engines from other manufacturers and one that once had been. As it was, the SV gas engines and fours didn't last much past the breakup of IH as the medium duty industry went diesel. We have the engine production records from the Indy Engine Plant and the production of gas engines fell to next to nothing after the Scout died, barely over a thousand SV8s, and after '85 we are talking barely over a hundred engines until the last batch in '88. It was extremely low after '79 and most of the '80s produced were Nissan diesel powered.
     
  11. Dennis Bernth

    Dennis Bernth Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    I remember hearing that the Slant Six was going to be the 'base' engine I thought in 82, but you're the authority on that. I suspect that if that happened, it would just make sense to make everything Mopar and go with the LA engine also, but we all know how IH did things, not the way normal people think all the time.
     

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