FEB engine questions

Discussion in 'Triple Diamond Trucks' started by Colin Rush, Sep 29, 2004.


  1. AUSSIE RD-192

    AUSSIE RD-192 Farmall Cub

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    THIS IS VERY INTERESTING, I have never seen one but in the 1951 Motors Truck & tractor Repair Manual it gives this info
    Bore 5"
    Stroke 5 1/2"
    Wet sleeves
    648 ci
    Compression 4.40
    Over head valve
    Torque 460 @ 100rpm
    HP 140@2100rpm
    Crankpin 2.750"
    Main 3.246"
    Firing order 153624
    Said that it was IHC own engine made from 1936 to 1943

    I have a recent photo of one and it looks just like the photo drawings that have been posted, The distributor is on the front RH side of the block, I have asked for the numbers on it and if its for sale, if it is I will put it in a 1938 McCormick-Deering WK-40 tractor. Never heard or seen of one in Australia and bearings are not listed in my copy of 1956 Fedrel-Mogal catalog.

    Thanks from Jake.
     
  2. IHWillys

    IHWillys Farmall Cub

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    "cross-flow" head.



    "uni-flow" head.



    Hemi, wedge, pent-roof, etc refer to combustion chamber, not port, configuration.

    Ken
     
  3. AUSSIE RD-192

    AUSSIE RD-192 Farmall Cub

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    It's not a cross flow head, plugs are on the LH side and the inlet and exhaust are on the RH side. Plug wires cross over from RH side over rocker cover to LH side. The head is one casting, not two. Allso looks like it has a seven bearing crank.

    Thanks from Jake.
     
  4. snowjob

    snowjob Farmall Cub

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    Hello out there,
    I thought I'd re-check this post because I'm interested in Hall-Scott engine information. Info is practically non-existant on the web. I haven't been able to find any relationship between International and Hall-Scott in the 40's or 50's. Hall-Scott made a new design in the 50's which mainly went into buses. I personally don't think any gas engine compares to Hall-Scott truck engine power. The 400 series had to have been the biggest gas engine ever put into a truck. Hall-Scott seems to be a forgotten name, but if you ever hear one idling or comming down the road, I doubt you will forget it.
    Greg
     
  5. Tom Jamison

    Tom Jamison Farmall Cub

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    Hi I new here, but I ran a Hall Scott 190 horizonal motor (779 C.I. ) in a ACF Brill bus for thirty five years, F.M.C.A.As far as I know all Hall Scotts had overhead cams ,hemi heads,and twin plugs.I might be able to dig up some stuff but I do not even know where to start .Very interesting Tom Jamison
     
  6. snowjob

    snowjob Farmall Cub

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    From all the information I can find about Hall-Scott which isn't much, Hall-Scott didn't make many variations of engines in the 30's or 40's. They made a marine engine in 1930 called the Invader which was very advanced for its time. They designed everything until about 1955 off that engine. In 1955 they built a bus engine that was new. It was the only other sucessful design Hall-Scott built. The Continental R6602 engine may have had its roots in the FEB, sounds more similar. The R6602 was built in quantity in the 50's maybe earlier. International had it in their large military trucks back then.
     
  7. Colin Rush

    Colin Rush Man of Voive Staff Member Moderator

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    FEB engine specs

    Here is some information I culled from a wartime edition of National Service Data. These are the engine specifications and tune-up information for the FEB-648 engine.

    Model: FEB
    Year: 1936-1942
    Number of Cylinders/Valve Arrangement: 6-I
    Bore & Stroke: 5x5.5"
    Displacement: 648 CID
    Compression Ratio: 4.4:1
    Taxable HP: 60.0 HP
    Brake Horsepower: 140 HP@2100 RPM
    Maximum Torque: 460 Ft-Lbs@1000 RPM
    Oil Capacity: 22 Quarts
    Firing Order: 153624
    Spark Plug Gap: 0.028"-0.032"
    Breaker Gap: 0.018"-0.024"
    Cam Angle: 35 Degrees
    Timing Mark Location: Flywheel
    Timing Cylinder: #1
    Spark Timing: 5 Degrees Before TDC
    Intake Tappet Clearance, Hot: 0.011"
    Exhaust Tappet Clearance, Hot: 0.013"
    Intake Tappet Clearance for Timing: 0.011"
    Exhaust Tappet Clearance for Timing: 0.013"
    Battery Terminal Grounded: Positive (+)
    Intake Valve Stem Clearance: 0.0015"-0.0025"
    Exhaust Valve Stem Clearance: 0.002"-0.004"
    Tappet Guide Clearance: 0.001"-0.003"
    Valve Spring Free Length: 2 11/16"
    Valve Spring Pressure Test: 85.5 Lbs@1 15/16" Compressed Length
    Valve Seat Angle: 45 Degrees
    Maximum Valve Seat Runout: 0.0005"
    Piston Skirt Clearance @ Top: 0.005"
    Piston Skirt Clearance @ Bottom: 0.005"
    Fitting Pistons with Shim and Spring Scale Shim Thickness: 0.005"
    Fitting Pistons with Shim and Spring Scale Pull Force: 5 Lbs to 12 Lbs
    Compression Ring End Gap: 0.015"-0.020"
    Oil Ring End Gap: 0.015"-0.020"
    Ring-to-Groove Clearance, Top Ring: 0.015"-0.003"
    Ring-to-Groove Clearance, Second Ring: 0.002"-0.0035"
    Ring-to-Groove Clearance, Third Ring: 0.002"-0.0035"
    Ring-to-Groove Clearance, Oil Ring: 0.0015"-0.0035"
    Camshaft #1 Journal Diameter: 2.745"
    Camshaft #2 Journal Diameter: 2.558"
    Camshaft #3 Journal Diameter: 2.495"
    Camshaft #4 Journal Diameter: 2.058"
    Camshaft Journal Clearance: 0.002"-0.0035"
    Connecting Rod Journal Diameter: 2.749"-2.750"
    Connecting Rod Journal Clearance: 0.0025"-0.0045"
    Connecting Rod Bearing Bolt Torque: 60 Ft-Lbs
    Crankshaft Main Bearing Journal Diameter: 3.245"-3.246"
    Crankshaft Main Bearing Journal Clearance: 0.003"-0.005"
    Crankshaft Main Bearing Bolt Torque: 75-85 Ft-Lbs for 1/2" & 9/16" bolts, 90-100 Ft-Lbs for 5/8" bolts
    Thrust Bearing Location: Not Applicable
    Crankshaft Endplay: 0.0035"-0.0075"
    Rocker Arm Bushing Diameter: 0.875"-0.876"
    Rocker Arm End Radius: 0.485"-0.515"
    Maximum Rocker Arm Material Removal: 0.010"
    Maximum Cylinder Bore Runout: 0.0005"
    Maximum Crankshaft Journal Taper (Mains & Rods): 0.003"
    Intake Opens: 10 Degrees After TDC
    Exhaust Closes: 10 Degrees After TDC
    Temperature for Fitting Pistons to Block: 70 Degrees F
    Crankshaft-to-Vibration Damper Clearance: 0.0002"-0.0005"
    Flywheel Clutch Bell Housing Runout: 0.000"-005"
    Fan Belt Tension (Checked at Midpoint Between Water Pump and Generator): 1/2" Slack

    Note that the years listed (1936-1942) were taken from a book that only covered those years. The FEB was made earlier than 1936, but the only place I have seen any information listing production is in Crismon's, and that is spotty. Binder Books has absolutely no information on this engine, and calls to the Wisconsin Historical Archive were fruitless, so as far as I know this is the only info on this engine that has survived, unless a reader of this post actually has some. In that case, please share with the rest of us.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2009
  8. Colin Rush

    Colin Rush Man of Voive Staff Member Moderator

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    Fifteen years have elapsed since I originally started this thread. I have started a new thread where I will post information on this engine and is related engines HERE. I ask that any further questions be posted there, not here.
     

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