Cheap Snorkel Build for Scout II

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by cornfedih, Jan 2, 2006.

  1. cornfedih

    cornfedih Binder Driver

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    I have always loved the way the arb safari snorkels looked but just never could part with the amount of money they want for one. So i went on a mission to build a snorkel for my trail rig. After I completed mine, several people asked me about how i built my snorkel and what materials were used. while its not the prettiest version out there, its extremely functional and very cheap. The only major downside is, it requires cutting a 4" hole in that precious front fender of yours.

    I run alot of water and mud so an enclosed filter element was a must for me. I chose to use the Scout II breather and filter element. That way if i suck the filter full of mud or water, i have plenty of spares handy.

    here is a list of parts that i used:
    1- rubber piece from gmc truck that connects the aircleaner to the firewall
    1- 8'x3" schedule 40 pvc sewer pipe
    1- 4" to 3" rubber reducer for sewer pipe
    2- pvc 90 degree elbows
    2-pvc 45 degree elbows
    plumbers strap or aluminum scraps to secure the snorkel
    3" or 4" holesaw
    scrap grille material (optional)
    radiator petcock
    pvc cleaner and cement


    To start i cut the scout air horn down to approx. 2" in length. then i robbed the rubber piece off of an 89 gmc 1 ton dually with a 454 that connects the air cleaner to the firewall. then i trimmed the rubber piece from the gmc to fit the contour of the scout air cleaner and used sheetmetal screws to screw it into the remaining 2" air horn on the scout air cleaner. next i used liberal amounts of silicone to seal up any gaps. that completes the air cleaner assembly.[​IMG] [​IMG]

    Since mine was a trail rig with rusty fenders, the hole in the fender wasnt an issue for me. I used a 3.5" holesaw (i think..its the one for a scout 800 speedometer) to cut the initial hole thru the outer and inner fenders. Then i enlarged the outer hole to allow the 90 degree elbow to sit flat against the body. the hole ended up being kind of egg shaped. i wanted my snorkel to have a low point other than the carb so i angled the pvc from the carb down toward the fender. that way i can simply put a small radiator petcock in the 90 on the outside of the fender to use as a low point drain in the unlikely event that my snorkel gets water in it. my hole in the fender was 5.25" down from the top of the inner fender and 15" back from the rear of the core support.[​IMG]

    Use the 4" to 3" rubber sewer pipe reducer to attach the air cleaner to the pvc pipe going thru the fender. this piece of pipe was approx 14" long on mine and i chose not to glue the joint inside the inner fender between the 14" piece and the 90. this makes it much easier to service and clean if needed. naturally the 90 goes on the outside of the fender. it attaches to the 25" piece that goes up along the fender toward the windshield frame. next put a 45 on it with an 18" long piece in the other end and adjust it so it fits snug against the windshield frame. then put another 45 on top of that piece and add your final 90 up top. i used the 90 that goes over the pipe on one end and inside a fitting on the other end to connect the 45 and 90 together. also i added a piece of grille material to the end to keep out the big chunks. mine was made from a lower valance off of a new New Holland tractor, but you could use anything handy. door speaker grilles from a late model gm tahoe, truck or car make good ones too. they are metal so they can be easily cut to shape with tabs folded inside the 90 for a press-in fit.[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    i have seen air cleaner assemblies from late model jeeps used that look very clean when finished. i didnt have one handy, so i used what i had laying around.

    hopefully this helps those of you who might be able to use a snorkel, but cant afford the $3-600 it takes to buy one. i have beaten this thing off of trees, trucks, rocks, and all sorts of stuff and havent damaged it yet. the best part is, if you do damage it...its pennies to fix it.


    And the finished product...[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2006
  2. John Donnelly

    John Donnelly Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    Submitted for the BB e-newsletter!!!!

    Excellent!

    -John
     
  3. cornfedih

    cornfedih Binder Driver

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    sweet..who knew redneck tech could be widely useful, lol :D
     
  4. scoutman800

    scoutman800 Y-Block King

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    i like it, i like it! cheap redneck is cool. i saw a good one some guy did on a broncoII, but his tubing was bright green. not too good to look at. yours looks great!
     
  5. Derek

    Derek Farmall Cub

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    Great write-up! Was their any noticeable difference in power with the snorkel installed? Like a cold air setup is supposed to provide?
    Also, are you using the heep grab bar on your passenger door frame? Good location regardless.
     
  6. cornfedih

    cornfedih Binder Driver

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    its a 304 t-18 combo (was 727). with it bogged down in mud most of its life i havent noticed any real gain in power...but thats to be expected since a cold air or even ram air type setup is really only beneficial at higher speeds. 90% of the time this scout is moving the ambient temperature is over 90 degrees so i cant see that being a benefit with this particular scout.

    hehe good eye on the heep grab bar tho :D
     
  7. Leman

    Leman Binder Driver

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    I cant wait to start on mine, now that i got it running good and constant. ill probaly spray it w/ the bedliner in the can at wally world... ( with good prep i think its as good as the others). give it a tougher plastic look.
     
  8. shawn davis

    shawn davis Binder Driver

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    i like that custom roll bar setup.
     
  9. binderbart

    binderbart High Wheeler

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    I ran mine on my trail scout similiar to what you did, only I stopped once I got to the fender well, I'm drawing my air from inside of the fender well, I can only go so deep, but that is okay, I don't want to go any deeper than it is. great write up.
     
  10. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

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    when i 1st looked at it i thought?is that a welder?lol,nice job!jeff :D :cool:
     
  11. MikeInMobile

    MikeInMobile High Wheeler

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    Great job! Looks good!
     
  12. GaryB

    GaryB High Wheeler

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    Is that your Sky Hook work truck in the back ground? :eek:
     

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