Canister Type Oil Filters

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by kc5kri, Oct 7, 2018.


  1. kc5kri

    kc5kri Farmall Cub

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    What's the secret to getting these canister, outer shells, back on without leaking? '63 Scout 80: I cleaned out the old gasket, used the smaller of the two gaskets that came with the new filter (fit in the groove), spun the shell to seat it... and it is leaking. Before & After Pics below. What's the secret trick? Resized_20181005_175503_2634.jpeg Resized_20180904_144043_2791.jpeg
     
  2. winchested

    winchested High Wheeler

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    Not much help here but you can upgrade to the later spin on style.
     
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  3. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Like stated trash can and get a spin on adapter. WHY have a canister ?
     
  4. stroker3

    stroker3 Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    Probably just as easy to do as mentioned.
    Sounds like you're doing everything right but if you prefer to keep things stock and you've only tried once, loosen it slightly, wiggle it then spin the canister back and forth a 1/4 turn or so a few more times again and tighten it real good.
    Only other things I can think of is the obvious..........did you put some oil on the new gasket? ......Is the gasket slightly defective? ( small nick/cut/ slightly misshaped somewhere etc.) ...for some reason is the groove not as true or clean as it seems....does the canister edge have a deformity/ nick/ ding/tiny crack in it somewhere. Another wild guess would be the washer at the bolt head is slightly thinner or compressed more than it should be and the bolt bottoms out just shy of were it should be??? FWIW if it's only seeping a little, obvious it's not perfect and 'should' be corrected but I wouldn't lose any sleep over it. Not that unusual to see spin-ons doing the same at times.
     
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  5. Brokegunner

    Brokegunner Farmall Cub

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    I have changed mine twice now and both times it sealed great, so all I can say is don't give up. There must be something that got stuck in the o-ring groove or maybe it's damaged?

    Mine looked like it was 50 years old when I changed it the first time.[​IMG]

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
     
  6. kc5kri

    kc5kri Farmall Cub

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    weather finally cleared up so I could take the filter back off... turns out I didn't get all of the old gasket (or whatever the previous owner used) out of the groove; almost same color as the bare metal. small screw driver tip and small steel brush wasn't enough; ended up using the sharp tip of a center punch & rubber mallet to get through that thing. Thank you for all your help and encouragement!
     
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  7. George Womack

    George Womack Y-Block King

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    I was just about to say just that--it is often hard to see that the old gasket is still there, and you need to dig it out. You figured it out before I answered. There is nothing wrong with the canister type filters; they are just a bit more work to remove/install.
    You probably already know this, but the filter is WIX 51156, NAPA 1156, or Carquest 85156.



    .
     
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  8. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    The main downside I see with canisters is that you only have a small choice of filters brand and qualities. You cannot choose a premium, high efficiency filter, for example.

    The 51156 canister element, for example, is only a 25 micron filter nominal as rated by Wix. Wix is one of the better companies but that "nominal" rating is a real bait and switch. That rating has really fallen out of favor because it's so misleading (like the old Brake HP ratings pre-'72). The industry definition of nominal is that the filter will catch a percentage of particles at that size. The manufacturer can choose what percentage from 50% to 95% and unless they list the percentage, i.e. "25 um (um is the symbol for micron) at X percent" you don't know if it's a good filter or not. 25 um @ 95% is a good filter, not great but good (considering you can get 18 um at 98.7%, but I digress). 25 um at 75% is poor and there are worse than that. There are some filters out there that were saying something like "20 micron nominal" but the actual spec was "20 micron at 51 percent" which is abysmal.

    The absolute rating is better, which is the particle size captured at 98.7%. Some of the premium spin ons (synthetic media) are in the 18-20 um absolute and that's a SIGNIFICANT improvement over a "25 um nominal" filter.

    IMO, an old school "metal monster," carbureted, oil killing engine can really benefit from a high efficiency filter. Modern engines, without flat tappets, bushed rocker arms, many without timing chains or gears, etc. generate very few wear metals in normal operation. An old school engine by comparison is a metal contaminant "factory." Some of the particle analysis I have seen recently show a modern engine generating about 10% of the wear metals of an old school engine (there are better and worse in both categories and I have not made a scientific study). Particle contamination of the oil is one of the two main reasons you change the oil. When the levels increase above a certain threshold, wear is increased by virtue of the contamination alone. The oil itself might be in fine shape, just too dirty.

    The other thing that happens with an old school carbureted engine is degradation of the oil via combustion byproducts and fuel contamination. Fuel metering in a carbureted engine is inefficient at best and abysmal at worst, so there is always a lot of raw fuel, blowby and carbon washing down the cylinder walls and engine up in the crankcase oil. An efficient oil filter can help with the carbon load by catching the chunks in sizes to the level of it's efficiency.

    Anyway, sorry for the diatribe, but I thing going to a spin on and then using a premium high efficiency filter is the way to go on any older engine.
     
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  9. RinTX

    RinTX High Wheeler

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    Where do I find info on filter efficiency ratings that you mention? Is it on the box and I’ve just never noticed?
     
  10. BinderBookie

    BinderBookie High Wheeler

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    Some filters have it on the box. Many of the premium filters advertise properly on the box. Others don't. With a specific product name, you can often find it on the company website or get it via a tech inquiry or even googling. Virtually all of the premium filters I have looked at it was relatively easy to get their number. All were generally in the same ballpark.

    The oil filter nobody wants you to look at is the synthetic media Fram Ultra. Very high efficiency, superb construction, available everywhere and at a reasonable price. It's better than some of the boutique filters!

    Here's a link to an educational article that will help: http://www.trailerlife.com/tech/diy/what-you-need-to-know-about-engine-oil-filters/
     
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