Biodiesel Upgrade - Lessons Learned

Discussion in 'The BioDiesel Plant' started by cv_scout, Oct 20, 2012.


  1. cv_scout

    cv_scout Farmall Cub

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    Hi all-

    Here is my write-up on the conversion to run B99 in the SD33T. Any advice and/or comments are always appreciated. Hopefully this will help others to make the transition.

    I decided to upgrade and address the entire system from the tank to the injector pump since it was very old and some POs had attempted to make some dodgy modifications.

    Total cost: less than $200

    Here are the things I did; I will explain more in detail with pics and costs below:

    1) Cleaned the fuel tank.
    2) Cleaned and stripped the filler neck (most important if galvanized).
    3) Cleaned and calibrated the fuel sender.
    4) Replaced all the hoses between the tank, lift pump, filter, and injector pump.
    5) Replaced all the hardware (clamps, etc) with stainless steel.
    6) Replaced the stock primer pump with an injector pump-mounted BOSCH pump.
    7) Replaced the secret banjo-bolt filter on the lift pump block.
    8) Drove the scout about 1000 miles (+/-30 hrs on the motor) just to verify all the modifications were intact.

    First, here is a picture of the original setup on the engine:

    [​IMG]

    Fuel tank-
    I wasn't sure whether my tank was galvanized or not and the previous owner said it was cleaned at some time. In any case, i decided to drop it and have a look for myself. I also suspected that there was a clogged fuel pickup sock somewhere which was causing some fuel starvation. Here is what I found:

    [​IMG]

    The tank was in pretty good shape but the all of the hoses were standard grade which meant they would eventually fail under biodiesel use. The inner lining is a bit more robust, but look what happens when a bit of the bio gets on the hose:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I pulled the sender out and low and behold, the clogged sock:

    [​IMG]

    I installed an inline prefilter in the engine compartment so no need for this little gem. I sent the tank to a local radiator guy and he cleaned and painted (exterior) of both the filler tube and tank. This cost $80 but I thought that was reasonable considering the amount of work invoved for the filler tube alone. The tank turned out not to be galvanized :) but the filler tube was. :(

    I replaced all the hoses with biodiesel compatible ones. "Parker Super-flex" for the 5/16" and "Gates Barricade" for the 1/2". The 5/16" was $2.60/foot from WVO Designs and I purchased 4 feet. The 1/2" was $2.70/foot from Napa Auto and I purchased 1 foot. The lined stainless steel clamps were $2.07 from Napa Auto and I purchased four of them (I cannot find my receipt for a part number though).

    The clamps used for the hoses at the 5/16" air brake line to the 5/16" bio hose were stainless steel fuel injection clamps and cost about a dollar each. I would recommend not using these and spend a little more money to get quality ones. You can usually find them at a marine supply store for about $1.85 each. Here is a picture of the two grades, the one on the left is the cheap one, and the one on the right is the good one:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    See how the higher quality one retains its shape better? This is essential to keep air out of the system. I used ten 5/16" clamps for the entire job.

    I also experimented with using a length of HDPE plastic tube to connect the filler tube to the tank but it just wasn't flexible enough to install. Here is the initial install after I got the cleaned tank back:

    [​IMG]

    So I ended up just using the existing hose and clamps from before and I will eventually replace with silicon hose (when the price drops). The other issue I ran into during installation was the routing of the hoses. There is a hem seam under the body that will cut into the return line hose if routed directly above the filler hose and tank. Here is the final re-routed and configured setup at the tank:

    [​IMG]

    The sending unit was fairly new and so I cleaned, calibrated, and reinstalled (without the sock).

    Primary Hoses-
    The hoses between the lift pump/filter and filter/IP were original, old, and not bio-compliant so they needed replacing. Not to mention that the PO hacked into one in an attempt to install a fuel heater:

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I researched options for these quite a bit and decided to try to re-use the "non-reusable" fittings on the ends. These hoses do not see much pressure and so I cut one of the crimped fittings apart to see if it could be used with hose and clamps. It turns out that if you carefully cut the outer crimp ring with a dremel or such you can get a useable fitting. Here is the fitting with its banjo bolt and copper washers:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    All of the fittings were cut, sorted, and cleaned:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    I returned all of the fittings to their original locations for good practice and replaced the copper crush washers with aluminum ones. The aluminum ones do not react with the biodiesel. I purchased a ten pack of 14mm washers for $4.95 from Summit Racing. These are also available in Viton and both are available at your local diesel repair shop.

    The fitting end slips into a 3/8" hose. I puchased 3 feet of "Parker Super-flex" for $2.75/foot from WVO Designs. The clamps I used were high grade stainless steel fuel injection line clamps made by ABA and cost about $1.85 a piece and I used four total. Here is the completed hose asssemby:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    To eliminate the problematic firewall primer pump, I purchased a BOSCH filter for ~$20 based on write-ups on the forum (http://www.binderplanet.com/forums/showthread.php?t=101829). I wanted to simplify the installation and the additional highly specialized hydraulic hose between the primer and lift pumps.

    I should note that I also replaced the 5/16" air brake tubing fuel lines. They were in good shape, but I figured why not. The best price I found was .41 cents per foot at Ryder online. They also had additional colors for more money. I ended up ordering two colors but they were out of some of them so I stuck to plain black for both the supply and return lines. The original two colored lines were great for visual inspection and knowing which lines were which but I just made sure that the tube labeling read in the direction of the fuel flow and so there are now no issues identifying the return and supply lines. I purchased 37 feet which was more than enough and only because I had to make the minimum order.

    The connection at the lift pump was the most problematic because I needed a 5/16" air brake line to meet up with the special filter banjo-bolt and a 37 degree flare fitting. I replaced the flare fitting with a 5/16" hose barb banjo fitting and used a section of 5/16" Parker hose and clamps to connect it. The fitting was $9.50 at a local diesel shop and they threw in two viton sealing washers. Here is the makeup:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The filter that goes in the banjo bolt at the bottom of the lift pump was full of crap and damaged:

    [​IMG]

    I picked one up at a local diesel shop for around $6. Here is a comparison of the two and a part number:

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    Here is a picture of the final assembly at the filter:

    [​IMG]

    You can see the in-line initial filter I installed to replace the sock in the fuel tank. This is much easier to inspect and replace and helps to protect the main filter. The part number is Baldwin BF7725 and costs around $3-$4.

    Give me a shout if anyone has any questions or needs more specific information.

    Cheers,
    Casey
     
  2. SlowBurn

    SlowBurn Farmall Cub

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    This thread is very helpful to a Scout owner wanting to convert my fuel system to B100 bio-diesel...thanks for the thoroughness. A question I have is the Diesel stores that you reference getting some of the parts from...any store in particular? The diesel truck shop I have near me dose not deal in retail. If you have already addressed this question, I must have missed it. Thanks.
     
  3. q_mech

    q_mech Farmall Cub

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    This is an outstanding post! Thank you for your level of detail and all the documentation.
     
  4. cv_scout

    cv_scout Farmall Cub

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    Thanks all-

    The specific diesel shop I went to was Diamond Diesel in Oakland, CA.

    You can get the banjo bolt filter here. Not sure what the shipping is, though.

    The gates hose can be purchased at Napa.

    The parker hose can be purchased online, but will need to be searched. I got it from WVO Designs.

    Cheers,
    Casey
     
  5. q_mech

    q_mech Farmall Cub

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    Do you happen to have a part number for that banjo bolt you scored at the lift pump connection? The $9.50 one?
     
  6. cv_scout

    cv_scout Farmall Cub

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    q_mech-

    The only thing I have on the receipt is "12001/9 Fitting". The part looked pretty generic and didn't have a number or brand stamped on it.

    This looks very similar: http://fostertr.nextmp.net/14mm-banjo-fitting-seals-clamp.html

    Just verify that your banjo bolt is indeed 14 mm dia, I cannot remember off the top of my head.

    BTW - is q_mech short for "quantum mechanics"?

    Cheers,
    Casey
     
  7. q_mech

    q_mech Farmall Cub

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    Excellent! Thank you, that did the trick. I've got a 14mm to 5/16 barbed banjo bolt on the way and a set of aluminum crush washers. I've got enough done to get going on dino diesel for now, and I'll finish up the conversion to biodiesel a little further down the road. I did measure the existing banjo fitting and 14mm is the winner.

    And yes - no grease monkey I, but a quantum mechanic! You wind up with geeky stuff like that when you let nerds work on trucks. :yes:

    http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/113/the-story-of-schroedingers-cat-an-epic-poem

    Cheers, and thanks again
     
  8. cv_scout

    cv_scout Farmall Cub

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    Hahaha...no worries. I used to study aerospace engineering and we had a class we called "q-mech"...

    Keep me posted on how your bio conversion goes...

    Cheers,
    Casey
     
  9. Eddie

    Eddie High Wheeler

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    Quality journalism!

    You addressed the same things I did, only better thought-out and definely less expensively.

    I knew considerably less about B-anything 10 years ago.

    On the Scout, I dropped in a new replacement plastic tank, replacement alcohol-resistant fuel injection hose sections as couplings to the long OEM plastic hoses, Racor fuel filter/water separator, Molex 12mm aluminum fuel banjos at either end of -8AN braided-stainless Aeroquip exotic fuels hose (the crowd cheers "Ooh-Ahh"; my bank account twitched once); like you, I ran it through an old-style all-metal brass prime pump mounted on the injection pump and cleaned the "secret filter":punk: (that term rocks!).

    A half-decade later (that's 1/20th of a century, y'all!), I did the same thing on my Ford F-150/B5.9L, even to tracking down International's air hose/fuel line manufacturer and using the brand (didn't use any high-dollar Aeroquip--good as it is!).

    Ran B100 in both, never had problem one 'til later, when the paint, decals, and glued-on trim around the fill caps on both vehicles bubbled up and leaped off, from overspill; didn't shake the hose enough before pulling enough, I guess.:nono:

    Eddie
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013

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