B5 At Regular Retain C-Store: Since .

Discussion in 'The BioDiesel Plant' started by Eddie, Feb 11, 2013.


  1. Eddie

    Eddie High Wheeler

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    In Houston, one of the commoner gas station/c-stores is the Valero chain. I haven't bought diesel there in quite a while (burned free offroad red :nono: petrodiesel for a good four years).

    The tanks were real close to empty, and Houston Bio Diesel was too far away, so I filled up at the corner Valero.

    Eddie: Guess what?
    Chorus: WHAT?

    Valero's standard diesel offering is now B5! News to me, but cool, especially the low-key way they snuck in the fuel info: Diesel fuel contains 5% biofuel. Guess they felt they hadda be sneaky for the muggles, no?

    So just when and why did the a big chain begin peddling B5? Social conscienve? Guvmint fiat?

    Ed
     
  2. Sammy

    Sammy Y-Block King

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    Noticed the same about a year ago, a little jaunt over to San Antonio had to stop at Love's truck stop and on the pump their little sign said something like it could contain anywhere from 5% to 20% biofuel at any given time. What I've learned from working at the biodump for three years is that is does provide better lubrication than the ULSD, but has a lower cetane number and your mileage does suffer. For what I gotta pay I want the 100% dino juice. Thanks.
    Long story why they are getting it but it benefits them on their bottom line, ie cheaper for them to buy produced than to keep it 100% dino juice.
    How are you getting the red stuff? You need to hook a brotha up. My transfer tank is empty. :yes:
     
  3. joerenwick

    joerenwick Farmall Cub

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    in 2006 petro-diesel was refined from 1500 ppm to 15ppm sulfur to reduce emissions. This is accomplished by hydro-treating the diesel fuel. They say that is why diesel cost more than gasoline now because it costs more to make. I call BS on that being true but I do think that is the excuse they use to charge more. I digress, the point is sulfur is what helps lubricate diesel fuel and when the volume of lubricant was drastically cut from 1500 to 15 that is 100 times less lubricity. The fuel is dry and has been well documented to cause engine damage, injector damage, pump failures and more. The truth is, if you run a diesel that is made before 2006 then your engine was not made to run this new fuel. Even newer engines can benefit from a lubricity additive but is not required to run as most are built a little differently.

    I have read a lot about using burnt motor oil as a fuel supplement and know numerous people that run 50/50 blends of motor oil and diesel fuel though I do not approve it does work.

    a few facts about Biodiesel :
    it actually has a higher Ctane value than petro diesel but it has a lower BTU content.

    just a 2% or B2 blend out lubricates any and every fuel additive on the market.
    This means a B5 or 5% blend is like getting a really slick fuel additive with your petro-diesel.
    the reason people sell it is that i performs better. it is like BP adding "invigorate" fuel additives to the fuel to sell more fuel. and yes the bio is cheaper so they make more money too.

    I have never seen documentation that B5 gets worse mileage.

    Blends more than 20% may get worse mileage depending on the % used and the type engine running it. Like B100 or 100% bio rarely gets you better mileage but I have seen B80 in an international DT466 get better mileage than diesel for the last 6 years at work. Mostly we run B40 in this truck because it seems to be the best blend for it.

    up to B20 has been very well documented to not cause mpg loss. However, depending on the truck it may just not like running Bio. Like ford 6.0's I've seen get worse mpg. But I've seen dodge get better mpg and for some reason Chevy duramax stay about the same. And VW TDI's love it and get better mileage across the board for some reason.

    Biodiesel does have a shelf life of about 6 months similar to gasoline sitting over the winter goes bad. However a diesel goes bad it will still run in an engine burn, unlike a bad gas in a gas engine.

    the reality is: Biodiesel is simply no a good choice if you don't drive your rig a lot. So if you are going to use it seasonal store it with as much petro diesel in the engine as you can.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2015
  4. Sammy

    Sammy Y-Block King

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    My 99 F350 saw a minor loss in mileage and seat of the pants acceleration. That's on B100 or any % of it. I don't believe that the cetane value is higher, the biodump I was at did use cetane improvers when hte numbers just weren't there, otherwise it just met the federal minimum standard for on highway use. Eventually it will be everwhere like ethanol but I will avoid buying it until I have no choice.

    It is a good cleaner, get a little on your vehicle and the paint and pinstripes will come right off.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2015

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