Asbestos insulation

Discussion in 'Irma's Place' started by Nicxt44191, Jun 23, 2019.


  1. Nicxt44191

    Nicxt44191 Farmall Cub

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    Has anyone seen/ heard of ih using asbestos insulation in their refrigerators? I cracked mine open, and it looks like fiberglass........ but I don't know
     
  2. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    Asbestos is a good high-temperature insulator, particularly where other materials would degrade or burn, but it's not great at low or ambient temperatures compared to other materials which would also be cheaper and easier to work with. I see no reason why any company would use it in a refrigerator.
    Most fiberglass fibers will melt in a propane torch, while asbestos withstands an oxy-acetylene flame fairly well, so do a test to assure your self.
     
  3. Nicxt44191

    Nicxt44191 Farmall Cub

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    I read that somewhere, that it was mainly used in ovens, toasters, ect. Before I thought about it, I had removed some with gloves and p100 respirator. I hit it with a map torch and it melted/ degraded pretty fast. It is rather itchy as well, which is a good sign. I didn't know that fiberglass was cheaper. We all know how ih felt about coming out of the pocket, ha ha. Thanks for the info dana, I appreciate it.
     
  4. superfishyall

    superfishyall Farmall Cub

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    I've also found asbestos in undercoating on cars. I had a 46 Chrysler and the undercoating was full of it. My 70 Plymouth Fury had traces. It's not very expensive to have a sample tested.
     
  5. mallen

    mallen High Wheeler

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    And floor tiles, and those crumbly ceiling panels and roofing shingles. The awesome thing about asbestos is, its not just good where you need a insulating fiber for high temperature environments, its cheap and has excellent mechanical properties to provide reinforcement. And on top of that it can maintain that strength at high temperature for example in friction materials like brakes shoes and clutch disks. Dont forget various kinds of adhesives also contained it.

    Then there are the not so awesome things about asbestos. I knew a guy who was a contractor and did a lot of restaurant renovations. He took out a lot of asbestos floor tiles. He tried to keep them wet, which does help reduce aerosolized particles. One time I recall he joked that he smoked a pack a day, so how much worse could the asbestos be. Turns out, its about 100-1000 times worse. He died about a year later. Its just nasty stuff. From what I have read (about 10 or 15 years ago,so there may be more data available now) its not known what,if any level of exposure to asbestos is safe. (thats not to say that there might not be a low level that is harmless, just that we dont know if there is one, or if there is, what that level might be) If you absolutely MUST work with it, then at the very least keep it wet, make sure that any vacuum you use around it has a hepa filter on it and wear an apropriate respirator. Personally,if I HAD to remove some, and I HAD to vacuum something up that had it in it., I would cut the cord off the vacuum when I was done and dispose of it without opening it. The best way to deal with asbestos is often to encapsulate it. For example, if you have a concrete floor covered with asbestos tiles, rather than scraping them off, releasing particulates as you do it, its often better to seal it in an appropriate sealant made for that purposes, lay down plywood over that and then put a new layer of flooring on top of it.

    For the fridge, Id want to figure it out for sure. I lean toward testing a little sample with a torch. But I bet its just fiberglass. That being said, fiber glass fibers, if disturbed and aerosolized actually can cause many of the same problems asbestos does. Its all about the little tiny inert fibers lodging themselves in your tissues. (and why I think all this "debate" about the potential health hazards of nano-materials is so absurd. Of COURSE engineered tiny inert particles lodged in your tissues are going to be as bad for you as naturally occurring tiny inert particles lodged in your tissues. )
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2019
    superfishyall likes this.

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