Affordable DIY Fuel Injection for your IH - The Articles

Discussion in 'Injection Tech' started by Will Marsh, May 16, 2006.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    In this thread you will find Parts 1 and 2 of the Affordable DIY Fuel Injection articles I wrote for web site E-Newsletters #38 and #39, detailing the conversion of my wife's '72 1010 Travelall to a Megasquirt EFI system. Parts 3 and 4 are currently available to Supporting Members in the web site E-Newsletter section in E-Newsletters # 40 and #41, respectively. Part 5, The Conclusion, will be available there in E-Newsletter #42, approx. August 2006. They will eventually be added here, but if you'd like to read them in the meantime, please join the web site and become a Supporting Member.

    Without further ado, here they are:

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 1

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 2

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 3

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 4

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 5
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2007
    walrusmt likes this.
  2. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection for your IH - Part 1

    [​IMG]

    A few months ago I picked up a '72 1010 travelall, "Old Blue", for my wife to use as a daily driver. After a few fits and starts it's become a dependable one, but with the price of gas at nearly $2 per gallon, feeding that Non-IC 392 get's expensive! I'd been looking into Fuel Injection for a while, and so he became the natural home for that project. This will be the first part of a 4 part series documenting how I went about it.

    Here are goals for the project:
    1. Put fuel injection on the 1010 for mileage and drivability.
    2. Keep the cost under the price of a new carburetor. ~$300.
    3. Be able to do the actual installation in a weekend, since the project truck is Kathy's daily driver.
    Yes, I did say $300! Since I'm cheap, not to mention I have 3 kids to feed.

    So you say "How in the world do you plan to pull that off?" A couple years ago I came across a Yahoo Group for "Megasquirt, an affordable DIY fuel injection controller". Bruce Bowling and Al Grippo, along with the help of a community very much like the web site, have created an amazing little piece of hardware here. For about $150, you can get the kit and put it together yourself, or you can buy one already built by a couple of members for around $350. I opted to buy mine from Glen's Garage, total cost for the ECU kit, Stimulator kit, and shipping was $187. Unfortunately, it hadn't arrived in time to be detailed here, so that will come in Part 2. This will by far be the biggest single cost involved in the project. You can find all the details as well as lots of good information about DIY fuel injection in general at http://www.msefi.com.

    So the plan goes something like this:
    • A Megasquirt ECU to run it all
    • A relay box from a late model ford to deliver power to it all
    • A high pressure pump from an E150 van to deliver the fuel
    • A Ford CFI Throttle Body Injection unit for fuel
    Note that since this is a work in progress, the plan may evolve as we move along.

    Why these particular parts? Here is a little bit of my reasoning in selecting them.

    B&G offer a relay box kit to go with the Megasquirt, but I opted not to use it and build the wiring harness directly to the sensors. So I needed to use something to house the relays. While scrounging through the local Pick-n-Pull I came across this relay box in a 90ish Ford Ranger, and thought it would work just perfect for this project. Cost was ~$6.


    [​IMG]


    I chose the E150 pump because it's an external type and by using it I can run both tanks off one high pressure pump. I picked this one up for ~$15 at the local Pick-n-Pull yard, including the bracket and filter.

    [​IMG]


    I chose the Ford TBI units for a couple of reasons. First, they bolt directly on the IH 2bbl manifolds with NO modifications or adapters. Ford used them on the 5.0L rated at 170hp, so the injectors may be just a little small for my 190hp bone stock 392, but since Ford ran them at 38psi, you can get a bit more fuel from them by raising the fuel pressure if I decide it's necessary. The throttle bores on the V8 version are the same size as the stock bores in the IH manifold, so they should flow plenty of air.



    [​IMG]


    The one on the left is off a 3.8L V6, and has smaller bores and injectors. The one on the right is from a 5.0L V8 in an '84 Lincoln LSC, and that is the one that will be used for this project. I paid ~$20 each for these at the local yards.


    While scrounging those I also picked up 2 O2 sensors and 2 Temp sensors from 90ish GM cars for the project, mostly for the connectors, but they'll be used at first unless they turn out to be bad. Total for them was ~$10.


    So I've picked up all the major components I'll need. Total outlay so far: $187 + $6 + $15 + $20 + $10 = $238. So far so good. :)

    Part 2 will detail building the Megasquirt ECU and preparing all the parts for installation. Stay tuned.

    Originally Published in web site E-Newsletter #38 on 1/23/05
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2008
  3. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 2

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 2

    By Will Marsh

    [​IMG]

    Welcome to part 2 of my DIY Fuel Injection project. This article will detail the installation and initial tuning of the system.

    For review, here are goals for the project:
    1. Put fuel injection on the 1010 for mileage and drivability.
    2. Keep the cost under the price of a new carburetor. ~$300.
    3. Be able to do the actual installation in a weekend, since the project truck is Kathy's daily driver.
    At the time Part 1 was written, I'd spent a total of $238 on parts for the installation, including all the major components.

    My Megasquirt ECU kit arrived from Glen's Garage on December 8th, 4 weeks to the day from when I ordered it. I can say the wait was worth it! You can save a couple of bucks if you buy the partial kit from B&G, and the rest from Digikey/etc. But for the little extra Glen makes on the kit's, the One-stop shopping and pre-cut case (not to mention only one shipping charge instead of 3 or 4) are definitely worth the wait. In addition, Glen's superb packaging of the electronic components will literally save you hours of sorting out all the parts in the Digikey order!

    Here is an example of Glen's packaging.

    [​IMG]

    I'll not go into the detail of building the kits, since the excellent documentation on the Megasquirt site explains it better than I ever could. I'll just relate a few comments and helpful hints I picked up during the process.

    Although I'd done some soldering before, I'd never done any on PC boards. To say I was nervous about it would definitely be an understatement. I had no doubt I could do it, but getting over the hump to get started took some effort. After reading Neon John's Deployment Guide again (for the fourth or fifth time) as a refresher, I sat down one Sunday morning and started on the Stimulator kit. An hour later it was done, and it went so smoothly I was suprised and now very confident that I could complete the actual ECU with no problems.

    Here's a picture of the completed Stimulator.

    [​IMG]

    It was a week before I had time to assemble the ECU. I sat down the next Sunday morning and started soldering away. 7 hours later (including 2 trips to Radio Shack for a DB9 cable I was sure I had and couldn't find, then got the wrong one on the first trip) it was done and working perfectly on the Stimulator. A note here, though.

    Find ALL the tools/cables/etc you'll need and have them at the bench BEFORE you start! This should be obvious, but I didn't and wasted at least 2 hours because of it. You will need a soldering iron, rosin core solder, a pair of dikes (side cut wire cutters), a pair of needle nose pliers, small phillips and flat screwdrivers, a digital multimeter, and the above mentioned male DB9 - female DB9 straight through cable to connect it to the computer. I'd also have a roll of small solder wick to make removing excess solder easier, although I did without it, and only really needed it once near the end, when I bridged the leads on one of the output transistors.

    Here's a pic of the assembled unit, without the cover.

    [​IMG]

    Then I had to assemble the wiring harness to connect it all up. This turned out to be the hardest part for me, soldering all those big wires into the little connections on the DB37 connector. My little $9 15W soldering iron wasn't up to the task on the big wires, so I borrowed the 60W soldering gun from our shop. I made mine 10ft long to start with, then trimmed it down as I laid out the wires and connected them up. I spent about $15 on wire and loom in addition to some I already had.

    For the O2 sensors I took my 2 junkyard sensors to the local muffler shop with the truck. $30 and an hour later they were installed in the downpipes just below the manifold connections, and I was driving home. You only need one, but I had them put the second one in the other pipe while I was there for later use.

    Christmas weekend was chosen to do the installation, since I had 2 long weekends in a row. I figured that should offer plenty of time to get it all installed and reasonably tuned before Kathy had to start driving it again.

    Since the ECU has to be mounted in the cab (it won't handle the temperatures under the hood) I decided to mount it to the passenger side kick panel. I used a 1 inch hole saw to drill a hole for the wiring harness between the heater box and the inner fender into the cab. I laid out the harness with the sensor/injector/grounds running to the engine and the power/relay wires running up tp the front between the radiator and the grill where I decided to mount the Power distribution box. For the moment, the ECU sits on the floor, but will be permanently mounted when I finish playing with it.

    [​IMG]

    I removed the Holley 4bbl carb, pulled the squarebore manifold, and installed the stock 2bbl manifold using a pair of LPG gaskets to block the exhaust crossover. Then I bolted the Ford CFI throttle body on the manifold using the 1/4 inch spacer that I got with the throttle body, and 2 holley 2bbl gaskets. I also ran a vacuum line from the manifold into the cab along the wiring harness for the ECU while I was replumbing the vacuum lines for the new manifold.

    [​IMG]

    Next, I mounted and plumbed the fuel pumps. I bent the bottom mounting area of the E150 bracket out at an angle so both flanges would lay against the inner fender between the heater box and battery, then attached it with 4 large sheet metal screws. I already had an electric pump mounted to the frame in the passenger fenderwell to feed the carb. I used a piece of standard fuel hose from that pump to a steel inline fuel filter with 2 outlets, one inline and one 90 degrees. The 90 degree outlet is pointed straight up to vent any air to the return, and is connected to a plastic T fitting at the return from the throttle body. The inline outlet is connected to the inlet of the high pressure pump using the stock E150 fitting with the hose clamped to it. These are all low pressure connections using single hose clamps just like the carburetor setup.

    I left the factory E150 tube from the outlet of the high pressure pump to the high pressure filter mounted on the bracket, then connected the factory fittings from the filter and throttle body inlet tube with ~2 feet of EFI fuel hose using double clamps at each end. These are the only high pressure connections I modified, and this way the complete high pressure circuit is ~3 feet long. Here is a picture showing the high pressure pump mounting arrangement.

    [​IMG]

    I connected the return line from the throttle body to the top of the T mentioned earlier. The leg of the T is connected to the return line to the tank. The other side of the T is connected to the 3 port low pressure filter. In this setup the 3 port filter acts as a small surge tank, and the return from the thottle body provides a bit of pressure for the low pressure pump to work against. I used one of the original nylon lines to the vapor canister for the return, and moved it to run directly into one of the return fittings at the top of the tank instead of into the vapor seperator.

    With that completed I started connecting wires. Both fuel pumps are powered through the fuel pump relay in the PD box, and both injector circuits are powered through another relay there. Both those relays get their power from the ECU relay, which is controlled by the ignition switch and grounded through an Impact Safety switch (pulled from a 90ish Ford) mounted on the inner fender. This kills all power to the fuel injection system on a significant impact to the vehicle.

    Once I had all the wires connected, it was time for the first start. I hooked the laptop up, and after several tries, I got it started and idling. Let it warm up for a bit, and suddenly it died. After some troubleshooting and a bunch of failed attempts to restart it, I determined the high pressure fuel pump had failed. One of the hazards of using junkyard parts.

    I picked a new one up from NAPA the next day for ~$80. So much for my $300 budget. In addition, my Toshiba laptop I was going to use to tune it died about the same time. I picked up a Dell on Ebay for ~$85 (including shipping) to replace it (P166/72meg/2.1gig), which was an upgrade from the P120 Toshiba I've had for several years. The tuning software will run on any computer that has a serial port and Win95 or newer. There are even some people running it on old 386 laptops, but I'd recommend getting the fastest one you can afford with at least 64megs of memory. You can find one like mine for about $150 any day, or might even beat my $85 with a little luck and judicious bidding.

    With the new fuel pump installed, it started right up and idled fine. Because of the laptop failure, I did the initial driveway tuning with my desktop WinXP computer sitting in the backseat running off a drop cord from the garage, and the first drives running it off the power inverter from my bus while waiting for the replacement laptop to arrive! But that's a story for Part 3.

    At this point, everything is installed and running. Costs for the installation so far are:
    • $238 detailed in Part 1.
    • $15 in electrical wire.
    • $30 to have the O2 sensors installed.
    • $80 for the new HP fuel pump.
    • $25 for miscellaneous hose, clamps, electrical connectors, filters, etc.
    Those total $388. So I'm now $88 over budget, mostly due to the bad junkyard fuel pump.

    In addition, I spent $85 to replace my dead laptop, and $38 for a fuel pressure tester. I don't include these in the direct project costs since the laptop get's used for other purposes as well, and the FP tester is a tool you will need if you want to work on fuel injection systems.

    Part 3 will detail the tuning process. Look for it in web site #40.

    Originally Published in web site E-Newsletter #39 on 1/23/05
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2008
  4. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 3 : Tuning

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 3

    By Will Marsh

    [​IMG]

    Welcome to part 3 of my DIY Fuel Injection project. This article will detail the tuning of the system.

    For review, here are goals for the project:
    1. Put fuel injection on the 1010 for mileage and drivability.
    2. Keep the cost under the price of a new carburetor. ~$300.
    3. Be able to do the actual installation in a weekend, since the project truck is Kathy's daily driver.
    At the time Part 2 was written, I'd spent a total of $388 on the installation, everything is installed and it's idling in the driveway. :)

    Since the replacement laptop hadn't arrived yet, I dragged the desktop computer out and set it up in the back seat with the monitor, keyboard, and mouse in the front. A drop cord from the garage provided power for it while I adjusted the idle and accelleration settings in the driveway. The tuning software for Windows is called Megatune, and it's very easy to use. Basically change a setting, see what it does, and if it doesn't do what you want change it back. It's as easy as making a change and clicking the "Send to ECU" button.

    Once it's idling well (took about 10 min) it's time to start tweaking the VE Table. There's a very nice program called MSTweak3000 that will take a datalog and use it to adjust the VE table from the O2 sensor readings. So the next step is to create a datalog. For using MSTweak, you want to set the O2 correction to give it a LOT of leeway to adjust the mixture. Something like a 2% step and 50% maximum so it reacts quickly and generates lots of crossing points.

    Start with a nice easy drive around the block a couple times. I hooked up the power inverter out of my bus for this, and plugged the desktop into it. Start a datalog by pressing ALT-L in Megatune, and just take it nice and easy. Steady state is the key here, MSTweak uses the crossing points from the O2 sensor while running in closed loop mode. You want to keep the throttle steady and let the controller adjust the fuel to generate the crossing points. When you get done, stop the datalog and open it in MSTweak. It will take your VE table from the MSQ configuration file, and generate a new VE table based on the crossing points from the O2 sensor. You can send the new table to the controller directly from MSTweak, but I chose to use it as a suggestion and edited the VE Tables by hand in Megatune. Call me paranoid. :)

    Next you create another datalog on a bit longer drive. A lightly traveled highway is great for this. You want to hold it at each speed and power levels for a minute or so to let the O2 correction do it's work. While you do this you want to note what the MAP and RPM readings are at the various cruise speeds, as you'll need that information when you start tuning for mileage.

    After 3-4 more progressively longer and more varied drives, with tweaking between each one, you can have a pretty good map of where Stoichiometric (14.7:1) mixture is on your particular combination in an afternoon. The vehicle will run fine that way for most situations, although it won't produce loads of power and you won't get great mileage. So now you need to adjust the table to get the proper mixtures for Power (12.5:1) and lean cruise (16.5:1)

    I found this easiest to do on paper. Write out your VE table on a grid, with the RPM and MAP settings. Remember when I told you to note the MAP and RPMs for your various cruise speeds? Plot those on top of your table, and draw a "Cruise" line through those points. This line is where you want the mixtures to be ~ 16:1, about 10 Kpa above that line you want to leave it at 14.7:1, and about 20 Kpa above it you want to be ~13:1. Draw a second "Power" line 20Kpa above the "Cruise" line. Time to dig out the calculator.

    The formula for adjusting the ratio's is (stoich/desired) X current VE = desired VE. So if you're adjusting for Power you take the Stoich VE value in the table and multiply it by 1.176 (14.7 / 12.5 = 1.176). If the VE value is 50, you'd want to change it to 59 (50 X 1.176 = 58.8, rounded up to 59 since the table only takes whole numbers) to get a 12.5:1 mixture at that MAP/RPM point. Conversely, if you're adjusting for cruise mileage, you take the Stoich VE value and multiply it by .891 (14.7 / 16.5 = .891). So if the VE value is 50, you'd want to change it to 45 (50 X .891 = 44.6, rounded up to 45). Since we're dealing in whole numbers on the table and you'll need to tweak it a bit afterwards anyhow, 1.2 and .9 for the multipliers are close enough for us. :)

    Take the bins along the "Cruise" line you drew and adjust the values down by multiplying them by .9 to get the new value. Then go to the bins on the "Power" line and adjust it up by multiplying the value there by 1.2 to get the new value. Smooth the map out around those two lines so the transition values between, above, and below them look appropriate. Don't worry, it's not Rocket Science! When you're done you'll have a VE map that will run your engine fairly decent without O2 correction, although it will need tweaked to get it right for your combination. But there's one more factor you have to adjust for before you're ready to go.

    Normally you will want to run Closed Loop with O2 correction. The problem is that with a narrow band O2 sensor, Closed loop will always try to get back to Stoichiometric mixture, 14.7:1. Since we don't want it there under Power or Cruise, we have to account for the 02 correction in the VE map.

    First, you have to decide how much you want the O2 correction to be able to adjust the mixture. The Megamanual suggests a 1% step with a 5% maximum correction. This is what I've been using, and it works pretty good.

    Since the O2 correction will max out in Power and cruise modes, you then need to adjust the map values according to your maximum correction. The values in the VE table are percentages, so it's a direct corellation. Take all the bins on or below the "Cruise" line and subtract 5 from the value, and add 5 to the value of all the bins at or above the "Power" line. While you're doing that take a minute to smooth out the edges of the map, then look over the whole table for values that look out of place, and adjust them.

    Take it out for a test drive and see how well you did. :D There will be spots that still need to be tweaked, but your basic VE table is now complete and should be pretty close.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2008
  5. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 4 : Spark Control

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 4: Spark Control

    By Will Marsh

    [​IMG]
    Welcome to part 4 of my DIY Fuel Injection project. This article will detail upgrading the system to add ignition advance control.

    One note before I begin: Since I did this upgrade in March 2005, the Megasquirt group has released both the V3 mainboard, and the MSII Processor upgrade. Either one includes better ways to accomplish Ignition control than what I will detail here, and if I were to start this project today, I would certainly take advantage of one of those other options, particularly the V3 mainboard. However, because they were not available at the time, they are beyond the scope of this article.

    The first step to getting spark control on the Megasquirt was to switch it from the fuel only B&G code that comes with the MS kit to the MegaSquirt'nSpark-Extra code (MSnS-E, or Extra). At the time I used the current stable code, which was version 021u2, now it is version 029q2. You can download it as a zip file from the MSnS-E website. Unzip it and follow the instructions in the readme file. A program called Download.exe is included in the package, and makes it easy to change code versions. You will need to export your VE table from the B&G code, and import it into the new Extra code. Megatune will automatically scale it from the 8x8 B&G table to the 12x12 Extra table. Verify all the settings (There will be a BUNCH of new settings in Megatune after the code change), and take it for a test drive to verify all is well before starting the hardware changes necessary to add ignition control.

    To let the Megasquirt control ignition, we basically need to make 2 changes to the distributor and ignition circuit. First, we need to lock out the advance mechanisms in the distributor and set the initial timing/trigger angle. Second, since the Pertronix IgnitorII in the distributor will be acting as our trigger signal, we need to provide a device to drive the coil from the signal the MS unit provides. In this case I chose to use a GM HEI-4 module for the coil driver. More on that in a minute.

    Locking out the distributor proved to be simpler than I imagined. I simply removed the springs from the advance weights, and removed the hose from the vacuum advance canister. This causes the distributor to stay at it's maximum mechanical advance point any time the engine is turning, and puts the rotor at just about the ideal spot for the range of timing that we need. Back the distributor up a bit (otherwise it will be at about 30deg advance), start it up, and set the timing to your desired trigger angle (normally 10 degrees). That will also be your cranking tiiming setting. I found that this 392 liked it much better at 14 degrees, so I used that instead. Just set the appropriate number in the trigger angle box in Megatune. I keep saying I'm going to fix the advance weights in place either with safety wire or a couple of tack welds, but I've run it like that for over 10,000 miles with no problems.

    For the coil driver, I used the GM HEI-4 module that I mentioned above, along with a 4 position terminal strip. You also will need 2 800ohm or 1Kohm resistors for the pullup resistors to the signal circuits, I chose a pair of 1Kohm, 1/2W resistors. The HEI-4 needs to be heatsinked to something. I used a piece of 1" x 1/8" flat bar to build a bracket, with the HEI-4 on one side, and the terminal strip on the other. I curled the resistor leads with needlenose pliers, then installed them on one side of the terminal strip between #1/2, and #3/2, then bent them down against the bracket, and used some hot glue to hold them in place. With this arrangement on the terminal strip, #1 is the MS trigger circuit, #2 is the power supply, and #3 is the coil trigger circuit. #4 is the ground connected to the common ground point at the back of the head. I spent ~$14 at Autozone for the HEI-4 module, and ~$6 at Radioshack for the terminal strip and resistors.

    Here are a couple pics of the HEI4/coil driver module.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Here is the wiring diagram for the Coil Driver Module.

    [​IMG]
    After it's all hooked up and you've loaded the Advance table, adjust the setting to run in MSnS Distributor mode, and fire it up.

    Look for Part 5: The Conclusion in the next issue of the web site.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 11, 2008
  6. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 5 : Conclusion

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 5 : Conclusion

    By Will Marsh

    [​IMG]

    Welcome to part 5 of my DIY Fuel Injection project. This will be the final article in this series, so I'll cover the big changes in Megasquirt since I began the project nearly 2 years ago, things I learned during the project that I'd do differently next time, and try to tie up all the loose ends.

    Megasquirt Advances

    When I started this project back in 2004, the only way to use a Megasquirt Controller for both fuel and ignition was with the experimental MSnS-Extra code. Since that time, several things have happened:

    1. The MSnS-Extra Code has been finalized. It's the most full featured version, but it only runs on the MS1 processor. It will control everything from fuel and timing to Nitrous, Turbo boost, and Water injection. About the only thing it won't do is control a Stepper type IAC motor (GM TBI, among others).

    2. The Megasquirt II Processor upgrade has been released. It has better timing resolution in the injector circuits, but is not compatible with the Extra code, and The MSII code is limited to mostly basic engine functions. Ignition options are limited to a Distributor or Ford's EDIS until the GPIO and Router boards are available for it.

    3. The Version 3 Mainboard has been released. This is a big step up, since it has the Flyback board circuits, a VR Sensor conditioning circuit and a VB921 Coil Driver circuit on the board. This means you can plug Bill USN's Duraspark conversion directly into the MS unit, and run a regular coil directly out of the MS unit, without any other modules!

    4. The Megatune Tuning software has added a bunch of features, including Autotune. So you can now set it to tune itself.

    If I was to start this project over today, I'd use the MS1/V3 Kit with the MSnS-Extra code. This kit is still under $200 from most vendors, and is perfectly adequate for 99% of the vehicles we're discussing here.

    You could also use the MSII/V3 kit, but it will cost about $70 more. The only real advantage I see is that if you have a GM TBI unit, MSII will run the IAC valve, but MS1/Extra won't. Add the GPIO and Router boards (to give the additional functionality to get what Extra has, + a bunch more) at the projected prices, and you're approaching $500 for just the components to build the kits. :(

    Things I'd do differently

    With any project there are things you try that just don't work quite like you planned. Here is a list of some of the things I'll do differently on my next build.

    1. Buy a harness that already has the DB37 connector attached! One of my biggest headaches in building this project was trying to solder all those great big wires into the little bitty cups on the DB37 connector. By the time I collected all the wire I needed, I didn't save a lot over the $65 or so the vendors charge for a harness with the connector attached. Add a whole afternoon cursing the wires, connector, and soldering iron to get that connector on, I'll buy the harness next time, thank you.

    2. Mount the High Pressure Fuel Pump down on the frame, rather than in the engine bay. The short HP line to the TBI unit is great, but mounted on the fenderwell it amplifies the "thumping" of the pump enough that I can hear it at idle over the rumble of the glasspacks. I've also seen some minor "heat soak" issues where the engine would run rough for a couple minutes after a hot restart. In this Travelall I'll move it down behind the Passenger side tank on the frame.

    3. Use a GM 454 TBI on a 392. Even with the fuel pressure cranked up to make the 46lb Ford Injectors actually put out 53lbs or so, you're still limited to a maximum of about 225 HP, and it's relatively easy to rail out the injectors on a very cold start if you rev it up. The same would be true of a GM 350 TBI unit. While they would be fine for a stock 304 or 345, the injectors are really too small for a 392. The largest injectors available for the Ford CFI unit are 49lb, so you can't just go to larger injectors. Best of both worlds on a 392 would probably be a GM 350 TBI unit with the larger 65lb injectors from a 454 TBI.

    And in conclusion

    Overall, I'd conclude I met the original goals I set. The initial build came in about 25% over budget ($380 vs. $300 bugeted) but really that is pretty reasonable for a first time install with mostly junkyard parts. Mileage improved to an average of 10-12, mostly in city or Interstate driving. 4 tanks averaged 15 mpg over 150 mi each, but those were all when I was on the hwy below 60mph and driving it REALLY nice. About what I expected, not quite what I hoped to see.

    I'd certainly do it all again. Look for my next project, the MPFI Turbo 345 Tow rig, in a future edition of the web site newsletter.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2007
  7. Will Marsh

    Will Marsh Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2001
    Messages:
    3,315
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    In this thread you will find Parts 1 and 2 of the Affordable DIY Fuel Injection articles I wrote for web site E-Newsletters #38 and #39, detailing the conversion of my wife's '72 1010 Travelall to a Megasquirt EFI system. Parts 3 and 4 are currently available to Supporting Members in the web site E-Newsletter section in E-Newsletters # 40 and #41, respectively. Part 5, The Conclusion, will be available there in E-Newsletter #42, approx. August 2006. They will eventually be added here, but if you'd like to read them in the meantime, please join the web site and become a Supporting Member.

    NEW 7/4/2006: Part 3 is now available to all Members.

    NEW 12/3/2006: Part 4 is now available to all Members.

    NEW 5/20/2007: Part 5 is now available to all Members.

    Without further ado, here they are:

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 1 : System Selection

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 2 : Installation

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 3 : Tuning

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 4 : Spark Control

    Affordable DIY Fuel Injection, Part 5 : Conclusion
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2007
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page