$600 Scout II

Discussion in 'Binder Builds' started by Perdido, Aug 16, 2020.


  1. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 Y-Block King

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Western North Carolina
    You won't get oil to the rockers unless you understand the IH SV-8 oiling system.
    See attached SV-8 Lubrication Diagram.........
     

    Attached Files:

    TorqueMonster1 likes this.
  2. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Thanks, so turning the oil pump with a drill doesn’t move oil to the rockers? I’m really confused and thought the purpose of spinning the OP was moving oil at pressure through the lubrication system. I’m afraid I don’t understand.
    Thanks, Perdido
     
  3. 1975IH200

    1975IH200 Y-Block King

    Joined:
    May 7, 2007
    Messages:
    3,312
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Western North Carolina
    Did you study the diagram???

    Oil is supplied to the left side rockers from the #2 cam bearing.
    Oil is supplied to the right side rockers from the #4 cam bearing.
    The oil hole in the cam bearing only lines up to supply oil once every 360° of camshaft rotation, and at different times for the left & right sides.
    SO, you need to have someone slowly rotate the engine by hand while the oil pump is being spun by your priming tool.
    Watching for oil flow on either side, stop when one side gets oil and let it flow for a while.
    The rocker shaft then supplies oil to all the rockers and pushrods.
    Then turn it until the other side lines up and gets oil, and let the oil flow on that side.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2020
    winchested likes this.
  4. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Thanks, so turning the oil pump with a drill doesn’t move oil to the rockers? I’m really confused and thought the purpose of spinning the OP was moving oil at pressure through the lubrication system. I’m afraid I don’t understand.
    Thanks, Perdido
     
  5. mongocanfly

    mongocanfly High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2017
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes Received:
    1,700
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Alabama
    What hes saying is the oil gets to the rockers,thru the camshaft bearing oilholes..if the oil holes arnt lined up it's just like have a valve shut..slowly turn the crank by hand, while spinning the pump,,when you see oil at the rockers on one side, stop turning the crank..and let it oil the rocker shafts good..then turn the crank again until you get oil to the other side,...stop turnng turnng crank again, and let it oil the other side..
     
  6. mongocanfly

    mongocanfly High Wheeler

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2017
    Messages:
    2,296
    Likes Received:
    1,700
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Alabama
    You can see where the oil passes thru the cam bearings, and goes on to the rockers..
    20200822_160342.jpg
     
    jeff campbell likes this.
  7. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    JJ came to the rescue with a complete wiring harness to replace the chopped up spaghetti I have, so that will make life much easier. The service manual showed up while we were gone and it looks very comprehensive and I’ll put it in several 2” binders to make it more manageable. We will pick up the rotisserie sometime this week depending on school...my wife and I are both retired, but our son and DIL work and school is online only.
    Since we’ve decided to pull the tub and do it right, what’s the best way to do a modest lift? This Scout will be a weekend cruiser with light duty off road, so I want it to look good, but be a good driver. As I understand it, SOA, aftermarket springs, taller shackles and taller mounts between the frame and body are the most common ways to do this. A little extra caster makes it more driveable as well.
    Thanks, Perdido
     
  8. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Greg,
    Thank You! Post #25 & 26 really help me understand what you’re saying and I’ll pull the valve covers to watch for oil. We are hoping that this engine is in decent shape since a full rebuild is not in the budget at this time. Now that we have a manual I’ll be able to plumb the engine hoses, etc. correctly since lots of stuff is plugged with bolts.
    Thanks again, Perdido
     
  9. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Good day for deconstruction and cleaning up the engine so I could actually get a socket on the spark plugs. They were pretty oil/carbon fouled and I replaced them along with turning the engine while spinning the oil pump. The engine turns over relatively easily with the plugs out and feels like it has decent compression. I’ll know more once I do a leak down test, but I won’t be surprised if I have a few stuck valves and rings. I’m picking up square tube for the bracing tomorrow and probably use JJs EFF282E6-DD02-4FDE-A98B-55F4883AC2DC.jpeg BD2958E3-EEA6-42BC-A3CA-CE88521C2045.jpeg 4076D70B-9657-4859-8A07-A8733352FA56.jpeg 4F3DD7A2-DD74-4156-8D71-B409E7D2A69A.jpeg method on the front and an X brace where the tailgate normally lives. If the sheet metal order comes in tomorrow I’ll start fitting the floors and rear quarter patches along with the seal lip on the passenger side, if not I’ll go buy a few of the tools I’ve destroyed removing the rear deck. My Steck Seam Buster has gone thru several cars, but I managed to break it twice today...the last time was fatal.
    Perdido
     
  10. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Messages:
    5,571
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Castalian Springs, TN
    Looks like your truck had AC, are you going to put back on it?

    JJ in TN
     
  11. mporter52

    mporter52 Binder Driver

    Joined:
    May 17, 2005
    Messages:
    620
    Likes Received:
    41
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    You have to get it back to TDC after rotating it right?
     
    Perdido likes this.
  12. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Yep, #8 on compression and line up timing at 5*. I hope that will let me start so i can actually time it.
    Perdido
     
  13. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    JJ,
    We probably will. Our service manual came today and the heater is totally separate from the A/C system. I would love to come up with a solution that combined heat and A/C into one unit with vents installed in the dash. Once I remove this bed overlay from the Scout I’ll be able to tell what needs to be repaired...never seen so much seam sealer in my life. When I install the new cargo floor I’ll weld it in from underneath.
    Perdido
     
  14. TravelerMan79

    TravelerMan79 Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2020
    Messages:
    384
    Likes Received:
    109
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Ottawa, ON
    I agree in ttrying to combine the heater with the AC system. Can't imagine not having AC to help defrost the windshield. Additionally, having a heater in the back under the rear seat would be nice or maybe even under the PS seat. My 97 Lexus LX450 had a "rear" heater located under the front PS. It made a huge difference in the winter time, and the Traveler is way bigger in the rear with a lot more glass. I guess it all comes down to when/how you are going to use your rig.
     
  15. jmeister

    jmeister Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2016
    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    35
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    As to the heater for the back seat, I was about 14 years old when we bought our first Scout II and therefore sat in the back seat. My feet were always cold in the Michigan winters but there was so much heat up front I couldn't get Dad to turn it up higher. One day I put my hand down there and realized the warm air from the front circulated up and over the seats to the back, cooled, and pushed the cold air forward under the back seat onto my feet. You could feel the cold breeze from under the back seat. So we compressed a piece of foam under the seat across its width to block that forward cold air flow and problem solved. Never had cold feet again (in the Scout).
     
  16. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Messages:
    5,571
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Castalian Springs, TN
    The AC in these things were not part of the original design. It was a $462 upgrade when you bought it new if you wanted it or not. Thanks to the kindness of jmeister (Jon thanks again for the use of the crimping tool!) I was able to get mine retrofitted with a Sanden R134 and the original under dash parts. But it still took me 3 separate units to make one good one. If you look thru my build thread you can see how and what I did. My '76 is a Patriot so I really wanted it to be stock or at least look that way. It probably would have been simpler to go with a new unit but what fun would that be? I want to say that Scoutco offers a brand new aftermarket unit/kit. I think that Jon got his ac kit from Anything Scout. Somewhere along the way with mine I feel like I saw a combined heat/ac unit? Of course, that would require some engineering to make all of that work with your stock defrosters etc but probably doable. I can tell you from my expierecne it is awful tight up against the top of the cowl in the passenger area.

    JJ in TN
     
  17. J.J.

    J.J. Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2003
    Messages:
    5,571
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Castalian Springs, TN
    My dad had Travelalls and with that huge front seat there was no way warm or cool air was EVER going to make it to the rear. His 1st '57 T-all had a heater under the backseat. The '70 did not. I was planning ahead a few years ago and got a rear unit out of a conversion van in a junkyard. If I ever get to that project that is the plan there. That might be the fix for your plan too TravlerMan.

    JJ in TN
     
  18. Josh Schrecengost

    Josh Schrecengost Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2020
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    8
    As to your lift question, lots of options. I did a 2.5 rough country suspension and kept SUA. Lots of pros and cons to every lift method. My rational was slightly larger tires while maintaining low center of gravity. I really think a cut and turn on the axle/yokes is in my future too to improve caster and drive ability
     
  19. jeff campbell

    jeff campbell Lives in an IH Dealership

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2003
    Messages:
    15,640
    Likes Received:
    1,628
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    lima,ohio
    Had a 66 - 1000 T'all that had a heater under rear seat.
     
  20. Perdido

    Perdido Farmall Cub

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2019
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    27
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    More progress yesterday and this morning. I welded in the door braces and worked on a few small dents, cleaned up some small parts, derusted and primed. One of the engine builders I use for MGs turned me on to some chemicals for cleaning parts and removing rust and since I’m lazy it works well. I didn’t know if this is something the International community used, so I thought I would share. The first product is SuperClean and I use it to remove grease and paint, soak heads and engine blocks, etc. It does a great job and is water based, can be used as a soak or spray. After SuperClean I soak in Evaporust to remove rust and any paint that remains...sometimes I soak long enough to remove zinc plating if I’m going to replate hardware. SuperClean works great on rubber, but be very careful with aluminum or it will darken it.
    Perdido E20CE448-3E3F-4254-8DC9-43146ECA88D4.jpeg 6B0B90AA-3D65-4706-885A-1C6A72F32697.jpeg 68A84937-4ACE-4EDF-9812-ABFA50EC7BB5.jpeg
     
    JDMJNKY likes this.

Share This Page