40 year old York A/C compressor

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by INT77345, Oct 15, 2016.


  1. INT77345

    INT77345 Farmall Cub

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    got a scout II with the original air conditioning system
    the 40 year old york compressor still works and still blows cold air, but it is very loud.
    is there a way to oil the compressor ? or is all the oil in the Freon charge. ?
    i attached a picture from the internet of the york compressor. common sense is kinda telling me the bolt/screw in the middle would access the crank case of the compressor and there must be oil in there. is that correct ? and if that is correct can a man remove that bolt/screw with out discharging the A/C system. again common sense says there would not be a freon charge in the crank case of the compressor. but really i dont know, i have never opened up this compressor. any ideas out there ?

    IMG_9433.jpg
     
  2. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Yes, the freon is in the crankcase too and you don't want to remove that screw. If the system hasn't recently been recharged with freon, meaning there's no reason to assume it all leaked out at some time in the past, then there's also no reason to assume it's low on oil. The amount of both oil and freon used in a system falls within a narrow range, and too much of either is bad, just as too little is. The only way to accurately determine how much oil is present probably requires more knowledge and equipment then most people have; besides being in the compressor, some gets carried throughout the system and that may vary over time, depending on operating conditions. Any markings to show what freon is in it now? R-12? Or is the Scout new to you so you really don't know its history?

    What kind of noise is being produced? Have you ever heard the York style compressor running, so have something to compare this one to?

    Kinda ironic that I just pulled an old FoMoCo-marked York out of storage last week and was looking to give it away, so this thread shows up today....
     
  3. mallen

    mallen Y-Block King

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    If you by some miracle have a charge of r12 in that thing it's like gold
     
  4. INT77345

    INT77345 Farmall Cub

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    hey yall
    thanks for getting back to me.
    the scout has been in our family sense new. its had a good well maintained life
    earlier this summer something knocked a hole in the condenser and the freon leaked out. replaced condenser, and i charged it back up my self, this was the first time i had done it alone. my grandfather worked at a refrigerant plant, and he would help me with the A/C. but he has passed on.
    yes, the compressor was always noisy, this year just seems like more noise, maybe i am just getting older and noticing it more.

    as it sits right now, it is charged with R12 , was charged in early august, and no signs of leaks or freon, or no oil dripping out of the compressor it self. cools good, just makes a lot of racket. The compressor can be isolated from the rest of the system by turning the valves on the high and low ports closed correct ?

    what is the FOMOCO compressor you got out of storage? is it the same or like the on used by IH ?
     
  5. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Yes, it can and I believe the compressor can be removed while the valves are closed too (leaving the valves attached to the hoses), if one were swapping compressors. I'm not sure if the access port on the valve is open when when the hose inlet/outlet port is closed, but think it should be. Do you have an evacuation pump to suck down a system? Also assume the access ports have Shrader valves, but am not sure.
    I have never closely examined an IH compressor, but assume all the Yorks were built basically the same. Both sides of my case have the plug you referred to earlier and both sides have holes in a four bolt pattern with spacing about 3 7/16" tall, 4 9/16 wide. Think it uses 3/8'-16 bolts. The tag on mine gives a model number of C9AA-2875A2, and has the serial number Y789158k. Looks like a date code (?) of 069 below and a note about using R-12. The top valves are both closed, they have brass caps on the access ports, and have fine straight exterior threads of 2 different sizes for compression fittings from the hoses. One internal 'O' ring still remains, one is missing. The clutch has been off and the shaft taper is a bit rusty; don't know the taper, but it's steep. The key is still in place.
    If you needed to replace your compressor, I understand there are rotary ones of a newer design (Sanden) which work well. Other threads here discuss this in some detail. The Yorks are mostly now used as on-board air compressors, I understand.

    FWIW, here's what a search of that number brings up. I saw some good links to get information on the Pirate site listed:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=ford+C9AA-2875A2&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
  6. 1949 KB-3

    1949 KB-3 Farmall Cub

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    Are you sure the noise is NOT from the pulley and bearing in the front hub clutch?
    .
    .
    .
     
  7. INT77345

    INT77345 Farmall Cub

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    No I am not sure. It very well could be the clutch assembly
     
  8. pnwscout

    pnwscout Farmall Cub

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    Being an a/c technician for the navy I can tell you unless you have the proper certificate you can't get the oil you need for that compressor. The York systems don't leak that often unless its from one of the lines going to/from the compressor, also the oil and refrigerant are always mixed in the compressor no way around it so unless you get the system evacuated first you should not open it up. Your best bet is to try the pulley first then if that's not the case take it to a technician and have them look over the compressor. The valves you asked about are for maintenance access (charging and evacuating the system) and can either isolate the system or the compressor from each other but most systems on cars and trucks have the receiver built into the compressor for saving space or non at all at which the charge is critical for proper operation. Feel free to drop me a pm if you need any lengthy explanations.

    ~Andrew
     
  9. Greg R

    Greg R Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Did you EVACUATE IT first BEFORE adding the replacement 12? If not, you probably have air and non-condensables in the system which can make for very high pressure rise across the compressor and stress it and might also worsen any noise. To do this right you will need a set of gauges, a vacuum pump on hand and someway to measure the correct amount of refrigerant. Without these BASIC tools, you working in the dark and all bets are off. Maybe you have and didn't include it in your description. Please let us know.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016
  10. pnwscout

    pnwscout Farmall Cub

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    Greg R is right if you didn't evacuate it for 24 hrs then you definitely have air and non-condensables in your system and it does put a lot of strain on the compressor which will create noise. We had an inexperienced tech that was just starting out here do the same thing and ended up burning up one of our under counter compressors on my ship. With the air/nons in the system it could cause your pulley clutch to work harder and create abnormal ware and tare on it.

     
  11. INT77345

    INT77345 Farmall Cub

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    in early summer the scout developed a leak at the condenser up front probably from a rock kicked up on the highway. over time all refrigerant leaked out and A/C stopped working.
    i replaced the condenser. i have a vacuum pump. i have the A/C tool that has the 2 gauges on it, high pressure and low pressure. i put vacuum to the system and let it sit holding vacuum for about 30 min. then re fill with refrigerant

    yall are probably correct about some air and non condensables is the system. looking throught the view port/glass on the high pressure hose there are bubbles when the compressor first starts up. bubbles go away in a few seconds.
     
  12. Greg R

    Greg R Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Bubbles are normal on start-up. The leak on the hi-side is better than a leak on the lo-side, less chance of air coming in from the suction side. That does not rule out air, just less of a chance. On a warm 70-80ish degree day, with a load in the cabin say about 70 to 75 degrees and 40-50 degree discharge air temp from the evap and the fan on high; your system operating pressures should be about 30-35 psi suction and 195-210 psi compressor discharge pressure. Very high disharge pressure could be air, an overcharge or too much refrigerant, or a very dirty condensor. Without the numbers, it's impossible to know what's going on. If you can get it, and you really want to learn this stuff, the IH Service Manual CTS 2441-H is the best manual I've seen for servicing MVAC or automotive A/C. It's no frills and gets you to the point with correct procedures. It also has some detail on your York compressor. I'd call Binder Books to see if it's available or look around including Ebay.
     
  13. INT77345

    INT77345 Farmall Cub

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    this is funny i do have a service manual and it is missing section CTS2441-H its in the index not in the book oh well

    the A/C works great, blows really cold just loud compressor i always figured id run the compressor till it gave out then seek out some replacements. as its november, looks like i got through another summer on it.

    so today out driving i took my thermal gun with me and i got a reading of 21 degrees at the vent closest to the evaporator. must be an reading error i dont think it would blow that cold ?
     
  14. pnwscout

    pnwscout Farmall Cub

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    the bubbles are normal during starting. The only way to truly tell if you have air/nons is by checking the high side pressure and converting it to temp with a chart and comparing it to the ambient temp when the compressor and motor are off and have had time to cool down
     
  15. pnwscout

    pnwscout Farmall Cub

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    say your in 70 ambient temp the pressure you want is around 70-72 psi on the high side of the compressor
     
  16. Greg R

    Greg R Lives in an IH Dealership

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    21 degrees does seem a bit low. How cold does the suction line at the compressor get? Is there frost, or the suction valve or line icing up? What's the suction pressure?

    The noise has some checks you could do. Broken or cracked mount or belt adjustment. Old cracked and loose belt. Clutch failing. If it seems internal, maybe check the oil level.

    If you wanted to, this is how to check the compressor oil level. Run the a/c until the compressor is warm, at least it's crankcase. Then let it set a bit and close the service valves. Turn the service valves CW until they're seated, this is called front seating. Slowly unscrew the discharge valve's service cap and let the pressure bleed off. You won't remove the cap, you're just releasing what pressure is in the compressor; a very small amount. After the pressure is bled off, remove the upper crankcase fill plug and insert a 1/8" wire for a dip stick. Stick it in until the bottom is felt then withdraw and measure the oil length on the stick. It should be a 1" min to 1 3/8" max for a horizontal compressor and 1 7/16" max for a vertical compressor. Be sure to have tools, the stick, and anything else ready for this chore to be done quickly. Pre-bend the stick a bit so it goes in straight as possible without hitting the crankshaft, and even the shaft might need a turn or two to clear. Just keep in mind you're not going to let in air and if you want you can purge a tad by cracking open the suction valve and shutting it while putting the plug back in.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016

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