1967 Loadstar "Big Onion"

Discussion in 'General IH Tech' started by TheCrazyFarmer, Jun 5, 2020.


  1. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    Good info!

    I do have a good bit of hills, but I also have plenty of flat rural highways. I'm betting I could get away with mostly going in low gears, until I'm up to speed on the highway, and then going into high? I don't know.

    I definitely don't need to be splitting gears on my hill, I know I will have to take the whole hill in low gears anyway. Obviously, I wouldn't ever have to use low gears in empty driving.

    I don't want to damage it, but at the same time, I do want to learn how to do it if its something I am in fact going to need in the future.
     
  2. kevingweq

    kevingweq Y-Block King

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    Perhaps I added to the confusion by using the word "meant" when "capable of" would of been a better choice .
    Irregardless if you are at max payload and climbing a steep grade you will want all , 9 or 10 forward speeds that split shifting
    will provide . The shift pattern that has been described previously 1L-1H-2L-2H etc provides you with closer numerically spaced upshifts.
    I see no problem driving it the way it was designed if needed for the load and conditions , Granted it does take some practice ,but quickly becomes second nature .
    If load is light and road is flat give it all the gear hopping she will pull

    My 68 F600 had a 361 engine , Climbing the hill loaded out of the local hot top plant it would be near impossible to make a "whole" shift without bogging
    the engine or abusing (slipping) the clutch . The truck had 50k miles on it when purchased and 220k when sold , Never repaired the 2 spd rear axle
    other than a new shifter electric motor , The way I was taught to drive the truck closely mirrors the description in the Dana manual .
     
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  3. Greg R

    Greg R Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Johnny(?) you've got the right attitude. A lot of driving is thinking ahead, how much? how far? and for how long? Your two speed may help a lot with that.
     
  4. mallen

    mallen Y-Block King

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    From what I read, the problem is shifting in a DOWN grade. Up the grade is not an issue as far as I know.
     
  5. roguemustang

    roguemustang Farmall Cub

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    Johnny, I love your truck, what you are learning, and where you are with your skills, especially for a 17yo!! You are very lucky to have found BP and all the info here, I wish I had found it when I still lived out in Oregon....but anyway, since we were on shifting....

    First, I would say that your best bet is to actually find a manual for the Onion to see how IH originally says to shift it. I think it was Kev that mentioned earlier about shifting to high without lifting the gas pedal and then it would shift when you let off (no clutch). That's how my dad taught me to do it in our '59 B160 when I was 11 years old....long ago and far away....I usually used the clutch when dropping from high to low, although it wasn't necessary, it just made the shift a bit smoother.

    I'm not positive on the 5 speed, since ours was a 4 speed, but as noted before, the shifting would be 1L-1H-2L-2H-...etc....if necessary. Unloaded, I would usually leave it in low range and go 2L-3L-4L-4H....loaded, you may need to use hi/lo on all gears. This was the same for all gas trucks I've driven with the two speed rearend. This is obviously different than the larger trucks, like what ScoutBoy was referring to, when you have split gears and you go through all gears in one range and then all gears in the other range. That's not going to be what you have.

    I've also driven a GMC that had the somewhat odd shift pattern with 4L-5L-4H-5H....I'm not sure how IH did the 5 speed.

    Other two speed rear tidbits - I agree with not changing rear when going downhill, that's already been covered. I also recommend not shifting it when going through intersections or across highways since you don't want to miss a gear or blow out U-joints and block a 4 lane highway (ask me how I know that one). Do your practicing when the truck is empty, it's much more forgiving.
     
  6. RBS

    RBS Farmall Cub

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    When I was a young kid, one of my uncles had a medium duty IH grain truck with a 5 speed and 2 speed rear and that was back when those things were new in the late 1960s. It had a factory sticker from IH up on the door pillar with the shift instructions, I remember that well because his wife would drive that truck occasionally during harvest and she would carefully study the sticker to refresh her memory from the season before. She also had to sit on a Sears catalog to comfortably see over the wheel (she was a very short woman) and the clutch pedal was hell for her. But I don't recall her ever blowing a shift.

    They had quite a bit of IH gear on the farm and I suspect their grandson is still using the IH refrigerator/freezer and the IH deep freeze that they got one year when IH was running a promotion to sell more combines.
    Rodger
     
  7. Randall Barringer

    Randall Barringer Y-Block King

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    Good memory, Rodger, thanks for sharing it.
    I can almost picture her about to get in and then remember the transmission dilemma.
    This would be a good decal for Scoutco to reproduce if an OE one could be found.
     
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  8. RBS

    RBS Farmall Cub

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    Randall, I was thinking most of these trucks would have had that decal so maybe someone has an intact decal from the same setup that they could at least photograph to help Johnny with the answer to his operation. I never drove a truck with a 2 speed axle and I assumed that they were just set up for choosing high or low range and not gear splitting.

    A friend of mine was the volunteer fire chief for several years and I know that he dreaded having new people drive one of their water carriers that had a 2 speed rear axle because his feeling was it was too easy to damage the drive train. When I first bought my place out in the country and put in a pool, I paid for the water to be delivered and the fire crew used it as a training exercise. I offered to light a candle in the pool that they could put out to make it official but the chief decided that wasn't necessary.

    Rodger
     
  9. Kurt_M

    Kurt_M Farmall Cub

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    Here is the one off the glove box door of my 1971 Loadstar. Just to note the items that aren't readable say "accelerator pedal as quickly" and "re-engage clutch as quickly" and "clutch method recommended". Also the 3 speed they are talking about is for tandem axles when both axles had a two speed, for those you had both in low for low gear, one in high and one in low for middle gear, and both in high for high gear, that is even more confusing!
    twospeeda.jpg
     
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  10. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    Thanks!

    I'll just keep practicing before I take a trip to get gravel.
     
  11. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    Great story!
     
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  12. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    I have that same tag on my glovebox.
     
  13. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    Here's a fun mystery!

    Had an "interesting" experience yesterday. I was test driving Big Onion, practicing with the Lo/Hi, and everything seemed to be going fine. On the way back, I was going up our steep driveway in 3 Lo, and when I got to the top, I hit the clutch and kinda rolled to a stop. Its kinda difficult to maneuver this thing in our driveway, because our family consists of 11 people, so we have a lot of cars up here. Anyway, I put it into 1st to maneuver into my parking spot, and while I'm slowly moving forward, it starts making a loud screaming/whirring noise. I had no idea what was happening, so I stuck her in neutral, pulled the handbrake, and shut the key............................... Nothing happened...... It kept on running. I shut the key, pulled out the key, nothing would turn the dang thing off. The awful noise stopped, but it was still running. Now is when I do something stupid which I will never do again. I got out of the truck, popped the hood, and decided the best way to kill the thing (IT WASN'T!!!) was to (WAIT FOR IT!!!) pull the ignition wire. (ZAP!) I got shocked for the first time in my life!:no: When I pulled the wire, it stopped rumbling/firing? but it kept spinning. I guess the alternator was keeping the belts moving? I finally killed the thing by knocking the positive battery cable off with a stick. I'm glad I don't tighten the battery cables very tight!

    Now what? What do you think could cause the truck to keep running for a long time after I shut it off? When I got my new tires mounted, I did notice it ran for about 5 seconds after I shut the key, but it died out quick, so I figured it was just run on?

    This seems really weird, so let me know what you think!

    Thanks, Johnny.:cowboy::thumbs up:
     
  14. RBS

    RBS Farmall Cub

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    Johnny,
    It sounds like your starter was engaged and spinning the motor. That would account for the unhappy sound while the starter was spinning with an engine that was still firing. Take a look at the wiring around and from the ignition switch since you had the engine running and the starter engaged both with the ignition in the off position.

    And thanks for sharing your "shocking" experience :) A kill switch in the battery lead isn't a bad idea for vintage vehicles just for situations like this because if the starter was stuck on, removing a battery cable isn't fun. ALSO, always remove the negative cable first from the battery. IF you get a wrench between the positive terminal and the body, frame, or any other grounded part it will arc weld itself into place and you can get a fireworks display, exploding battery, fire, etc. NOT fun!

    I didn't get shocked but several years ago my 2006 GMC Sierra with the 6.6L Duramax turbo diesel wouldn't shut off with the key and I had to pull the ECM relay. It was an odd intermittent problem that set only one trouble code, loss of communications with the separate TCM for the Allison transmission. The issue would only occur once or twice per month and would result in an illuminated check engine light before the key was even in the ignition. Other than this and not shutting off with the key, everything worked perfectly.

    The problem was a mouse had used the underhood bused electrical center (UBEC in GM speak) as a urinal. The UBEC houses all of the fuses, relays, and wiring with interconnecting bare wires between components on a layer below and the interface to various wiring harnesses on the bottom layer. The mouse urine created corrosion between the permanent and switched 12 volt buses and was sufficiently conductive when the humidity was high enough that it would gradually charge decoupling caps in the circuits and the ECM voltage would rise sufficiently that it would turn on its relay supplying power to itself and also preventing the ignition switch from stopping the engine. The TCM was fed from a separate switched bus thus the communications error between the powered ECM and the shut off TCM. It took several hours studying the GM factory service manuals to identify a course of action, 30 minutes making measurements with a DMM to identify the likely suspect, and 10 minutes to replace the damaged UBEC with another one I found via ebay from a totaled truck with the same equipment and trim level.

    The photos of the damage below are why I am very careful to keep mouse traps in operation in both garages and in the barn where the tractor and diesel standby generator reside. I am especially careful now during harvest when the little rodents flee the fields for the warmth and safety of buildings.

    Rodger
    UBEC internal view.JPG
    Close up of damaged area.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2020
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  15. Packerrailway

    Packerrailway High Wheeler

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    TheCrazyFarmer, there is only one SMALL difference between your "little shock" and riding a taser. That being, you CAN LET GO OF THE WIRE. I rode the taser for work so having grown up on a farm I can compare the two.
     
  16. mallen

    mallen Y-Block King

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    "Don't tease me bro!" Lol

    Could be a bad ignition switch.

    Here's my guess. The starter solenoid was engaged. That was the noise and whine was the starter stuck engaged. The reason the engine would not shut off and the ignition system kept firing the spark plugs is because when the starter solenoid is engaged it supplies the full 12v to the coil bypassing the ignition switched resistance wire. So in the case where your solenoid is stuck engaged whether it be mechanically jammed or whether it's because the ignition switch is screwed up supplying power to the solenoid, that wire will be live and keep supplying power to the coil.
     
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  17. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    And even without ignition, it still could spin?
     
  18. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    What ignition wire did you pull,off of the coil?
     
  19. TheCrazyFarmer

    TheCrazyFarmer High Wheeler

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    I disconnected the coil wire from the distributor cap.
     
  20. Jeff Jamison

    Jeff Jamison Lives in an IH Dealership

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    Sounds like a bad solenoid on the starter/stuck starter,when you pulled the coil wire,the starter kept turning the engine over.
     
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