1962 Loadstar 1800 ?

Discussion in 'Triple Diamond Trucks' started by UglySteve, Mar 14, 2019.


  1. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    Hi,
    I am new to this forum, and I want some expert advice.
    Is a 1962 Loadstar 1800 worth buying? Can it be a practical truck to own? Are parts available? I found one cheap, and I could use a truck that can move a heavy load occasionally, for personal use. At the moment, I don't have a lot of details on the truck. The exterior condition looks decent for the age. I have not driven to inspect it yet. If it will be impossible to find parts for, I won't bother.
    Thanks for any advice.
    Steve
     
  2. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    Generally you can still get most parts for the loadstar trucks. The 1800 is a little heavier truck than most occasional users would end up with, but still in the same line. In this part of the country anyways, they are relatively inexpensive rigs compared to other makes of the same sizes.
    The only real downside (in my opinion) to using a truck for the occasional load, is the cost of license and insurance. I could not add the truck onto my regular auto policy because they saw it as a commercial vehicle. I always found that I had to keep it covered with both all the time since I never knew when I'd need it. That meant a considerable cost each year for little use. I eventually went to a trailer to pull behind my pickup. I still have my dad's old farm truck, but I am able to get collector insurance on it and I don't haul with it anymore (or the insurance won't cover it). The same with antique vehicle license.
    On the plus side of the truck is they are fun to drive (although slower), you are up higher and see better, they have much bigger and better brakes than a pickup, can carry a significant load (especially a 1800), and you can snake a truck into a smaller area usually than a pickup and trailer.
    To me, if you would use it on a semi regular basis, its worth it. If its truly occasional use, probably not.
    What part of the county are you in?
     
  3. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    Thank you George. I'm in Arizona. What I really like about it is that it has a small crane on the back. I'm getting older, and lifting heavy things is getting more difficult these days.
    I will call my insurance man and see what it would cost to insure. I started looking in to a CDL, and that may kill this project. If I get a learners permit, I will need someone with a CDL to ride with me to practice driving it. I think it would be a fun toy, but may be I should look for a lighter duty truck that doesn't need a CDL. This one is only $800, and that's tempting.
    Steve
     
  4. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    Unless the factory rated GVW of the truck is over 26000 lbs, I wouldn't think you would need the CDL. Or is it a tractor that you will need to pull a trailer behind? That would put you over.
    In Washington state you can't even apply for one anymore unless you go through a truck driver training school or are employed by a company that is willing to put you through an equivalency program.
    Sounds like a heck of a good price if its running, driving, stopping. I totally understand the crane issue. I no longer like lifting things either.
    I have an old dodge truck with a knuckle boom crane on it that I use. Its not licensed but its small enough I can load it onto my heavier trailer and take it somewhere if I have to. That is a pain and requires another trip if needed. One on a usable truck would be nice.
    I love driving my dad's old 2ton IHC truck. I learned to drive on it in the wheat fields and it brings back a lot of memories.
    Good luck.
     
  5. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    It's not driving. It would be a project. The owner just wants it out of the yard. I have not been over to see it yet. It's a 50 mile drive, so I want to work out my all questions about it first. From what I found on Wikipedia, the gross weight is 30,200 pounds. I don't know if they were made in lighter duty versions. I assume there would be a data plate somewhere that would list the Gross weight? I'm not finding a whole lot of information online.

    Steve
     
  6. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    I found a sales brochure on Ebay for a 62 Loadstar 1800, that lists the GVW as 21,500 to 25,500. https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/nxgAAOSwoudW3ff5/s-l1600.jpg
    Now the GCW lists as 40,000 and 45,000. I think the CDL is only required for a GVW of over 26,000. So there may be some hope that this truck won't require a CDL.
    Steve
     
  7. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    Yes an 1800 can go either way of the 26000 mark. Most I have seen are under. That is all the DOT cares about unless you pull a trailer with it. Then they combine the potential GVW of the truck and trailer to set the GCW. No trailer--no problem.
    Good luck on your new find.
     
  8. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    One reason I want this is to give me the opportunity to pull a large boat or 5th wheel RV. I am currently limited to 5500 pounds. This truck seems like a low cost way to do that. If the trailer is under 10,000 pounds, I don't think I need a CDL. That's what I found on the ADOT web page. Please correct me if I'm wrong. I am planning on looking at on Monday. I'm told that it ran 15 years ago when it was parked. If that's true, I should be able to get it running.
     
  9. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    I won't speak for any other state, but here they are sticklers on GCW numbers. This means if the truck has a factory GVW of 20,000 and the trailer has a GVW of 8,000, then you are over the 26,000 magic number and you are required to have a CDL. Doesn't matter if you actually weigh that much or not, its the capability they look at. It's a criminal offense in Washington so not one to play with I ever thought.
    I don't think there is any way an 1800 series IHC would be able to pull a trailer without the CDL legally. UNLESS, your state has exemptions for "recreational vehicles". I have seen people register their trucks as such to pull the trailers exclusively. Most are legitimate but there are lots of folks that abuse this exception.
    You really need to talk to your local L.E. folks to get this answered. Also be aware the local police may see it differently than the state Dept of Transportation folks that are generally in charge of truck laws and truck weights or inspections. DOT will almost always win in those differences in court.
    Not trying to rain on your parade, but you need to have your eyes fully open before plunging into this one. The local officials are the only ones that can tell you for sure where you live.
    Your internet research sounds promising but I'd still get it in person from the guy that writes the tickets!
     
  10. Greg R

    Greg R Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    I live in Oregon and ran into these same questions when I got an IH L-170 with a GVW of 18,000 lbs. I did find in the Oregon CDL manual that if I'm under the 26,000, I'm not hauling 16 or more people, or hazardous material; I don't need a CDL. Basically the CDLs cover driving for hire and/or weight requirements. Vehicle registration was next. If I chose a truck plate, there was a fee schedule that my GVW put me in the $600/year cost. I talked with the local Dept. of Motor Vehicles and I can put regular (passenger) plates on it; but I can NOT haul anything. If I did want to haul something I can get a trip permit for about $30-40 and was good for about 15 days IIRC. However I was cautioned that they keep track of the number and I may be required to get a truck plate if they deem I get permits too often. The truck itself weighs about 5,500 lbs. I met a family that used an IHC 4700 series truck with single rear axle for a motor home they custom built on it. I believe it had a motorhome registration and they drove it all over with no problem from Massachusetts. It boils down to intended use and registration. You definitely should check with Arizona. The Wisconsin Historical Society has a web page with a section for IHC. You may be able to find the sales/dealer spec sheets for you truck there. They don't have them all, but there are quite a few of them through many years.
     
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  11. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    Here is a quote from the ADOT web page. https://www.azdot.gov/motor-vehicle...rcial-driver-license/vehicles-requiring-a-cdl
    I'm not sure I'm reading this right. I think the trailer has to be rated for over 10,001 pounds to require a CDL. I think the key word in the statement is "when".

    "Vehicles Requiring a CDL
    Combination vehicle (truck and trailer) if the gross combined weight rating (GCWR) is 26,001 pounds or more when the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the trailer, which is added to the GVWR of the power unit (the truck), is 10,001 pounds or more.
    • Class A CDL is required.
    Any vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 pounds or more. A trailer may be towed if the GVWR of the trailer is 10,000 pounds or fewer."

    They also have this flow chart. Looking at the flow chart, I don't think I need a CDL if the GVW of the truck is under 26001, and the GVW of the trailer is under 10001 pounds.
    https://apps.azdot.gov/files/sitefinity-files/18-142-FlowchartCDL-medical.pdf

    They shure make this complicated. I also found a gross weight fee table. It looks like it will have at least $200 added to the registration.

    I looked at the Wisconsin historical society web page, they don't have this truck. I will go look at it monday, and I will look at the VIN data plate on the door for the numbers.

    The more I look at this, the cheap truck is not so cheap.
     
  12. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    Now we're having fun!!
    That flow chart is as clear as mud. It would seem to me that you are right that if the trailer is under 10001 lbs you are OK, but in my opinion its too unclear from that writing to depend on it alone. I still stand on the suggestion you actually talk to somebody that enforces the law, because that is who you will ultimately be dealing with if the unpleasant situation arises.
    Yes gross weight fees and insurance can really take the fun out of old trucks. I have also found the trip permit idea is much better than paying for an entire year of tonnage. Washington doesn't track it quite like Oregon it appears but does have restrictions on how many you are supposed to use in any time period.
    I hope you still go look it over and see what you think after that.
     
  13. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019 at 3:12 PM
  14. Greg R

    Greg R Dreams of Cub Cadets

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    What? You think roads are for free? Talk to your MV Dept. There are different ways to register, and if you're not for hire it may be cheaper than you think.
     
  15. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    I'm not going to buy the truck.
    Thanks for the information .
    Steve
     
  16. George Yingst

    George Yingst Farmall Cub

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    Too much work needed, or too expensive in the long run?
     
  17. UglySteve

    UglySteve Farmall Cub

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    My wife reminded me off all the other projects I have, and the money I spend on them. Even if I only brought it home and replaced the tires, that would be at least $2000, and It's a little too big for my needs. Thanks for the help.
    Steve
     

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