1960 R-185 Brake Adjusters Rusted Solid

Discussion in 'Triple Diamond Trucks' started by 1960 R-185, Aug 13, 2017.


  1. 1960 R-185

    1960 R-185 Farmall Cub

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    I'm trying to fix the rear brakes. Where do I find brake parts for this old rig. I tried using PB Blaster and working the adjusters back and forth, but they didn't want to move. Not sure what to do next. Might have to drill the adjusters out.
    IMG_20170527_112143051_HDR.jpg
     
  2. TRAVELETTE

    TRAVELETTE Farmall Cub

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    Hard to tell you what to do next, since we don't know what point you're at now. Do you have the hubs and drums off? Or are you trying to get the adjusters to turn so that you can pull the hubs and drums? If you have the drums off, heat is the best way to free frozen adjuster screws. Please provide the inside diameter of the drum, the width of the shoes, the number on the axleshaft flange and the model year of this truck. With this info, I can help you find the parts. DSC00656.JPG DSC00205.JPG
     
  3. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong High Wheeler

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    It's a good-looking truck, but as stated above, the details are what count when needing to know a procedure or find specific parts. Besides what Travelette asked, you might be able to send the vehicle's serial number to the Wisconsin Historical Society, (or go through Binder Books, or a Lightline Dealer) to get a copy of the Line Setting Ticket showing what components it was originally built with. Binder Books might even have a manual or Parts book available for that model; it's worth asking.
    If you can get the original IH part numbers, searching online can bring up various sources, although it looks like here, Travelette may well know and have what you need, once you answer his questions. His good pictures seem to show that well!
     
  4. 1960 R-185

    1960 R-185 Farmall Cub

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    Hey Travelette,

    Thanks for the reply. When I bought the truck, the hydraulic line to the rear brakes was disconnected and plugged. I drove the truck 60 miles home on just the front brakes. I think the left rear brake was dragging slightly the whole trip, but about a mile from home it was really dragging hard. I decided to just force it at a slow speed that last mile.

    It took a while to accumulate the tools required to remove the rear wheels/drums. When we did, we found the adjusters to be rusted and stuck, and were unable to get them freed. We got the spur wheel spinning, but it wasn't moving the adjusting shaft in the bore. We removed the left side brake shoes and put it back together so we could drive it (I needed to learn how to drive it -- the trip home was full of gear grinding). Since then, the brake pedal has hit the floor. We looked in the master cylinder -- out of fluid. We were going to pull the front wheels/drums, but found we didn't have a big enough socket to remove the hub cover. Now that's on order. And that's where it sits, with the front wheels off the ground.

    When I get back to working on the rear (could be real soon), I'll try aplying heat to the adjusters. This truck is a 1960. I'll let you know the other info you asked about when I get the drums off again. The parts you show look right.
     
  5. 1960 R-185

    1960 R-185 Farmall Cub

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    Dana Strong,
    I'll try your suggestions and see what info I can find. Thanks for your input.
     
  6. TRAVELETTE

    TRAVELETTE Farmall Cub

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    Since the inner "tangs" are sheared off on the rear adjuster star wheels, drilling them out or replacing the shoe anchors are your only options. Removing the anchors from the backing plate will give you a better chance at a happy result. Each anchor is attached by two bolts and one rivet. The rivet is behind the shoe pivot pin on the end of the anchor opposite the adjuster. The shoe pivot pins are likely to be frozen also, but they need to be freed up anyway. Use great care however you proceed, as there are many different part numbers for the anchors, and we have not yet determined if the ones you need are still available.
     
  7. Dana Strong

    Dana Strong High Wheeler

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    I frequently use heat too,... but long ago I discovered that the Navy personnel, when working on P-3 Orion airplanes, used Methyl Salicylate (synthetic Oil of Wintergreen) as a penetrating oil. In those days it was still available at local drug stores, but can now be gotten from Ebay:

    the first being a much better deal. Besides working well, it does evaporate, so doesn't leave a greasy/oily residue, and it can make your shop smell like a candy store. It's an ingredient in many Air Tool lubricants, and is partly what gave old Dentist shops their 'antiseptic' smell. Everyone I've given any to has agreed with me about it's abilities, including one who's the head of the local Model A club, and another who built a few working copies of the 1908 Wright Bros. Model B engine, both who used it extensively.
     
  8. 1960 R-185

    1960 R-185 Farmall Cub

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    Okay, we got the front brakes back on, the wheels on, and put it back on the ground. Then we pulled the left rear wheel/axel/drum and started to work on the adjusters. After enough PB Blaster and hammering, they came out. It was a big help seeing those pictures you posted, Travelette, so I knew how it was constructed. The right side may not be as easy. That's the side with the sheared adjuster tangs. On the left side, at this point, I think I just need cylinder rebuild kits. The shoes are still good. Here are some pics. IMG_20170820_144129972[1].jpg IMG_20170820_144354784[1].jpg IMG_20170820_154919469_HDR[1].jpg IMG_20170820_165543978[1].jpg IMG_20170820_165556921[1].jpg IMG_20170820_161100738[1].jpg
     
  9. Greg R

    Greg R Y-Block King

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    I would go to a heavy truck supplier. I don't know about Washington, but down here in Oregon we have Brattain International, a large IH dealer going back many years. They dropped the light duty trucks years ago, but they still support medium duty on up including school buses. I have no idea how far back they can go, but I do know some farmers still run some of those old rigs with their support. What's a decent price for a truck like that? There's an R series dump here in town in a parts yard like yours. I kinda took a liking to it, but also wonder what licensing or road use fees would cost. Just wondering also what you use to torque those lugnuts with?
     

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